Predator calls for black bear.

Thread starter #1
Has anyone used predator calls while hunting black bear? I have read several articles in which the author(s) utilized calls such as a fawn in distress and a wounded rabbit to lure black bears in. Most of the articles were written by folks hunting out west and I have found little written about experiences of hunters utilizing calls in the southeast. I am pondering getting some calls (non-electronic) and giving it a go during the early part of the season. As this will be my first foray into bear hunting I do not want to waste my time with fruitless techniques.

I am curious to see if anybody in our area has used them and if there was any success? Or, if you think it is "baloney" I would love to hear your rationale as well. I performed a search of the forums and did not find anything there. If this topic has already been discussed I apologize and would be greatful for direction to the threads.
 
Last edited:
#2
Has anyone used predator calls while hunting black bear? I have read several articles in which the author(s) utilized calls such as a fawn in distress and a wounded rabbit to lure black bears in. Most of the articles were written by folks hunting out west and I have found little written about experiences of hunters utilizing calls in the southeast. I am pondering getting some calls (non-electronic) and giving it a go during the early part of the season. As this will be my first foray into bear hunting I do not want to waste my time with fruitless techniques.

I am curious to see if anybody in our area have used them and if there was any success? Or, if you think it is "baloney" I would love to hear your rationale as well. I performed a search of the forums and did not find anything there. If this topic has already been discussed I apologize and would be greatful for direction to the threads.
I haven't personally tried it, but from what I have read from people on here it mostly pulls in coyotes. Like I said, don't take my word, but that's what I've seen people on here say.
 
Thread starter #4
why not try it in the off season? if it works, shouldn't be only productive in the fall
That's not a bad idea. I figure when it gets a dash closer to when season comes in and it is small game season I could give it a go. If a yote shows up then he gets sorted out and becomes some material for fly tying. If a bear shows up hopefully he wont be too terribly disappointed that it was false advertising.
 
#5
That's not a bad idea. I figure when it gets a dash closer to when season comes in and it is small game season I could give it a go. If a yote shows up then he gets sorted out and becomes some material for fly tying. If a bear shows up hopefully he wont be too terribly disappointed that it was false advertising.
Yeah even if it brings in a yote that's not necessarily a bad thing
 

gregj

Senior Member
#7
I think you might want to be where you can see a long
ways if you are gonna try it for Bear. The last thing i would want is to be sitting by a tree in the forest and have a Bear coming in looking for lunch and not being able to see him from afar.
 
#8
I have tried it long ago with a dying rabbit squeal (all I had at the time) with zero results. I have read that it works better in the spring when there are not as many food sources available. Several Western states have spring bear seasons. I dont know if I'd try this casually without a weapon in my hand. A bear charging in with its predatory instincts in control could lead to serious consequences. Maybe if there were two of you.
 
Thread starter #9
What a lot of the articles suggested is NOT doing this alone as it just is not safe. Two folks where you've got 360 coverage is necessary.
 
#10
I think you might want to be where you can see a long
ways if you are gonna try it for Bear. The last thing i would want is to be sitting by a tree in the forest and have a Bear coming in looking for lunch and not being able to see him from afar.
I have tried it long ago with a dying rabbit squeal (all I had at the time) with zero results. I have read that it works better in the spring when there are not as many food sources available. Several Western states have spring bear seasons. I dont know if I'd try this casually without a weapon in my hand. A bear charging in with its predatory instincts in control could lead to serious consequences. Maybe if there were two of you.
What a lot of the articles suggested is NOT doing this alone as it just is not safe. Two folks where you've got 360 coverage is necessary.
Back in the day when we were teenagers, my cousin and his buddy got ahold of a Johnny Stewart predator calling 8-track tape. They wanted to try it out, so one night they pulled off an overlook on the Blue Ridge Parkway, plugged that sucker in the tape player, cranked the windows down and the volume up. They were just settling back to see what happened when a big bear came out of the woods, put them back in the truck, and scratched half the paint off the buddy's truck trying to get in it. They left. That's the only experience I've know of anybody calling bears with a predator call. :)
 
#11
Back when we were in high school, me and a buddy used to really lay the law down on predators like foxes and bobcats around here. We would set up and call with rabbit squealers or a mouse squeaker and listen for footsteps in the leaves if we were in the woods, or would periodically shine and look for eyes if we were in a field.

