Pork/blood pressure ??

Cottontail

Senior Member
Thread starter #1
Is pork really bad to eat with high blood pressue or is it just because its greasy ??? I never really thought about it till recently when i was put on bp medication. Thought this would be a great place to ask since theres a lot of bbq going on here.
 

Milkman

Retired Moderator
#2
Is pork really bad to eat with high blood pressue or is it just because its greasy ??? I never really thought about it till recently when i was put on bp medication. Thought this would be a great place to ask since theres a lot of bbq going on here.
I think this falls under the don't ask don't tell protection act :rofl::rofl: This will probably get an amen from at least one of the mods of this forum:hair:
 
#3
I googled this for you. http://www.essortment.com/eating-pork-cause-high-blood-pressure-62150.html

Relatively generic info, but hard to argue with. I've just recently been prescribed blood pressure medication also....not too mention by-pass surgery.

Am I going to stop eating pork? No!

Will I cut back on my pork consumption? Maybe!

Will I consume smaller portions when I do eat pork? Good possibility!

:cheers:
 
#5
I don't think it's the pork fat. The salt in ham & bacon yes. Other risk factors involved too. I found this info:
At the beginning of the last century, most of the fats in our forefathers diet were either saturated or monounsaturated, mostly from butter, lard, tallow, coconut oil and small amounts of olive oil. Today most of the fats in our diet are polyunsaturated from vegetable oils mostly from soy, as well as from corn, safflower and canola. Before 1920 coronary heart disease was a rarity in America, causing no more than 10% of all deaths. Today heart disease accounts for at least 40% of all deaths. Is there a connection? We believe there is, and a growing body of scientists, researchers, and health care professionals is beginning to stand up to the politically correct diet dogma that is dictating low fat diets and vegetable fats instead of animal or tropical fats.
 
#6
Myth #1: Saturated Fats Clog Arteries and Cause Heart Disease
In a three-year study conducted at the University of Washington, researchers examined the diets and coronary artery conditions of 235 women in the United States with an average age of 66.
At the study’s inception, researchers took X-rays of 10 locations along each woman's coronary arteries, wherein all subjects were found to have some measure of plaque buildup. The women kept comprehensive records of the foods they ate and in what amounts, including the types of oils they used for frying and baking. At the end of the three year period, researchers then took a second set of X-rays.

It was found that women who had regularly eaten the highest amounts of saturated fats had the least amount of additional plaque buildup in their arteries. Also, women who ate more saturated fats had a healthier balance of good and bad cholesterols and more desirable blood concentrations of various kinds of fats. Factors such as age, education, smoking habits, and use of medication were accounted for by the researchers

The Real Problem
So if it's not the saturated fat from those steaks and burgers we Americans love so much that's causing the rise in heart disease and obesity, then what is? Believe it or not, it's the "heart-healthy" oils like canola that are doing much of the damage. When these oils are heated, they convert into trans fats and also produce large amounts of free radicals.

These trans-fats are 97% positively correlated with arterial plaque and experts are now suggesting that trans-fats are responsible for between 30,000 and 100,000 heart disease deaths per year. Harvard researchers are calling trans-fats "the biggest food processing disaster in U.S. history."
 
#7
I don't think it's the pork fat. The salt in ham & bacon yes. Other risk factors involved too. I found this info:
At the beginning of the last century, most of the fats in our forefathers diet were either saturated or monounsaturated, mostly from butter, lard, tallow, coconut oil and small amounts of olive oil. Today most of the fats in our diet are polyunsaturated from vegetable oils mostly from soy, as well as from corn, safflower and canola. Before 1920 coronary heart disease was a rarity in America, causing no more than 10% of all deaths. Today heart disease accounts for at least 40% of all deaths. Is there a connection? We believe there is, and a growing body of scientists, researchers, and health care professionals is beginning to stand up to the politically correct diet dogma that is dictating low fat diets and vegetable fats instead of animal or tropical fats.
Myth #1: Saturated Fats Clog Arteries and Cause Heart Disease
In a three-year study conducted at the University of Washington, researchers examined the diets and coronary artery conditions of 235 women in the United States with an average age of 66.
At the study’s inception, researchers took X-rays of 10 locations along each woman's coronary arteries, wherein all subjects were found to have some measure of plaque buildup. The women kept comprehensive records of the foods they ate and in what amounts, including the types of oils they used for frying and baking. At the end of the three year period, researchers then took a second set of X-rays.

It was found that women who had regularly eaten the highest amounts of saturated fats had the least amount of additional plaque buildup in their arteries. Also, women who ate more saturated fats had a healthier balance of good and bad cholesterols and more desirable blood concentrations of various kinds of fats. Factors such as age, education, smoking habits, and use of medication were accounted for by the researchers

The Real Problem
So if it's not the saturated fat from those steaks and burgers we Americans love so much that's causing the rise in heart disease and obesity, then what is? Believe it or not, it's the "heart-healthy" oils like canola that are doing much of the damage. When these oils are heated, they convert into trans fats and also produce large amounts of free radicals.

These trans-fats are 97% positively correlated with arterial plaque and experts are now suggesting that trans-fats are responsible for between 30,000 and 100,000 heart disease deaths per year. Harvard researchers are calling trans-fats "the biggest food processing disaster in U.S. history."
Yeah, I've seen a couple of those studies. I actually tend to agree more with their findings. Smaller portions couldn't hurt I guess.

One study I read was by a Cardiologist. In his study, he found something like 5 groups of indigenous people around the world that their only source for fat was animal fats. Heart disease was almost nonexistent in those populations.
 
#8
I have lost 198 pounds and kept it off over 8 years. Turned out to be a thyroid malady, but it's been removed. Doing well these days, however,...along the way my endocrinologist has advised me if it comes off a hog, don't eat it. My Saturday mornings usually start with bacon, eggs, and yellow hominy grits. Turkey bacon tastes better to me these days than the real thing. Much leaner. Life without pork isn't bad at all. I'm much healthier today, and consume meat about once a week. Never realized how delicious well prepared fruits and vegtables are. Can remember when I'd be insulted to sit at the table with no meat. Truth is I'm learning I feel better if I eat less of it.
 

Paymaster

Q Cookin, Fly Tyin, Mod
#9
I think this falls under the don't ask don't tell protection act :rofl::rofl: This will probably get an amen from at least one of the mods of this forum:hair:
:D:D:D

I have been on BP meds for 15 years. I eat more pork now than when I was placed on them. My BP problems are inherited. Now that I am on BP and heart meds, my BP is normal,my Cholesterol is in great shape, and my heart capacity, though diminished because of the blood clot related attack, is steady and unchanged for the last 7 years.
 
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