Muzzlebrakes and Fluted Barrels

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bwsmith

Senior Member
What are the advantages and disadvantages of a muzzlebrake? I know they are designed to reduce recoil but does it significantly increase noise or decrease accuracy?

What about fluted barrels. I know they look nice, but what is the advantage or disadvantage to them?

I think that is all my random questions for the day ::;
 

Flaustin1

Senior Member
Muzzle brakes do increase the noise heard by the shooter by quite a bit. To my knowledge they will not decrease accuracy in any way. The advantage to having flutes is that it increases the surface area of your barrel allowing for more efficient cooling. Some say that it also stiffens the barrel allowing for better accuracy but i dont know that to be a fact. Just things ive read. Correct me if im wrong though.
 

take em

Senior Member
Muzzle brakes reduce recoil but dramatically increase noise. Installing a muzzle brake should have no impact on accuracy but can lead to the shooter performing better.

Fluted barrels have more surface area in relation to diameter so they dissipate heat faster. You also lighten the barrel when you flute it without losing stiffness.
 

germag

Gone But Not Forgotten
Yeah, I can tell you that a well designed muzzle brake will dramatically reduce felt recoil, but nothing is free. The price is dramatically increased noise for the shooter and bystanders. The thing that makes the muzzle brake work is also the thing that makes it louder...it redirects the gasses (and muzzle blast).

A muzzle brake won't have any negative affect on accuracy and can improve the accuracy of the shooter by eliminating the negative effects of recoil on technique, as take em pointed out.

The benefits of fluted barrels is a topic that is widely debated. If you go to the websites of different barrel makers, you'll find some that believe in them and offer fluted barrels and fluting services and some that won't even do it and don't offer a fluted barrel.

The only benefit I've ever personally observed is that they look kind of cool.
 

germag

Gone But Not Forgotten
That's right. The solution is to have the gunsmith make you a thread protector when he installs the brake so you can take the brake off for hunting. I have that on a .300 Win Mag....works out great.
 
The muzzle brake is one of the most effective recoil reducing mechanisms on the market. One of the things I like about brakes is that they generally dont add weight or lengthen pull like some other recoil reducers. My favorite brake is the adjustable Savage factory brake. It can be turned on or off to suit your situation. I have several rifles equippped with them and love them. They do require cleaning and lubrication after firing though to prevent them from locking up.
As far as increase or decrease of accuracy, every rifle barrel is different and any changing of the harmonics of a barrel can affect accuracy either positively or negatively. My rifles equiped with brakes are tack drivers with the brakes opened or closed.
Yes, they do increase noise some but you gotta make up your mind which you would rather have noise or recoil.
As to your question on barrel fluting it is supposed to aid barrel cooling and provide a lighter weight barrel for its outside diameter. They do look cool so everybody needs at least 1.
I have a 116 with both features that is Uber accurate so obviously I'm a fan.
 
Some say that it also stiffens the barrel
How can removing metal from the barrel make it more stiff? In fact, the opposite is true. Fluting make the barrel less stiff.
 
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How can removing metal from the barrel make it more stiff. In fact, the opposite is true. Fluting make the barrel less stiff.
this is exactly correct. by fluting the barrel, you're reducing the geometric moment of inertia...which results in larger deflections for the same applied loads.

for two barrels of exactly the same outside diameter, one fluted and one not, the solid barrel will be "more stiff".

as others have said, fluting removes weight, so in theory, you could have a larger diameter barrel that weighs the same as a solid barrel. it is possible that the larger fluted barrel would be more stiff, because the moment of inertia is dependent upon the barrel radius.

-matt
 

germag

Gone But Not Forgotten
this is exactly correct. by fluting the barrel, you're reducing the geometric moment of inertia...which results in larger deflections for the same applied loads.

for two barrels of exactly the same outside diameter, one fluted and one not, the solid barrel will be "more stiff".

as others have said, fluting removes weight, so in theory, you could have a larger diameter barrel that weighs the same as a solid barrel. it is possible that the larger fluted barrel would be more stiff, because the moment of inertia is dependent upon the barrel radius.

-matt
Yep, that's actually the claim....that if you have two barrels of the same length and weight, one fluted and the other not fluted, the fluted barrel will be stiffer because of the increased diameter.
 
I like brakes and flutes.

this one really does a great job reducing recoil. It is not locked on so if I were to take it hunting I could removed the brake. The POI does not change with the brake removed, I have tested this on this rifle.

 

Flaustin1

Senior Member
After alot of researching barrel stiffness in relation to fluting everything that GERMAG said seems to be correct. Thanks for the enlightenment!
 
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