One night we set up in a brush pile in the edge of a hayfield and commenced to calling. It was a bright, moonlit night and we could see very well. After the first sequence of calling, we heard a grunt/snort below us and soon enough, we could see a large black shape coming our way. :hair:

I was armed with a Remington Speedmaster 552, loaded up with CCI Stingers and my buddy probably had a Ruger 10/22 loaded with the same. We had a 6 cell Maglite between us. As this giant bear came closer, it got bigger and bigger, and we could hear its heavy breathing. With a sideways glance and whispered instructions, we decided to turn the light on and fill that bear's head full of lead.

On the count of 3, I flicked on the light to illuminate the target. With rifles raised and ready, we were staring at a black angus bull that had come to check us out.

I don't know about calling bears during our fall/winter season, but it definitely works on cattle. :biggrin2:
 
Thread starter #12
Back in the day when we were teenagers, my cousin and his buddy got ahold of a Johnny Stewart predator calling 8-track tape. They wanted to try it out, so one night they pulled off an overlook on the Blue Ridge Parkway, plugged that sucker in the tape player, cranked the windows down and the volume up. They were just settling back to see what happened when a big bear came out of the woods, put them back in the truck, and scratched half the paint off the buddy's truck trying to get in it. They left. That's the only experience I've know of anybody calling bears with a predator call. :)
That brought a much needed laugh today.
 
#13
Back when we were in high school, me and a buddy used to really lay the law down on predators like foxes and bobcats around here. We would set up and call with rabbit squealers or a mouse squeaker and listen for footsteps in the leaves if we were in the woods, or would periodically shine and look for eyes if we were in a field.

One night we set up in a brush pile in the edge of a hayfield and commenced to calling. It was a bright, moonlit night and we could see very well. After the first sequence of calling, we heard a grunt/snort below us and soon enough, we could see a large black shape coming our way. :hair:

I was armed with a Remington Speedmaster 552, loaded up with CCI Stingers and my buddy probably had a Ruger 10/22 loaded with the same. We had a 6 cell Maglite between us. As this giant bear came closer, it got bigger and bigger, and we could hear its heavy breathing. With a sideways glance and whispered instructions, we decided to turn the light on and fill that bear's head full of lead.

On the count of 3, I flicked on the light to illuminate the target. With rifles raised and ready, we were staring at a black angus bull that had come to check us out.

I don't know about calling bears during our fall/winter season, but it definitely works on cattle. :biggrin2:
:rofl:
 
#14
Back when we were in high school, me and a buddy used to really lay the law down on predators like foxes and bobcats around here. We would set up and call with rabbit squealers or a mouse squeaker and listen for footsteps in the leaves if we were in the woods, or would periodically shine and look for eyes if we were in a field.

One night we set up in a brush pile in the edge of a hayfield and commenced to calling. It was a bright, moonlit night and we could see very well. After the first sequence of calling, we heard a grunt/snort below us and soon enough, we could see a large black shape coming our way. :hair:

I was armed with a Remington Speedmaster 552, loaded up with CCI Stingers and my buddy probably had a Ruger 10/22 loaded with the same. We had a 6 cell Maglite between us. As this giant bear came closer, it got bigger and bigger, and we could hear its heavy breathing. With a sideways glance and whispered instructions, we decided to turn the light on and fill that bear's head full of lead.

On the count of 3, I flicked on the light to illuminate the target. With rifles raised and ready, we were staring at a black angus bull that had come to check us out.

I don't know about calling bears during our fall/winter season, but it definitely works on cattle. :biggrin2:
made me laugh this morning
 

zedex

Senior Member
#15
Ive tried using calls in my area. No sucess even though i am in the right area. Even fresh footprints in myd right after the rain. Here, we have the densest population of black bear in the world -- over 12000 of them on this small island.
I have noticed when the call is set to fawn bleats, deer come running. Baiting for deer is legal here but not for bear.
We are in the middle of spring bear and cougar season. Ive wasted many hours using the call. Now im packing my 45-70 and walking into the bush.
 
Top