New snake for me.

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I was driving today and saw this snake dead on the side of the road. He was a very bright copper color and about 6 feet long. He was so bright he almost looked pinkish white in the sunlight. I have never seen a coach whip before, and I have spent my entire life hunting and fishing in central and south Georgia, so I know they cannot be common. Is that what this is?
 

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FOLES55

Senior Member
Nic, took the words from my mouth.
 
Thread starter #5
It was a shame it got run over. It was so brightly copper colored it almost had a pink rainbow sheen to it. I've never seen a snake that shiny. Without a doubt the prettiest color on a snake I've ever seen. The pictures don't it justice.
 
I see them crossing roads acting just saw one last week. Last year I had a big one cross behind my vehicle over off New York ave in leesburg. The dude behind me swerved just so he could run it over. Man that really angered me. Wanted to wreck him. That’s one cool snake
 
I've never saw one, cool snakes.
 
They don't mind lettin you know they're boss either. Never been intimidated by a snake. Have a healthy respect for all of them, but the first coachwhip I ever saw was a biggun and he stood his ground with little reservation of who it belonged to. Great snakes.
 
I did not realize it until I looked it up, but according Wikepedia, the longest Coachwhip on record is 102". That is 8 and a half foot long.
 

Nicodemus

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I did not realize it until I looked it up, but according Wikepedia, the longest Coachwhip on record is 102". That is 8 and a half foot long.
I caught one back in 1996 that was real close to that length. That rascal was a handful too. Took two of us to stretch it and one to measure.
 
I've seen several coachwips where we hunt over in the Columbus area. They are definitely an aggressive snake. First one I ever saw zipped across the road in front of Dad and I like a flash. We stopped and followed it into the pines to see what it was. We found it at the base of a pine tree, as soon as it saw us it came right at us and we both went airborne. Zipped under us and back across the road again. Cool snake.
 
Thread starter #13
My Grandmother used to tell me of them. Said they would run you down, wrap you up and whip you with their tail.
 
When I was kid, one summer in central Alabama, I was attempting to walk through a big field of dried reeds to get to a beaver pond under a railroad trestle, to swim in. The reeds were about as tall as me, no path. About a third of the way through the field, I heard one long swoosh after another, through the reeds, something sliding through them fast, around me. I don't know if it was one snake or several, but I turned around and went back to the cabin. My uncle told me it was coachwhips...
 
I did not realize it until I looked it up, but according Wikepedia, the longest Coachwhip on record is 102". That is 8 and a half foot long.
I've seen a couple around the 8 foot mark. I have photos somewhere, I'll try to dig them out.
 

Nicodemus

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I see them crossing roads acting just saw one last week. Last year I had a big one cross behind my vehicle over off New York ave in leesburg. The dude behind me swerved just so he could run it over. Man that really angered me. Wanted to wreck him. That’s one cool snake

That`s only a couple of miles from my house. Lot of diamondbacks through that stretch too.

I think coachwhips have better than normal vision too, with those big ol` eyes they have. Several years ago down at our Seminole cabin, I was walking down to the boat ramp. About 50 yards ahead of me a whopper of a coachwhip slid out on the road. I stopped and got my phone out. As soon as I took the first step headed towards it, it lifted its head up, turned, and looked straight at me. My next step and it turned and went back the way it came from faster`n greased lightning. Now I know they can sense vibrations but from that far off on a paved road, and i was walking light?
 
Thread starter #18
That`s only a couple of miles from my house. Lot of diamondbacks through that stretch too.

I think coachwhips have better than normal vision too, with those big ol` eyes they have. Several years ago down at our Seminole cabin, I was walking down to the boat ramp. About 50 yards ahead of me a whopper of a coachwhip slid out on the road. I stopped and got my phone out. As soon as I took the first step headed towards it, it lifted its head up, turned, and looked straight at me. My next step and it turned and went back the way it came from faster`n greased lightning. Now I know they can sense vibrations but from that far off on a paved road, and i was walking light?
Maybe he winded you. Just kidding.

A few years ago we have one of them country car ports that my wife parks under. It’s metal and has braces at the eve. Well some birds had built a nest. I noticed it because of the droppings on her car hood. I went out there one day just to get an idea of if the eggs had hatched out and all I see is rat snake coils. I pull it out and let it go. Here’s the thing. I looked and looked and looked and still can’t figure out how that snake got up there and how he knew that nest was there to start with. It’s a free standing, with metal poles. It’s 5 feet before the metal roofing begins to wrap down the sides. Even if he got there he would have had to weave himself back and forth through the gaps under the tin for another 13 to the eve brace which is about 10 foot high. But the dangest thing was how did he know they were up there to start with, and how did he know which pole to climb. If he had went up any other pole he couldn’t have got there, no way. And there’s no trees around the structure to climb from.
 

Nicodemus

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Maybe he winded you. Just kidding.

A few years ago we have one of them country car ports that my wife parks under. It’s metal and has braces at the eve. Well some birds had built a nest. I noticed it because of the droppings on her car hood. I went out there one day just to get an idea of if the eggs had hatched out and all I see is rat snake coils. I pull it out and let it go. Here’s the thing. I looked and looked and looked and still can’t figure out how that snake got up there and how he knew that nest was there to start with. It’s a free standing, with metal poles. It’s 5 feet before the metal roofing begins to wrap down the sides. Even if he got there he would have had to weave himself back and forth through the gaps under the tin for another 13 to the eve brace which is about 10 foot high. But the dangest thing was how did he know they were up there to start with, and how did he know which pole to climb. If he had went up any other pole he couldn’t have got there, no way. And there’s no trees around the structure to climb from.

It probably "tasted" them. When they are flicking that tongue, that`s what they are actually doing. Tasting the scent molecules that are being carried with the air currents. They can track prey this way. Venomous snakes use it to track down prey they have bitten.

Dang, that coachwhip just might have winded me! :unsure:
 
Thread starter #20
It probably "tasted" them. When they are flicking that tongue, that`s what they are actually doing. Tasting the scent molecules that are being carried with the air currents. They can track prey this way. Venomous snakes use it to track down prey they have bitten.

Dang, that coachwhip just might have winded me! :unsure:
About 10 years ago I was bow hunting. Walking down a logging road I heard a squirrel making that bark they make when they are spooked, the one that trails off into a long whine. It kept on and I walked over under the tree where it was coming from. All of a sudden a squirrel fell 30 foot out of the tree stone cold dead. It hit the ground and never moved. I sat for about 15 minutes waiting for a snake to come down the tree. I'm convinced that what killed it. Never saw a snake. In hindsight, I should have walked over and examined it for fang bites. I didn't, but I'm still convinced a snake bit that squirrel.
 
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