missing bear hunter

Thread starter #1
I am surprised it hasn't been mentioned about the guy missing up here since Saturday !! I haven't seen but very little about it in the news !! Apparently he was hunting (bear) alone. In that area where he was/is a no no !! Two of his dogs were found Monday treed on on a bear. His third dog was found yesterday. The local SAR folks, EMS, RCSO alone with Stephens County and Habersham as well as DNR folks are still at it as if they are in it for the long haul !!
 

turkeykirk

Senior Member
#2
Hope all turns well.
 
#7
It isn't looking good at this point. Sad deal.
 
#8
yikes! on FB page says he's a severe diabetic, so doesn't sound good at all. while they found his dogs & a tree'd bear, doesn't mean that the bear didn't hit the ground, run a ways, then get re-tree'd in a 2nd location. so finding the dogs doesn't necessarily mean they found his immediate location. really sad
 
Thread starter #9
Article I read said he was training dogs. And it was legal.
apparently the Southern Zone in Georgia has more political pull than the North !! Don't know how many (population ) there are down there ! But they are everywhere up here !!
 
#13
Bad deal right there. Prayers for his family. I hunt and fish deep in the mountains alone most of the time, and there is no doubting its inherent risks.
 

Rabun

Senior Member
#15
So very glad the man was recovered. My prayers go out to his loved ones and family. Many of us scout and hunt alone. My heart goes out.
 
Thread starter #16
They are saying he was in some a very very rugged area. They got him out last night.
 

bany

Senior Member
#17
I’m glad they found him. RIP Hunter.
 
#18
You know, I knew about the search from the day it began, but for some reason I never thought to put it on the forum.
I had heard he was a diabetic and usually used insulin about every three hours or so. I don't know the validity of that though. Being a bear dog man is a tough proposition in his shoes. Running a bear race burns glucose in the blood and liver stores. Glucose levels often fluctuate at night naturally for a lot of people as well. He probably took his insulin, then headed out, spent his natural store of blood glucose. He likely got tired, dizzy, and sat down to rest and gather himself, and passed out and went into a coma. That is 100% speculation, but a likely timeline.
He was in some real rough, rugged terrain back in there. Those kinds of woods can swallow you whole out there. They can eat you alive....can eat any person alive....healthy or not.
The good things we can take away from this are lessons learned.
Know your woods and your terrain. Be vigilant. Carry a GPS. Let people know exactly where you are going (which is really impossible for a dog man, and I understand that). Carry more food and water than you need. If you have medical issues, be prepared to address them in the woods. When it comes to light sources, two is one, and one is none. One can or will failure you. The second can back up the first source. If that goes out, your hiney better have a third.
This is a tragic event that could have been avoided if a second hunter were present. If radio contact or cell service were present. If medical supplies were present. It is a reminder and warning to us all to be and always remain prepared, and to exercise good judgement and wise discretion. Remember that you can always fight the mountain, but it is bigger than you are, and it never moves.
Hunt within your capabilities, and avoid places that could likely get you killed like where he went. Never enter the roughest, deepest places you can find just to tree a regular old bear. There are bears everywhere in NE GA, and not in places that can kill you. Your life and health mean much more than a picture with a smelly old bear. Be smart, and hunt smart.
 
#19
You know, I knew about the search from the day it began, but for some reason I never thought to put it on the forum.
I had heard he was a diabetic and usually used insulin about every three hours or so. I don't know the validity of that though. Being a bear dog man is a tough proposition in his shoes. Running a bear race burns glucose in the blood and liver stores. Glucose levels often fluctuate at night naturally for a lot of people as well. He probably took his insulin, then headed out, spent his natural store of blood glucose. He likely got tired, dizzy, and sat down to rest and gather himself, and passed out and went into a coma. That is 100% speculation, but a likely timeline.
He was in some real rough, rugged terrain back in there. Those kinds of woods can swallow you whole out there. They can eat you alive....can eat any person alive....healthy or not.
The good things we can take away from this are lessons learned.
Know your woods and your terrain. Be vigilant. Carry a GPS. Let people know exactly where you are going (which is really impossible for a dog man, and I understand that). Carry more food and water than you need. If you have medical issues, be prepared to address them in the woods. When it comes to light sources, two is one, and one is none. One can or will failure you. The second can back up the first source. If that goes out, your hiney better have a third.
This is a tragic event that could have been avoided if a second hunter were present. If radio contact or cell service were present. If medical supplies were present. It is a reminder and warning to us all to be and always remain prepared, and to exercise good judgement and wise discretion. Remember that you can always fight the mountain, but it is bigger than you are, and it never moves.
Hunt within your capabilities, and avoid places that could likely get you killed like where he went. Never enter the roughest, deepest places you can find just to tree a regular old bear. There are bears everywhere in NE GA, and not in places that can kill you. Your life and health mean much more than a picture with a smelly old bear. Be smart, and hunt smart.
As a backpacker I can see some very good advice in your response. I bought a nice fancy "tactical" flashlight. It works good in a perfect environment. Get it a little damp or cold and it's useless.
I guess you are saying "a man has to know his limitations."
Last time I was deep in the mountains waiting to go to sleep, I thought, how would I ever get out of here in an emergency?

Once I was taking my 90 year old Dad canoeing for a few days and nights and said to Mom, "what if something happens to Dad in the middle of the night?"
She said he would be doing what he likes and not to worry about it.

So in one way I guess we can only prepare as best as we can, take precautions, be prepared, etc. but if we die, at least we were doing what we like.

One can't just sit at home because he may not make it out of the woods alive. I know this isn't what you are saying and I totally agree with your advise. Especially let someone know where you are. Don't let the hunt overcome your limitations, etc.

There is a balance to each and every outdoor activity. We can learn from our trips as well as those of others. The good ones and the bad ones.

For me it's a fear of kidney stones deep in the woods in the middle of the night. We each have our personal fears.
 
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