Management two weeks notice

Thread starter #1

sinclair1

Senior Member
The last several people who put in notice in upper positions that I know, were told to make today the last day.

The one I worked with was treated really bad for about a week and told to get lost.

In your opinion is that becoming the norm?
 

ddgarcia

Senior Member
Yes. At that point the individual is nothing more than a liability to the company. Whether through looking for a "leaving bonus", ie. getting hurt or finding something offensive to sue for or "poisoning" the remaining employees on the company, they want you GONE.

Last job I gave two weeks I was told "Go home, we'll pay you, have a nice two week vacay.
 
Yes. At that point the individual is nothing more than a liability to the company. Whether through looking for a "leaving bonus", ie. getting hurt or finding something offensive to sue for or "poisoning" the remaining employees on the company, they want you GONE.

Last job I gave two weeks I was told "Go home, we'll pay you, have a nice two week vacay.
yup.
 
Loyalty to employers and employees by both parties is a thing of the past I reckon. I haven’t worked as an actual employee for years.
 
Thread starter #6

sinclair1

Senior Member
A two week notice was an old school custom , don't blame employer for instantly showing someone the door , to much risk having them around .
I guess, I was just thinking if I ever make another move, I would take all my vacation and just ghost.
Or I could start the new job while on vacation and give it a try run :bounce:

My last job I worked for 20+ I gave a month notice, worked it and came back to the company after a year. Doesn't appear I need integrity what so ever now days, because they don't seem to have any.
 

Big7

Senior Member
The last several people who put in notice in upper positions that I know, were told to make today the last day.

The one I worked with was treated really bad for about a week and told to get lost.

In your opinion is that becoming the norm?
In mid or upper mgmt. It is increasingly becoming the norm.

They are worried about you putting the server in the cloud or something of that nature. Even though you have zero animosity towards the company, they see you as a threat. Could be data, like I mentioned or... Taking employees with you or... or... or.

Be ready to be shown the door when you give notice. It's not like it used to be. Keeping mid or upper mgmt. is a threat, real or perceived.

Mid- lower mgmt. they will keep on as long as you are not hostile. If they will admit it or not, mid mgmt. lead man/woman are hard to replace vs risk of keeping them on.

Just make SURE you have everything you want or need before you turn in your notice..

And... A subsequent employer ALREADY KNOWS THAT.. Not a problem, at all in the new negotiations. :wink:
 

ryanh487

Senior Member
At my company it depends on what your new job is. If it's a company considered a competitor, you're asked to leave same day. If not, they expect you to finish up anything open and transition your work load to the rest of your team over the next two weeks to help a smooth transition.
 
Thread starter #9

sinclair1

Senior Member
At my company it depends on what your new job is. If it's a company considered a competitor, you're asked to leave same day. If not, they expect you to finish up anything open and transition your work load to the rest of your team over the next two weeks to help a smooth transition.
I am not leaving right now, but where I am going is none of their business. They can pound sand on that info.
 

zedex

Senior Member
When I resigned my position at cabelas, upper management created an environment that quickly became toxic and hostile.
Rather than allowing me to finish the given term or escorting me to the door, they pretty much ran me off. Was ok by me.

I still frequent the store. During my time there, I made many friends on the sales floor and with lower level management. All but one lower level management are females and they always give me hugs when I come in.

Upper level management is all female and all lesbians. They are the ones that decide who gets promoted. The only male manager is a corporate transplant. Every male division manager has been terminated..

My point being, sometimes it's not company policy, its upper level personal policy
 
The two aviation companies I worked for escorted you to the door as soon as you gave your two week notice. Didn't seem to make any difference if you were a janitor or manager. But everybody always gave a notice because if you failed to do so you wouldn't be considered for future employment.
 
The last "job" I had (defining job as employed by some one or group who can hire of fire me), I gave six month's notice. Even then, we struggled to accomplish everything that was mutually beneficial. I came back several times. Admittedly, that was over a decade ago and was not the norm for the time.

I think too many employers today think their business benefits from removing distractions and dead weight (like departing employees). The truth is often the opposite. If an employee is leaving after giving good service, and has been treated fairly, it is likely much better to keep the employee around for most of their "notice" period. Allow the departing employee to say goodbyes and let continuing employees see one of their own move on. - Just my opinion.
 

Patriot44

Senior Member
My company only has one competitor world wide and we are very specialized. If you are in sales or any level of management, and you resign, you are called to HR and forced to re-read your non-comp letter and then escorted to the door by a police officer. Non-comps are tricky legally and normally only senior level management is held to it. And even then it is only valid for a few months or a year. If you are an executive band, you would probably be given a large package to go away for a few years.
 
I gave my notice to a former employee 3-yrs ago. Funny thing is, I was in sales and my customer picked me off. Employer gave me 2-weeks to button up loose ends and transition things over...

Same employer, roughly few months earlier. Our sales director gave notice and commented that he was going to a competitor. We worked out of a satellite office, so his manager was located out of state. They gave him 1-hr to collect his belongings, get his affairs in order and leave. Funny thing is: corporate called another guy in our office who was next in line with seniority. They told him to call the police if the director was not gone by the 1-hr timeframe.
 
Depends who you're working for. As yall said, if you're moving to a competitor, they'll escort you out and change the locks. I wouldn't give a flip about working off the two weeks. I give the notice as a graceful exit, so the bridge isn't burned and I can refer to that job in the future on resumes and applications.
 
Remove what is YOURS.

Give your two weeks notice - ALWAYS

IF they let you go then thats on them but you will have all of your personal stuff already removed from the property.

If they let you stay thats great.
 

j_seph

Senior Member
From our employee manual
When an employee leaves the Company, we ask that Human Resources, a manager, or an officer be notified at least two (2) weeks prior to the employee’s departure. We appreciate employees’ thoughtfulness in this matter. All Company property and equipment must be returned at the time of separation or as otherwise requested by management.
 
And corporations wonder why there is no employee loyalty. I left the corporate world for that and many other reasons almost 35 years ago. I'm glad I did. It's only gotten worse. If my only choices were work for a big corporation or die and go to Hades with a broke back I believe I would choose the latter.
 
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