Nut grass and Johnson grass

Thread starter #1

releehweoj

Senior Member
Have always had a problem with both in our food plots but this year we had it in spades. Both are starting to turn yellow and feel sure, as in the past, both will wither and die with first frost - if we ever get one. Have over-seeded with both wheat and turnips in anticipation of a die off that would allow new germination. Would like to be a little more pro-active next year and try a pre-emergent if there is one that will help. Thoughts?
 

Jake Allen

Administrator
I had success this year killing off a bunch of nutgrass. I sprayed the overgrown plots in July with 4 oz per gallon of 41% glosyphate. This killed off the bahai grass, broomsedge and weeds. The nut grass grew thick like a carpet when it hit the sun. I sprayed again in mid August, using 4.5 oz of 41%, plus 1 oz of dawn dish soap per gallon. 2 weeks later all of the thick, carpet look growth of nutgrass was dead as a hammer. This has made a big difference in the oats growong this fall.
 
Preemergents don't work well on sedges, it would with Johnson grass. Selective herbicides will also only do one or the other. Roundup would be cheapest but to kill both in one pass will take 3qts per acre and honestly I'd add clethodim or fluazifop since there is some Johnson grass that is demonstrating some resistance to glyphosate.
 

Stroker

Senior Member
You didn't state what you were planting in your food plots but if your planting soybeans, peas, sunflowers, corn or sorghum I'd go with a preplant/preemergent like maybe Dual Magnum(S-metolachlor) or Lasso(alachlor)and then follow up with a postmergant like Fusilade(fluazfiop) 2/3 weeks later. None are labeled for clover or brassicas.
 
Thread starter #6

releehweoj

Senior Member
You didn't state what you were planting in your food plots but if your planting soybeans, peas, sunflowers, corn or sorghum I'd go with a preplant/preemergent like maybe Dual Magnum(S-metolachlor) or Lasso(alachlor)and then follow up with a postmergant like Fusilade(fluazfiop) 2/3 weeks later. None are labeled for clover or brassicas.
We generally plant wheat, oats, rape and either turnips or radishes. Read a couple of articles that describe methods similar to what Jake mentioned above. Both talked about multiple rounds of burning with glyphosate and tilling to bring the tubers to the surface to dry out and die. Not sure about the cost of pre- and post- herbicide treatments. Not a lot of fat in the budget so may explore that if the burn/till strategy doesn't work out.
 

Dbender

Senior Member
If you are only planting fall food plots, just wait to plant a little later than you have been. You wait until the 2nd week or so in Oct and they won't be an issue. I double up on my seed rates and it will easily outcompete/smother the sedges until they die off at first frost.
 
Thread starter #8

releehweoj

Senior Member
If you are only planting fall food plots, just wait to plant a little later than you have been. You wait until the 2nd week or so in Oct and they won't be an issue. I double up on my seed rates and it will easily outcompete/smother the sedges until they die off at first frost.
Have considered planting later. The reason we plant mid-Sept is because we have few mast areas on the property. Mostly planted pines. We are surrounded by ag fields but come early Oct most of the beans and peanuts get harvested. Planting in Sept seems to help keep the deer on the property when the crops around us disappear around opening day. As I said earlier, this was an insignificant issue 6 years ago when I started planting. It has gotten to the point where, for most of the plots, the nutgrass (and Johnson grass) out competes the crops we are trying to grow.
 

GeorgeShu

Senior Member
You might try doing your soil prep earlier to allow for a growth flush of the weeds. Treat what ever emerges to reduce the weed seed bank. Do it twice if you have the time. Won’t cure the entire problem but it will help.
 

Dbender

Senior Member
I've fought sedges and sandspurs for years. I can't tell it's even made a dent. I don't think you are going to see a significant reduction in the nut grass by working ground earlier and burning it back. Sedges and sandspurs are rough.

I'm still old fashioned and beat the dirt up pretty good before I plant my plots. I rarely use chemicals unless I develop a grass problem. Not sure of your time constraints and resources but I would consider fertilizing, and then planting cowpeas or beans late summer. Then just turn them under and replant your fall mix in early october when the forecast is good(critical).


I have a healthy deer herd and they'll wipe out soybeans in the spring but usually the beans can stay ahead of the deer if planted in late summer. Of course this would depend on rain.
 
I had nutsedge in my yard really bad this year. I found some Sedgrhammer online and mixed it up. Killed the sedge about 80% first application. 1 month later I sprayed again and got probably 98%. The problem is that it has underground roots/nut/pods that will continue to reproduce. It will take a few years of vigilance to get rid of it.
 
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