Show your homemade feeders

BBBc3

New Member
#4
I know you can't really see it good, but I made this one from things I found around the house. The top of tripod is a golf cart rim, the legs went to an old field gate that a tree fell on, and the winch is off an old boat trailer.
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Son

Senior Member
#6
Show

We tried feeders once. Got tired of feeding coons, so took em out and/or turned em off. Corn got too high for our pockets too. Did find that bucks like sweet feed the best.
 

carabrook

Gone But Not Forgotten
#8
Feeder

I made some feeders specifically for coons but the same design will work for deer with corn.

Materials

- one piece of 4.5 ft long PVC pipe 6 inch diameter
- one pvc cap to fit the pipe
- one steel T rail fence post
- three pieces of 2 x 2 pressure treat 10 inches long

I used decking screws and you attach two of the pieces of pressure treated wood across the bottom of the pipe. Leave a two inch wide space between them in the middle of the pipe.

Pound the T rail into the gound so that there is four feet of it sticking above the ground

Place the pipe over the T rail with the wood spacers down

Fill the pipe with corn

Using the decking screws attach the third piece of wood to the top/outside of the pipe cap (makes it easier to get on and off)

Place the cap on your pipe

Your done. Gravity feeds the corn. I use cheap dog food for my coon feeders and found I had a lot of other critters eating at my expense so I fenced around them and cut small entrances so that dogs and coyotes couldn't get at the food. Still get possums, cats, foxes but they don't eat as much as the other critters. With corn I don't think you will have as much an issue and they should work well for deer. Pictures attached are with and without the fence. The bottom picture shows the two wood pieces and how much they dug it out when I didn't get it filled fast enough for their liking, lol





 
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SarahFair

Senior Member
#9
Is it me or do those shed look real yellow?
What could cause that?
 

bigkga69

Senior Member
#11
heres one I made from a 55 gallon drum, obviously I get two feeders, the top is the plastic roof material from Lowes, the legs are 1 in. by 1 in. square alluminum..maybe 30 dollars invested and took about an hour to build, then paint takes longer....
 

Attachments

#13


This Feeder will hold approx. 150 Pounds of Corn and will last approx. 1.5-2 Months throwing 4-5 Seconds twice a day.

30 Galllon Galvanized Garbage Can $15 Home Depot
Leg Bracket Kit $29.99
Legs from Old Canopy Free
American Hunter Analog Feeder $30 Bass Pro
Moultrie Solar Panel $12 Southern Trophy Hunters Show Lakeland, Florida
Moultrie Rechargeable Battery $7.50
Bungee Cord for Lid $1
 
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#16
I would not recommend a feeder like the one "thebody" posted on here that he made from plans. Look at the doe having to bend her neck just to get to the food. Imagine a buck with a large set of antlers trying to feed from there. A feeder has to allow plenty of room for a big buck to be able to feed. Here is one I made from an old shed I tore down. Lots of hogs in the area, so I had to anchor it down by nailing two four foot pieces of 2x8 on each side and burying them three foot into the groung. Took less than 3 hours.
 

Attachments

Thebody

Senior Member
#17
I would not recommend a feeder like the one "thebody" posted on here that he made from plans. Look at the doe having to bend her neck just to get to the food. Imagine a buck with a large set of antlers trying to feed from there. A feeder has to allow plenty of room for a big buck to be able to feed. Here is one I made from an old shed I tore down. Lots of hogs in the area, so I had to anchor it down by nailing two four foot pieces of 2x8 on each side and burying them three foot into the groung. Took less than 3 hours.
I agree that was a concern, but I wanted something I could put around 500 lbs in and leave it alone. What I ended up doing was cutting a couple of slits in the lip of the trough so feed would fall to the ground.
 
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