Red Wolf Madness

HunterJoe24

Senior Member
Heck no. That money could go to many other species that would actually benefit from it. The problem with today's "save all species" way of ecology is that they forget some species just die off naturally. There's not really any ecological benefit that I know of for the red wolves to stay around. As much as it may suck for some, some species are just meant to die off like Mammoths, sabertooths and dinosaurs just to name a few.
 
Heck no. That money could go to many other species that would actually benefit from it. The problem with today's "save all species" way of ecology is that they forget some species just die off naturally. There's not really any ecological benefit that I know of for the red wolves to stay around. As much as it may suck for some, some species are just meant to die off like Mammoths, sabertooths and dinosaurs just to name a few.
The difference is that red wolves were driven to near extinction very quickly by humans, not some natural event. While I recognize we'll never have a major population of red wolves in the SE, letting the species go extinct is unacceptable. Go read about some of the species that went extinct within the last century, it's sad that no one will ever get to lay eyes on any of them again. Carolina parakeet, passenger pigeon, ivory-billed woodpecker, tasmanian tiger, eastern cougar, heath hen, and eastern elk.
 

Throwback

Senior Member
The difference is that red wolves were driven to near extinction very quickly by humans, not some natural event. While I recognize we'll never have a major population of red wolves in the SE, letting the species go extinct is unacceptable. Go read about some of the species that went extinct within the last century, it's sad that no one will ever get to lay eyes on any of them again. Carolina parakeet, passenger pigeon, ivory-billed woodpecker, tasmanian tiger, eastern cougar, heath hen, and eastern elk.
you gone and done it now! :rofl:
 
The difference is that red wolves were driven to near extinction very quickly by humans, not some natural event. While I recognize we'll never have a major population of red wolves in the SE, letting the species go extinct is unacceptable. Go read about some of the species that went extinct within the last century, it's sad that no one will ever get to lay eyes on any of them again. Carolina parakeet, passenger pigeon, ivory-billed woodpecker, tasmanian tiger, eastern cougar, heath hen, and eastern elk.
Yeah it does suck that the wolves were almost wiped out by humans. But when it comes to wolves, there's a pretty good reason why they were hunted so hard in the settling days. Look at what the reintroduction of wolves has done to ranchers and other wildlife in the west. They are wiping everything out. Yes, it sucks that we wiped them out, and yes, it's not exactly "right" to put a pricetag on an animal that was driven out by us, but millions of taxpayer dollars on just a few animals left. That money could go to much more useful projects to help protect our wildlife and preserve nature.
 

Jake Allen

Administrator
Yeah it does suck that the wolves were almost wiped out by humans. But when it comes to wolves, there's a pretty good reason why they were hunted so hard in the settling days. Look at what the reintroduction of wolves has done to ranchers and other wildlife in the west. They are wiping everything out. Yes, it sucks that we wiped them out, and yes, it's not exactly "right" to put a pricetag on an animal that was driven out by us, but millions of taxpayer dollars on just a few animals left. That money could go to much more useful projects to help protect our wildlife and preserve nature.
Spot on :cool:
 
Yeah it does suck that the wolves were almost wiped out by humans. But when it comes to wolves, there's a pretty good reason why they were hunted so hard in the settling days. Look at what the reintroduction of wolves has done to ranchers and other wildlife in the west. They are wiping everything out. Yes, it sucks that we wiped them out, and yes, it's not exactly "right" to put a pricetag on an animal that was driven out by us, but millions of taxpayer dollars on just a few animals left. That money could go to much more useful projects to help protect our wildlife and preserve nature.
I've got no problem managing wolves, but our predecessors were wrong to totally eradicate predators. I'm not sure what figures you're looking at, but what I saw said 1.2 million per year to run the red wolf program. That's really not as much as you think considering each state probably spends 40 to 60 times that each year on wildlife. I'm sure it probably could be managed better, but I find that to be a nominal price tag to prevent the extinction of another species.
 
The problems from what I've heard from people who live down there are that they keep interbreeding with coyotes, and the .gov is severely restricting people's use of their own land around the ARWR because wolves/wolf/coyote hybrids range on their land.
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
I've got no problem managing wolves, but our predecessors were wrong to totally eradicate predators. I'm not sure what figures you're looking at, but what I saw said 1.2 million per year to run the red wolf program. That's really not as much as you think considering each state probably spends 40 to 60 times that each year on wildlife. I'm sure it probably could be managed better, but I find that to be a nominal price tag to prevent the extinction of another species.


I agree with you, Charlie.
 
I've got no problem managing wolves, but our predecessors were wrong to totally eradicate predators. I'm not sure what figures you're looking at, but what I saw said 1.2 million per year to run the red wolf program. That's really not as much as you think considering each state probably spends 40 to 60 times that each year on wildlife. I'm sure it probably could be managed better, but I find that to be a nominal price tag to prevent the extinction of another species.
I think I read it as 12. must've missed the dot in 1.2. But still, that's 1.2 million that could go to hog eradication and coyote eradication, both non-natives that are hurting native populations of everything. 1.2 million is plenty of money to restore the species if they really wanted to. So I don't know what they're spending it on, but if it takes them over a million dollars of taxpayer dollars to keep a couple of animals alive, and they're still somehow not restoring the population then it is definitely not worth it.
 
I think I read it as 12. must've missed the dot in 1.2. But still, that's 1.2 million that could go to hog eradication and coyote eradication, both non-natives that are hurting native populations of everything. 1.2 million is plenty of money to restore the species if they really wanted to. So I don't know what they're spending it on, but if it takes them over a million dollars of taxpayer dollars to keep a couple of animals alive, and they're still somehow not restoring the population then it is definitely not worth it.
I do wish we had more funding for hog control, but it's better to keep something you can never get back than try to eradicate something we're likely to never get rid of.
 
I believe everything has a right to exist. To everyone on here saying just let them go extinct and what purpose do they serve. I would say the same thing about every other living creature on earth. Both plant and animal. Just because you dont like or see the need. God put them on this planet for some reason and if they go extinct through natural selection that's what happens. But as was said earlier, they are being forced to extinction partially because of humans. Just as Right Whales. I feel we owe it to every species to give them the chance to survive.
Heck I see a lot of posts on here of how beautiful snakes are and I would just assume there were none of them. So does that mean we should do away with trying to save the Indigo snakes? There are tons of money spent on them, as well as Quail. So why is one species worth more than anther.
That is like saying your life is worth more than mine.
 
History of Red Wolf

The American Red Wolf is a human friendly animalthat were kept as pets by Indian Tribes in Louisiana. When the Spaniards came to America they brought the Spanish Mastiff which bred with the American Red Wold and resulted in a breed of dog known as the Louisiana Catahoula. The Red Wolf is much smaller than the North American Timber Wolf. Does everyone realize that in the entire history of North America there are absolutely no reports of wolves attacking humans??? Well its true!!! Unfortunately the Red Wolf looks very much like a coyote and being smaller than other wolves is mistaken as a coyote often.
 
I think the red wolf is worth saving. I also think that the USFWS has blatantly lied to and screwed over the people of eastern NC in the process of their project. They tried it here in the Smokies with the same results. Now we have no red wolves here, but we have 50 lb red and black coyotes that howl in low F#m.
 
I think the red wolf is worth saving. I also think that the USFWS has blatantly lied to and screwed over the people of eastern NC in the process of their project. They tried it here in the Smokies with the same results. Now we have no red wolves here, but we have 50 lb red and black coyotes that howl in low F#m.
that's exactly what eastern nc people say, along with the game wardens of nc. as well as the wildlife commissioners
 
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