Shrimp Seining

Twenty six pounds of tails, 4 pulls, along with the whiting and trout that found their way into our net. Had the North beach to ourselves. Size was good with a good many Jumbo's in the mix.
 

Rhodes

Senior Member
I see that the low tide that night was at 9:08. Did you get them on the outgoing or incoming. Reason I ask is that I will be down in a couple of weeks and the night tide will be about the same.
 
The brown shrimp have shown up and make up the bulk of what is being caught currently. The size is good and will get better as they molt and grow over the next two weeks.
 
We we're going to go try to siene the North end next week but haven't been seining since the hurricanes. Did they mess up the beach as far as eroding the channel out or the beach?
 
Still pretty much the same with the addition of one new tree in the water. You can see that new tree at low tide, to shouldn't be a problem once you know where it is.
 
Mullet have started running the beaches so Dolphins will begin to be a problem for seiners at St. Andrews. Bring people to walk behind the net if you don't want holes in it.
 
Any recent reports to share?

I am coming down middle of next week to pick up and try my new seine out. I am hoping to get into some shrimp, and if not I can settle for some blue crabs!
 
Tide will be right to shrimp St. Andrews, may see you there depending on weather. Blue crabs can be caught seining in numbers higher than traditional crabbing.
Last time we went I bumped into something very large on the deep end of the net, down toward Jekyll point, near the green channel marker; not sure what it was, but it was big. Possibly a tarpon or alligator, wasn't a manatee. Did not get in the net, so can't say. We decided to avoid it and went back to the dock to continue seining. We ended up the night with approximately 50+ pounds of brown shrimp of good size. Nothing like a little excitement to get the blood flowing.
Mullet show up occasionally and that leads to problems with dolphins. Should you see them before you start seining, it would be wise to wait till they move on before starting to avoid holes in your net.
 
Last time we went I bumped into something very large on the deep end of the net, down toward Jekyll point, near the green channel marker; not sure what it was, but it was big. Possibly a tarpon or alligator, wasn't a manatee. Did not get in the net, so can't say.
Could have been one of those sharks. :) Every once in a while I check out the ocearch.org page. it is something to see how close those tiger sharks and great whites come in sometimes to the georgia coast.
 
Tide will be right to shrimp St. Andrews, may see you there depending on weather. Blue crabs can be caught seining in numbers higher than traditional crabbing.
Last time we went I bumped into something very large on the deep end of the net, down toward Jekyll point, near the green channel marker; not sure what it was, but it was big. Possibly a tarpon or alligator, wasn't a manatee. Did not get in the net, so can't say. We decided to avoid it and went back to the dock to continue seining. We ended up the night with approximately 50+ pounds of brown shrimp of good size. Nothing like a little excitement to get the blood flowing.
Mullet show up occasionally and that leads to problems with dolphins. Should you see them before you start seining, it would be wise to wait till they move on before starting to avoid holes in your net.
That is exactly what I don't want to feel out there! I'm gonna be a bit nervous until I get comfortable. Good to hear the shrimp and crab are there though.

Is driftwood beach a good spot once the tide moves out a bit past the trees?
 
The problem with the main beaches is the waves. Shrimp can be caught on the main beaches; however, it requires a west wind in order to do so to eliminate the waves.
My wife and I have been seining for many, many years and this was the first time I have ever had anything like this happen; however, I know people who have had their nets damaged by manatee, alligators, needle nose gar, dolphins, medium size sharks, and I have personally caught tarpon in our seine. None of these people were injured, their nets did not fair so well in some instances. These events are extremely rare.
Jekyll Island is a wildlife sanctuary, you are not allowed to harm any of the wildlife on it whether it be a rattlesnake, alligator, or whatever; and I have personally seen both on the beaches. Just be aware of your surroundings at all times and avoid any confrontations when possible.
 
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