Millennials, who owns them.

ryanh487

Senior Member
In 2018, there are literally hundreds of thousands of web pages out there showing anyone with half a brain how to do anything they want to do. The problem isn't that nobody showed these kids how to do anything, the problem is these kids expect to be spoon fed every bit of information they think they should know and assume someone is giving them what they need.

My dad never worked on cars and I never took much interest in his fixing things around the house because I was too busy chasing crawdads in the creek and building forts in the woods. When I got my jeep and things started breaking that I couldn't afford to pay someone else to fix, I hopped online, watched a few videos, asked questions on forums, and I figured it out. I've replaced dang near everything on that jeep in the last 8 years, by myself, learning by hunting down the information I needed.

Same with cooking. Momma loves to bake but always leaned heavily on dinner that came from boxes and cans and the freezer because we didn't seem to care. I got a taste for fancier stuff and more variety in my diet once I got out on my own and I looked up recipes and how tos and applied basic principles from certain recipes to my own concoctions that turned out pretty good.

This generation wants to be spoon fed, and they need to be taught to go fend for themselves and track down answers instead.
 

NOYDB

Senior Member
Before Al Gore invented the internet there were books made out of paper. Where you could find everything you needed. So I did. But what I observe now is a complete lack of initiative. No one in my family sailed. We did not have boats. But when a local rec center stared renting sail boats, I got a book on the how tos and went out and did it myself. The information was and is available. The will to learn isn't.
 
The mind set of "I'll learn it when I need to" backfires more times than not.... I think it has to be a dramatic event for things to sink in.
 
Thread starter #45

Ruger#3

MODERATOR
Staff member
There was a time in history not that long ago where it was fairly common for offspring to live at home all the way up until they marry. Even then that didn't guarantee they leave the farm...
During that time kids were laborers, large families equaled more hands. Working on a subsistence farm you learned a lot of essentials at an early age, I know.

While I admire those that learned much on their own I don’t see that as the preferred track. Too many single moms raising kids with no father figure in their lives these days. I also see too many wanting to be a friend and not a mentoring parent. My generation and the next cultivated this problem.

Not all millennials fit this stereotype, I’ve hired some bright hard working young folks. They seem to be the minority.
 
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glynr329

Senior Member
This is one of the best things you can do for a 16 year old. Do not let him drive you or your wives vehicles. Buy him decent ride but one that needs a little work. When it breaks buy the parts but make him fix it. One of my son's graduated from Tech and drives new cars today. I promise the boy knows more than most about cars. If he don't he will look it up and figure it out. I worked on junks all my life and still do.
 

dwhee87

Senior Member
Experts say millennials are behind on these skills because many haven't left childhood homes. The U.S. Census Bureau said in 2015, 34 percent of Americans between 18 and 34 still lived with a parent. That's compared to just 26 percent in 2005.
Heck, I'm no expert, but I can tell you it has way more to do with which home than with how long. Can I get a research grant for that?
 
I'm sure all the same negative stuff above was cussed and discussed about us baby boomers too over all these years. And probably every new generation throughout human history. ::ke:

But that said, I am too very concerned. Not about "skills", anyone can learn a new thing if they have the need and the desire to. But the concepts of what is right and wrong seem to be way, way off kilter.
 
There will be some smart ones out there that see what's on the table. While most will go to college for basket weaving, there will be several porstaffers who make D+ but scrap up through the trades.
The smart kids will claim to be all smart for years and regurgitate junk they read in science weekly, while making a welders fries, but all the money will be made by plumbers and welders in 2030.[/QUOTE
I agree , but you left out electricians!!!!
 
My daughter's freshman year at Kennesaw State, he 3 dorm-mates didn't know how to cook, wash clothes, or iron. Their moms came once a week and did it for them.
Dear God.facepalm:
 
Comes down to the parenting. My kids both went (mostly) to public school and college, and turned out fine, while many of their classmates are idiots.

My daughter's freshman year at Kennesaw State, her 3 dorm-mates didn't know how to cook, wash clothes, or iron. Their moms came once a week and did it for them.

Both mine could cook and do laundry unassisted by the time they were 11 or 12. They had to, or they'd go hungry and wear dirty clothes all the time.

I've said it here before....we are witnessing the result of the participation trophy era of child raising. No winners or losers, no life lessons learned.
Exactly. Anyone not a millennial today is quick to cast the first stone, yet this is the embodiment of the problem - the mom's/parents who continue to foster this kind of behavior. That's a just a joke right there...
 
Thread starter #52

Ruger#3

MODERATOR
Staff member
I'm sure all the same negative stuff above was cussed and discussed about us baby boomers too over all these years. And probably every new generation throughout human history. ::ke:

But that said, I am too very concerned. Not about "skills", anyone can learn a new thing if they have the need and the desire to. But the concepts of what is right and wrong seem to be way, way off kilter.
Both go to the lack of mentoring by adults in their life. The PC school and little adult guidance lead to both.

