Red Clover

Thread starter #1

Canuck5

Senior Member
Since in another thread, the discussion of Red Clover was brought up and it's now part of my own personal mix, I thought I would add this. Red clover will get taller and put more tonnage on than white clover, which is great for a farmer who is baling it for cattle. From my experience, my deer love the leaves of the red clover and although they have eaten the stems, it's not like white clover. My deer view the white clover as "everything is leaf", and eat it all. I think the medium red clover adds a lot from it's ability to withstand drier summers, has a deeper root system and does benefit the soil. I think it adds a lot, in a mix.

http://animal.ifas.ufl.edu/beef_extension/reports/2015/docs/i_21_dubeux_red-clover.pdf

Single cut / multi-cut red clover

https://www.sare.org/Learning-Cente...on/Text-Version/Legume-Cover-Crops/Red-Clover

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OmenHonkey

Senior Member
Ok, so i have a cart on Hancock seed company's page.

I Have :
Medium Red Clover
Ladino
Yuchi Arrowleaf
Dixie Reseeding Crimson

Hows that look for a mixture?
 

Crakajak

Senior Member
DEPENDS on the soil type you have:
From eastern Texas and Oklahoma across the south to the Atlantic coast and north along a line from Macon, GA to Dallas, TX. Also, on loamier soils in the Coastal Plain region of the Southeastern U.S., the Pacific Northwest and in river valleys and certain irrigated areas of the western U.S. Benefits: Durana is a perennial plant that offers year round sustainable and low maintenance :
 
Thread starter #6

Canuck5

Senior Member
If you remove the Ladino and add a cereal grain, radishes & turnips, you've got a great fall annual plot. It should carry your thru to the following fall, or just about.

If you choose one of the Florida clovers (since you're so much father south) and add Durana, (+ a cereal grain this fall) you'll have a killer perennial plot. Just make sure your weeds are under control and your ph is above 6.

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OmenHonkey

Senior Member
I've planted clover before years ago. Just don't remember the variety. And i have had crimson in my orchards but quit doing that.
 
Thread starter #8

Canuck5

Senior Member
And remember to do your math!!! :)

The blends I posted above, pertain to PLS (pure live seed), so if you buy innoculated clover you have to make allowances. On the tag below, we have a total of 4 pounds in the bag, with 34% inert coating and only 85% germination rate.

So 4 x (1-.34) x .85 = 2.244 pounds of pure live seed in that bag. So, if your seeding rate is 5 pounds per acre, you need to buy 2 bags (well, you'd be a little under at 4.488 pounds). It's important to get the seeding rate right, otherwise we can be disappointed.

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OmenHonkey

Senior Member
And remember to do your math!!! :)

The blends I posted above, pertain to PLS (pure live seed), so if you buy innoculated clover you have to make allowances. On the tag below, we have a total of 4 pounds in the bag, with 34% inert coating and only 85% germination rate.

So 4 x (1-.34) x .85 = 2.244 pounds of pure live seed in that bag. So, if your seeding rate is 5 pounds per acre, you need to buy 2 bags (well, you'd be a little under at 4.488 pounds). It's important to get the seeding rate right, otherwise we can be disappointed.

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Wait so you mean a 5lb bag of "Clover seed" only has 2.5 lbs of actual seed in it? I was gonna buy the arrowleaf and ladino and plant this spring simply by mixing them up and putting them in my drill. (As long as it has a setting for it) And plant a few plots. Otherwise i will use a small seed hand spreader and hope for the best. Then drag and cultipack.
 
Thread starter #10

Canuck5

Senior Member
Well, you can buy pure seed and then innoculate it yourself, prior to planting. Then you just have to consider the germination rate in your calculations. It just depends on what is available to you.

You can plant this spring and clover will germinate and you might do just fine. The negatives to planting in the spring, is competition from the weeds who are just waiting to jump out of the ground. Add to that, the expensive ladino clovers spend their early days establishing their roots and very little above ground. If we have a hot summer, sometimes that clover won't make it.

Every bag of seed might be a little different.

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SRShunter

Senior Member
Seems like there is so much to growing clover. I'm sure I'm making a mountain out of a mole hill, but it doesn't seem as easy as iron clay peas. Think I'm just going to try some Bob type clovers and hope for the best in my cereal grains and brassicas this fall. Wish I had about 3 of yall clover guys holding me by the hand when I purchase and plant clover
 
Thread starter #12

Canuck5

Senior Member
LOL, well, it really isn't that hard ..... I wished I could plant cowpeas, but after 5 acres were wiped out, I went with clover.
 
Wait so you mean a 5lb bag of "Clover seed" only has 2.5 lbs of actual seed in it? I was gonna buy the arrowleaf and ladino and plant this spring simply by mixing them up and putting them in my drill. (As long as it has a setting for it) And plant a few plots. Otherwise i will use a small seed hand spreader and hope for the best. Then drag and cultipack.
Germination is an antiquated term and has nothing to do with seedling mortality. Coatings have decreased plant mortality by increasing root growth. At the same time helping to hold seed costs down by increasing supply for a given demand. I was fortunate to get into the industry prior to coatings being introduced and we have seen no change in stand density due to coatings. Perhaps better.

One other thing - cultipack before seeding and let God push it in with his rainfall.
 
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