R-POD

Thread starter #1
Wife has been retired for 2 years. House and vehicles, boat all paid off. I am retired military but worked for the past 8 years in a corporate owned hospital as Director of Nutrition. Told them as of December will be calling it quits. We were looking for a used or new class C motorhome but decided we did not want the hassle of having to drag a car behind us to see the sights. Also the storage when not using would be costly, our neighborhood has regulations on what can be parked in your driveway. was looking at tips on the internet on what to look for when purchasing and came across one guy and his family who recorded their travels in a pull behind R- POD. this thing has an amazing amount of features that we are looking for. Just wondering if anyone owns one and how you like it. Thanks
 

Oldstick

Senior Member
Don't own one but we considered them when we were looking to "upgrade" from our Coleman pop-up tent trailer. We even looked at one almost new for sale in our area. They are very nice, but we were thinking the space sure was cramped compared to what we were used to in even the pop-up.
 
Thread starter #3
We saw one on internet which had twin beds and another with a queen. Guess the amenities come with a price. Looking for a dealer close so we can get a real look. Thanks for your input
 

bany

Senior Member
What kind of space you can be comfortable in is probably the most important factor. How long your trips are and the weather factor in to the size too.
 

Oldstick

Senior Member
There's a company called TrailManor that makes a fold down RV, with all hard sides, no canvas. Plus all of the amenities, bathroom, kitchen etc. At least a couple of their models are designed to fit inside a standard 20 foot garage.

They then open up into a very spacious RV with all floor space in the center while the beds being extended spaces similar to a pop-up. The folded down height is about 5 or 6 feet, making them easier to tow, probably similar to the RPOD.
 
There's a company called TrailManor that makes a fold down RV, with all hard sides, no canvas. Plus all of the amenities, bathroom, kitchen etc. At least a couple of their models are designed to fit inside a standard 20 foot garage.

They then open up into a very spacious RV with all floor space in the center while the beds being extended spaces similar to a pop-up. The folded down height is about 5 or 6 feet, making them easier to tow, probably similar to the RPOD.
Hi-Lo is another option to TrailManor. Between those two TrailManor looks roomier.
 

normaldave

Senior Member
If the R-Pod size trailer is a consideration, I'd include Winnebago's Minnie Drop in your search.

Winnebago bought the former Sunnybrook RV to get into the towables business. Sunnybrook was near the top of the RV game when the recession hit. Winnebago appears to have kept a fair amount of Sunnybrook design features and build quality.

You may have to get to Jacksonville to see more than one, but they offer several key features over/above Forest River's R-Pod. BAL frame, gelcoat fiberglass exterior, all features just a bit better. Now Winnebago clearly borrowed from the R-Pod design, but I think they "upgraded" it a bit.

Walk through video:

Example:
Used 2018 Drop 1790 Realtree edition

Hey, Military Heritage edition on sale!
New '18 Minnie Drop Military Edition

Also be sure you have more than enough tow vehicle capacity to handle the trailer. Many recommend keeping the loaded trailer weight near about 80% of maximum tow capacity for the tow vehicle to stay on the conservative side.

I echo the concerns of Class C and another vehicle in tow. As nice as the C's are, being able to leave the trailer at the campsite, and take the tow rig to explore local areas is really nice. Having to drag an extra vehicle along, just doesn't make sense to me. I've told my wife if you ever catch me studying a class C or A motorhome, slap me on the back of the head! (no offense). :stir:

I've also read numerous comments that show the tendency of motor coach (A and C owners) tend to spend a majority of time inside the coach while camping, whereas trailer owners tend to spend more time outside enjoying the outdoors. Don't know if that is a space issue or luxury issue, but interesting.

Consider what you will be doing for entertainment while camping, cooking inside vs. outside, pets, hiking, biking, sitting around the fire, etc. and make your trailer choice to best support your intended activities.
 
Last edited:
If the R-Pod size trailer is a consideration, I'd include Winnebago's Minnie Drop in your search.

