Privacy bush

Elkbane

Senior Member
Looks like thorny Eleagnus, and as Elkbane said, it's nasty and invasive. Get some kind of native or non-invasive plant for a screen. Eastern red cedar is a good screening plant.
 
Thread starter #5
I've noticed after cleaning up a fence line that it's growing there in spots. I've got a place about 300 foot that I'm wanting to put on the property line where someone bought a spot next to me
 

Triple C

Senior Member
Wax Myrtle is a native species that makes a good screen if you keep it pruned.
I'd vote for wax myrtle as well. Native to the SE and given proper sunlight, makes an awesome screen within 4 to 5 years. We planted bare root seedlings in 2012 at entrance to property and it's now pushing 15 ft in height. I'll try and remember to take a pic next time down.
 
I'd vote for wax myrtle as well. Native to the SE and given proper sunlight, makes an awesome screen within 4 to 5 years. We planted bare root seedlings in 2012 at entrance to property and it's now pushing 15 ft in height. I'll try and remember to take a pic next time down.
Yep, if you're where it's warm enough for it to grow, it's a good plant to use.
 
Thread starter #12
I've already dug up and move 32 cedars and half didn't make it. Not sure if the difference in soil types done it or just the stress but they turned brown.
 
Ugly Agnes= No good

How high are you looking for?
That’s what I called it one summer I actually had to climb a ladder to walk and lay on top of it to trim it down back to a loooong wall two years in a row.
The lady had been growing it for decades and loved it. I begged her for years to cut it down to the ground and spray it with roundup. When she died her grandchildren had rented a bobcat and then needed a bulldozer brought in to get rid of it. Today it still try’s to grow back. NASTY BUSH!!! Bamboo forest that would hold pandas on the other side. Those are gone now too. You can thank her if you have either pop up in your yard in Atlanta. She had them both imported.
 
I've already dug up and move 32 cedars and half didn't make it. Not sure if the difference in soil types done it or just the stress but they turned brown.
Be sure that you don't plant them deeper than they were originally growing. It'll kill them quick.
 
Nellie R Steven Hollie or Viburnum make excellent screen plants.
 
Thread starter #17
That was the main thing I watched when I moved them. All of them turned a brownish color for a couple days and some came back green and some didn't. A couple looked sure nuff dead but I've noticed the tips turning green the past few weeks. I figured they didn't like being transferred from red clay to a sandy loam dirt
 
That was the main thing I watched when I moved them. All of them turned a brownish color for a couple days and some came back green and some didn't. A couple looked sure nuff dead but I've noticed the tips turning green the past few weeks. I figured they didn't like being transferred from red clay to a sandy loam dirt
Cedars prefer sandy loam to clay, as long as they get water until they're established. Watering them in good when you plant them is important, like ten gallons or so on every one. It will also help fill any air pockets that were left in the soil around them. The time of year you transplant them makes a difference, too. Just before they start growing in early spring is best.
 
Clumping bamboo does not spread

You can also use Camellia or like Jim said any Holly will work fine. Just keep in mind but it will take a long time for anything to put any height on it so don't buy something that's knee-high expecting privacy in a couple of years
 
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