Shark Teeth

From what I've read you don't find the big stuff on the beach. We were at Hilton Head and went to the Sand's beach at Port Royal. My daughter has an eye for them.

I was reading about sharks teeth in the areas and read a bit about finding Megalodon and other fossils in the rivers. I'm not sure why there is more in the rivers than in the ocean around these parts.

Girl finds one on the banks of the May River;

https://www.islandpacket.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/untamed-lowcountry/article116657848.html

Couple black water diving in the Cooper River. The current is so strong you have to jab a screwdriver in the bottom to keep from drifting away.

https://www.fossilguy.com/trips/blackwater-diving-cooper-river/cooper-river-diving-trip-2013.htm

The "Megalodon Man" died diving in the Ogeechee River near Savannah;

https://www.theworldslargestsharksjaw.com/
 

GLS

Classic Southern Gentleman
The river currents cut deep into the strata of earth that hold the teeth. Dredging the Savannah River accomplishes the same which explains the broken teeth. Megalodon's descendant modern era shark, the Great White, should be showing up off our coast as they follow the Right Whales southerly to the calving grounds. The local paper reported a pair 20 miles off the coast of Tybee earlier this month. This is also the time of the year that Bluefin Tuna show-up off our coast, another Great White morsel. Gil
 
Thread starter #9

Russdaddy

Senior Member
Thanks Guys, the Meg was a good one for sure, my son pulled that one up on his own. Our favorite is the Hemipristis top row left of middle. Great color and size. Can't wait to get back out there.
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
I saw five Meg teeth, each one would near about cover my hand, that were found in the now closed sand company on the edge of the Kinchafoonee Creek in Lee County. They were pristine too. Not a chip or break in any of them.
 
From what I've read you don't find the big stuff on the beach. We were at Hilton Head and went to the Sand's beach at Port Royal. My daughter has an eye for them.

I was reading about sharks teeth in the areas and read a bit about finding Megalodon and other fossils in the rivers. I'm not sure why there is more in the rivers than in the ocean around these parts.

Girl finds one on the banks of the May River;

https://www.islandpacket.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/untamed-lowcountry/article116657848.html

Couple black water diving in the Cooper River. The current is so strong you have to jab a screwdriver in the bottom to keep from drifting away.

https://www.fossilguy.com/trips/blackwater-diving-cooper-river/cooper-river-diving-trip-2013.htm

The "Megalodon Man" died diving in the Ogeechee River near Savannah;

https://www.theworldslargestsharksjaw.com/
Good read on the Meg man, he was a nut for diving in those currents and for where he would go. Too bad he lost his life.
 
My father said that when he was growing up in Burke County (Waynesboro), he had always heard that locals used to go to Briar Creek and sift for sharks teeth there, and he'd heard lots of stories about people finding them although he never laid eyes on any.

Have any of y'all heard of people looking for and finding them that far north away from the coast?
 

Tadder

Senior Member
Them some nice uns, right there. We use to got too the beach when the kids were little and we'd find em every where back in the day. Kids love it. Went back last year for a day are 2 and only found 2 small ones. beach has changed a lot where we found em years ago. I remember 1 yr we found over a 1000 teeth in 1 wk. and help other folks find em too. If we had counted all those too we found close to 1200 that wk. It is very addictive, can't walk any beach now without taken a look for em.(y)
 
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