retriever trainers whos the best?

#26
You know you got good and bad.

Yep a couple listed in the thread that look like dogs were unprepared for the work they were supposed to be doing.
Allot of folks have never seen a well trained hunting dog and just cause a dog has tons of training does not make him a goo hunting dog. I had a dog once that was a great trial dog. Not hunt test dog trial dog. He was 2 points away from his FC. The year was 87-88 and fishing creek was full of Mallards. The dog flared more birds than I could count because he would bark at the birds as they worked. Some time Fld trial training and hunt test training can not replace time in the blind.Turkey trax is so right when he says you should know your trainer before you send your dog to him or her. Another hard truth is that not every dog has what it takes . Dogs can be from the best blood lines out there and still turn out to be nothing. Be ready to get rid of a dog that can not do his job. Some you can train till the end of time and they will never turn out.
 

DukTruk

Senior Member
#29
I don't disagree with watching them run at HT. The only problem is that most new folks don't know what to look for or look at during the tests. Just because the dogs can't "do the work" for that particular test doesn't mean that the trainer isn't any good. Dogs have bad days just like us. The biggest thing to look for is "how" the dogs run.
 
#30
I don't disagree with watching them run at HT. The only problem is that most new folks don't know what to look for or look at during the tests. Just because the dogs can't "do the work" for that particular test doesn't mean that the trainer isn't any good. Dogs have bad days just like us. The biggest thing to look for is "how" the dogs run.
I see your point. I think its more about watching the dog and the trainer together. There are dogs running test that arent ready and a trainer can only give his advice. If the client wants to run the dog then they will, but if the dog isnt ready it shows. But I think you can get alot more useful info hanging around a hunt test or with them when they're training. Either way your gut is usually right:bounce:
 

DukTruk

Senior Member
#31
The big advantage is that you can usually see multiple pros in one spot. Especially at a larger test or trial. And you're right, there are some folks that just want the pro to run their dog, and some of the pros do.
 
#32
This is so true.

The big advantage is that you can usually see multiple pros in one spot. Especially at a larger test or trial. And you're right, there are some folks that just want the pro to run their dog, and some of the pros do.
Great post.
 

rholton

Senior Member
#33
A lot of good posts here. Brad Arington gets my vote as well. He usually has higher master pass rates than most at hunt tests. He is also usually running some of the youngest dogs at the tests he attends. Some of that is good dogs, but a lot of it is good training. I know for a fact that he master titled/qualified three dogs this year that were between 24 - 30 months old...mine being one of them.
He is a great guy and only an hour from you so it would be easier for you to spend time with him and your dog...which I HIGHLY recommend. Do Not just drop the dog off and then come pick it up when it is ready.
 

rholton

Senior Member
#35
I will have to look. He came from Mike Keen in Hoboken. Brad found him for me. He is out of FC, MH and HRCH stock. He was out of training for three months this summer due to some surgery and still should have finished his titles in February...had some mishaps along the way.
 
#36
Chris Akin, Web Footed Kennels, Jonesboro Arkansas. His track record is undeniable both AKC and UKC. He runs a tight kennel and has more results for MH, HRCH, and QAA dogs. Some of the best HT blood lines come from his kennel.
 
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