My second grade teacher wrote a little poem in the front of my 6st grade year book as I left elementary. I can quote it to this day.

“Your future lies before you like a shiny path of snow. Be careful how you tread it for every step will show.”
 
I'm 34, born in 1984. I resent being lumped in with the millennials. I learned to cook early, never really played video games, and love the outdoors. I'm not a mechanic but I can do a few things, change oil and maintain small engines, and grow some groceries.

In college i grilled one evening and had people wanting to buy a home cooked hamburger. I started making money doing simple dinners for a crowd. It was sad how many people had no idea how to cook. My mom died when i was in the 8th grade, and my dad was opening a business and worked 80-100 hours a week to get it going. I did a lot of laundry and cooking in the years to come for my brother and my busy dad.

Kids(under 30) these days,dont know life skills. No child left behind, fear of corporal punishment, participation trophies, school being focused on passing standardized tests instead of learning. No home economics, no more shop class or automotive class unless you are out in the country. Kids are set up for this hardship, and it was baby boomers that created it by "law" and young gen x having kids and not being parents.
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
I'm 34, born in 1984. I resent being lumped in with the millennials. I learned to cook early, never really played video games, and love the outdoors. I'm not a mechanic but I can do a few things, change oil and maintain small engines, and grow some groceries.

In college i grilled one evening and had people wanting to buy a home cooked hamburger. I started making money doing simple dinners for a crowd. It was sad how many people had no idea how to cook. My mom died when i was in the 8th grade, and my dad was opening a business and worked 80-100 hours a week to get it going. I did a lot of laundry and cooking in the years to come for my brother and my busy dad.

Kids(under 30) these days,dont know life skills. No child left behind, fear of corporal punishment, participation trophies, school being focused on passing standardized tests instead of learning. No home economics, no more shop class or automotive class unless you are out in the country. Kids are set up for this hardship, and it was baby boomers that created it by "law" and young gen x having kids and not being parents.

I commend you. :cheers:
 
. Kids are set up for this hardship, and it was baby boomers that created it by "law" and young gen x having kids and not being parents.
That indictment lasts until the kid turns about 21 years old. From there it's on the kid. Your insinuation is the kids are stupid and their parents didn't educate the stupid out of them. Nothing could be farther from the truth. You're making excuses for them rather than offering reasons why young adults can't manage the simple things of life. The truth is there are no reasons why they can't manage. Show up on time and make an effort and the world will turn for you. Don't do those two things and nobody is going to have any time for you.
 
That indictment lasts until the kid turns about 21 years old. From there it's on the kid. Your insinuation is the kids are stupid and their parents didn't educate the stupid out of them. Nothing could be farther from the truth. You're making excuses for them rather than offering reasons why young adults can't manage the simple things of life. The truth is there are no reasons why they can't manage. Show up on time and make an effort and the world will turn for you. Don't do those two things and nobody is going to have any time for you.
Very true, it is the kid. My indictment is against the system in which they were brought up in though. Responsibility for yourself and your actions is lost upon the majority now, young and older. In 6 years in law enforcement I had maybe 1 in 50 encounters where someone actually told the truth about what they had done/their involvement. Everyone wanted to blame someone/something else or not admit any fault of their own. Young adults cant handle the simple things because they have never been forced to. They dont understand the old 5 minutes early is 10 minutes late. I had an employee once tell me about why he never studied for tests. In English/Lit he could fail a quiz, but if he typed some spelling words out 10 times each he could replace that failed quiz with a 100. He boasted "type the word, copy it, then paste it 9 more times. That's a lot easier than reading an essay and passing the quiz." That was back in 2008. His consequences of not doing something was easier than doing the original work! How will kids learn to work a full 40 hour (or more) job, showing up on time, staying late if needed to get the job done if they have never had to actually work for something in their life? Kids these days need real consequences. Schools are handicapped now to the point consequences only come if there is violence from the student. Parents are unwilling to punish, or are absent for whatever reason, so kids dont get structure and discipline at home either. I'm thankful for the consequences I got as a kid. I'm thankful I had to learn a few things as a kid, as they came in handy when at 14 years old I regularly didn't see my dad for 2-4 days at a time during the school year.
 
How will kids learn to work a full 40 hour (or more) job, showing up on time, staying late if needed to get the job done if they have never had to actually work for something in their life?
Hunger is a very powerful motivator.:wink:
 
I think Millenials go back to the Children of the depression. When those kids became adults, they tried to make things better for their kids, a lot of them who fought in WWII. That generation, tried to make things even better for the Baby boomers, as the country was going through a period of wealth for the middle class. This kept repeating until we got to where we are today. Mix in about 85% liberal educators, a few table spoons of the MSM, a cup and a half of social media and a cup of gratuitous violence and stupidity of left wing Hollywood, and season to taste a high rate of divorce and single parent families absent religion and bake for about 6 years. Some people prefer it with a big plate of sexual identity. What could go wrong with that recipe.
 
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