need a gravy recipe

#2
Fry up a mess of cubed steak. Leave enough grease in the pan just to cover the bottom. Add about 4 tablespoons of AP flour and cook in the grease until dark and bubbly. Add a good ol country boy portion of black pepper. Toss in some salt. Then add water slowly while stirring and get to your desired gravy thickness.

Slop the gravy over everything on yer plate and enjoy. :cheers:
 

DBM78

Senior Member
#3
Fry up a mess of cubed steak. Leave enough grease in the pan just to cover the bottom. Add about 4 tablespoons of AP flour and cook in the grease until dark and bubbly. Add a good ol country boy portion of black pepper. Toss in some salt. Then add water slowly while stirring and get to your desired gravy thickness.

Slop the gravy over everything on yer plate and enjoy. :cheers:
Yep that's about all there is to it. Maybe your using to much flour.
 

ccookou812

Senior Member
#4
The important thing is to not stop stirring as you add the flour then stir even more when the water goes in. other wise lumps will be the result:stir::stir::stir::stir:
 
#5
Anything that leaves some 'crusties' in the bottom of the pan can be used to make some good gravy...bacon, salmon patties, cubed steak, fried chicken, fried pork chops...anything except other fish.
You need those little crunchies to get the best taste.:fine:
 
#6
Make sure you work all of the flour into the grease prior to adding any liquid. Adding the liquid before the flour sticks to all of the grease is a sure fire way to get clumpy gravy!
 

specialk

Senior Member
#9
instead of straight water use a broth of some type, chicken or beef is the most common,





but rabbit broth makes the best gravy in the world(and dumplings):biggrin2:
 
#10
instead of straight water use a broth of some type, chicken or beef is the most common,





but rabbit broth makes the best gravy in the world(and dumplings):biggrin2:
Your're right... i did use beef broth last time i made gravy with my cubed steak. Forgot about that... :crazy:

If you use broth, then ixnay on the altsay. :bounce:
 
#12
The important thing is to not stop stirring as you add the flour then stir even more when the water goes in. other wise lumps will be the result:stir::stir::stir::stir:

I've got a strainer in my utensil jar, and I use that to shake the flour in. no lumps and let's you judge how much flour to use.

Use milk instead of all or part of the water, you get milk gravy.

Likewise, a bit of red wine.

Or go the other way and use some cold coffee.

A half teaspoon of tabasco sauce will really bring the flavor out without making it hot.

Also once you have finished making the gravy, and you're not quite satisfied, a couple of pats of cold butter ( the real thing) put into the gravy over the lowest heat, will thicken it up and add some flavor.
 

Kawaliga

Gone but not forgotten
#13
If you like onion gravy, but don't like all the grease, try this.
One can of golden mushroom soup, stir in 1/2 can of water, and pour in a skillet. Cut up a large onion and add to soup mixture. Put in oven at 300 degrees for an hour----- onion gravy.
 
M

Mrs.Hornet22

Guest
#14
b1--the first thing is you got to have your great grandma's black fryin' pan. Then you fry up some deer meat or anything else. Pour off all the oil that you can without losing the drippings. Let your pan sit level till it gets a little cool then put a fork under one side to get a little more oil in one corner of the pan and pour off again. Wipe off what dribbles down the side so you don't get flamige.Turnto med high,sift flour in like 25-06 said; it works better that way. After the flour is in, hit as hard as you like with pepper, got to cook that in with the flour for flavor. ALL THE WHILE STIRRING! When you get a good Rue (sp) add milk. ALL THE WHILE STIRRING! I like to get my milk room temp before adding. Can micro it for a little bit if you don't put it out soon enough. Add as much as you might need depending on how much flour you used. If it's to thin, keep cooking and STIRRING, it will get thick. Hope this helps a little bit.Posted by hornet22
 

garnede

Senior Member
#16
Start with 1/4 cup of shortening or bacon grease. Melt the fat till it is bubbling but not smoking. Add a pinch of salt and a little pepper. then add the flour, it may take some practice to judge how much to use. You want it to be a smooth paste not runny or thick and clumpy. Then depending on the type of gravy you might want to let the rue brown. Then add the liquid. I like milk or milk and water. Over medium or medium low heat stir till it thickens. Once it thickens remove from heat and serve.
Tip the more rue, oil and flour mixture, you have in comparison to the liquid the quicker it will thicken.
Tip if you do not let the four cook long enough the flour will taste raw.

For meat gravy, use either stock or drippings and bring them to a light boil, then separately in a cup of cold water add a couple of table spoons of corn starch. Stir till it has a smooth consistency. Slowly pour the cornstarch mixture into the boiling stock. Do it slowly enough that it remains at a boil. While pouring stir, or you will get lumps. After stirring it in let it simmer for 10-20 minutes till it thickens. The longer you let it boil the thicker it will get. This works for giblet gravy at thanksgiving.
 

aligator

Senior Member
#17
From time to time I do get lumps. No problem, I put it all in a blender for a little bit, lumps gone. Put back in the fry pan to cook. For the "right" color I use a little Kitchen Bouquet.:flag:
 

jimbo4116

Retired Moderator
#18
From time to time I do get lumps. No problem, I put it all in a blender for a little bit, lumps gone. Put back in the fry pan to cook. For the "right" color I use a little Kitchen Bouquet.:flag:
Just remember to never add flour after you have added the water, milk or broth. That will bring on lumps every time.
 
Top