Winnebago bought the former Sunnybrook RV to get into the towables business. Sunnybrook was near the top of the RV game when the recession hit. Winnebago appears to have kept a fair amount of Sunnybrook design features and build quality.

You may have to get to Jacksonville to see more than one, but they offer several key features over/above Forest River's R-Pod. BAL frame, gelcoat fiberglass exterior, all features just a bit better. Now Winnebago clearly borrowed from the R-Pod design, but I think they "upgraded" it a bit.

Walk through video:

Example:
Used 2018 Drop 1790 Realtree edition

Hey, Military Heritage edition on sale!
New '18 Minnie Drop Military Edition

Also be sure you have more than enough tow vehicle capacity to handle the trailer. Many recommend keeping the loaded trailer weight near about 80% of maximum tow capacity for the tow vehicle to stay on the conservative side.

I echo the concerns of Class C and another vehicle in tow. As nice as the C's are, being able to leave the trailer at the campsite, and take the tow rig to explore local areas is really nice. Having to drag an extra vehicle along, just doesn't make sense to me. I've told my wife if you ever catch me studying a class C or A motorhome, slap me on the back of the head! (no offense). :stir:

I've also read numerous comments that show the tendency of motor coach (A and C owners) tend to spend a majority of time inside the coach while camping, whereas trailer owners tend to spend more time outside enjoying the outdoors. Don't know if that is a space issue or luxury issue, but interesting.

Consider what you will be doing for entertainment while camping, cooking inside vs. outside, pets, hiking, biking, sitting around the fire, etc. and make your trailer choice to best support your intended activities.
Thanks, I was wondering if there was any competition with the R-pods. Can you think of any more? For some reason they remind me of bigger teardrops.
 
Regarding class C motor homes, my parents traveled all over the place in theirs. Long multi-month trips to Canada, etc. They never towed a car just driving the motor home all through downtown adventures. Meaning not having a car didn't stop them from sightseeing. Sometimes we'd all go sightseeing for the day in the motor home.

That being said, I guess it depends on how you view the pros and cons. They never had to hook up a tow vehicle or trailer. Never had to worry about towing capacity. Class C got them in most campsites.

The biggest con would be if one was like a Lake camper. You need to run to Walmart and you got to unhook the power, let down the awning, and run everyone out of the camper.

My Dad never hooked up the potable water hose or sewer hose. Preferring to always top off the water and empty at the dump station. Half the time he wouldn't even level the camper or let the awning out. I guess he was a minimumest.

So when he got to a campground, his only chore was to hook up the shore power.
 
Last edited:
My wife and I have a 2016 Rpod, model 172. We love it. Easy to tow, set up and ours has a slide out that gives us much more room inside. I'm sure you know, but they have an add on tent room that attaches to the pod. Doubles your space. It is just right for 2 people. We take our 2 oldest grandsons with us sometimes. Gets just a little crowded with 4 people, but for you and your wife, it would be great. Also, easy to pull in, or, back in to a camping spot. Gives you more options of parking at a campground that may have some 20 ft. camping spots. We like to sight see quite a bit when we camp, so, I would never own a motor home where I had to pull a car. Too much weight and length on the highway. Also, without pulling a vehicle, you are pretty much stuck at the campground, unless you want to unhook everything and tour in the motorhome. For me, that would be miserable. I can only speak for the R-pod. There are several competitors out there and I am sure they are good. But our R-pod suites us just fine. Happy camping....
 

shdw633

Senior Member
My wife and I are looking at C-class motorhomes as well and I looked at a similar type unit as the R-pod and the only thing I will add is the same thing I told my wife while we were looking. Don't look at it through the eyes of someone sitting by the campfire on a beautiful day, look at it through the eyes of someone that has to sit in it for three straight days due to rain. If you feel there is enough room to endure that, then you have your RV. We currently own a 36 foot fifth wheel and have thought about downsizing it for more portability. On a side note, I would like to have one of those R-pod RV's for running around the country deer hunting!! Would save a bunch in hotel rooms!!
 
Top