Question on bareshaft tuning

Thread starter #1
I understand the basics of bareshaft tuning my arrows, what I don't quite get, though, is how to physically do it with a wooden shaft that involves glue-on point and nock. If the idea is to start with a longer than needed shaft and systematically remove length until the spine is just right, how can I do this if I have to glue the nock and the point onto either end? What am I missing?
 

Fatboy

Senior Member
Most people advise against bare shaft tuning wood arrows. If they are not really close you will probably break them if they hit at an angle.
 
Thread starter #3
They are close. I'm recreating a set I already shoot, but happen to be a little on the stuff side. Given my options for weakening the spine, my best bet is to replicate everything except make them slightly longer - I'm just not sure how much longer.
 

Todd Cook

Senior Member
I don't recomend bareshafting wood usually. I've done it, and I've broke arrows doing it too. If you do, you leave the nock alone and trim the point end. Use a hot melt glue and trim them maybe 1/4" and try them, repeating as needed.

You said they were close. If so I'll tell you a better way. With feathers on, glue on a decent sized broadhead and shoot them from 20-30 yards at a safe backstop. If they're too stiff they'll tend to fly ok but will drift left, and farther left the longer you shoot.( for a right hander). If they're weak they won't fly well at all. When they're correct they'll shoot where you want em to.
 

Clipper

Senior Member
I don't recomend bareshafting wood usually. I've done it, and I've broke arrows doing it too. If you do, you leave the nock alone and trim the point end. Use a hot melt glue and trim them maybe 1/4" and try them, repeating as needed.

You said they were close. If so I'll tell you a better way. With feathers on, glue on a decent sized broadhead and shoot them from 20-30 yards at a safe backstop. If they're too stiff they'll tend to fly ok but will drift left, and farther left the longer you shoot.( for a right hander). If they're weak they won't fly well at all. When they're correct they'll shoot where you want em to.
Todd, thanks for the tip. I've been sanding on a set that were too stiff for my weaker bow, trying to weaken the shaft. I'm getting close. If I shoot 3 arrows with practice points and work on the one with a broadhead until it hits with the practice arrows I should be good? I've got 2 practice arrows that shoot with no porpoising or fishtailing.
 
I have never bare shaft tuned wood arrows, if you are ordering custom wood arrows the arrow smith should be able to get you what you need.

You can then take out the fish tailing and porposing with nock, brace height of strike plate adjustment.
 
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