Spec Knives

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Anvil Head

Senior Member
Buddy gave me two new front strut springs he had ordered for his HarleyD that wouldn't fit. Turned out to be great steel just a little small in the diameter department. Couldn't let it go to waste so I forged a few smaller blacksmith knives from some of it. Decided to dub them "Specs" after the small native brookies I used to catch in NGA.
That's part of the spring they are resting on.
I still have one or two left - $50 + s&h.
 

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Anvil Head

Senior Member
They are pretty much "fun work" for me. I add them into the forging mix when I'm doing larger blades just to keep everything moving and hot. Not one to stand around if I have a good heat going.
Been asked by several - blade lengths vary from 1.5" to a little over 2" and OAL are roughly around 4.5"-5".
I do make larger ones (and smaller ones) price based on size.
 
Good job.
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Mighty nice. Old time buckskinner and blacksmith Edgar Chattin make a similar small knife out of old files.
 
Thread starter #7

Anvil Head

Senior Member
Not surprising Nic.
When it comes to knives, there is very little that is "new" unless you add battery power. Second oldest tool used by man. I'm sure the "Blacksmith" knife has been around from pretty much the beginning of the discovery of metal. They were even heattreating wood, bone and stone with fire before that.
Always like to see these "New Design" knife makers get all excited about something they thought up. All one has to do is a little research and see that someone back in the BC's or earlier made one just like it and it was probably better made - without all the fancy new equipment a knifemaker must have to be considered a "real knifemaker". Always good for a laugh.
 
Thread starter #9

Anvil Head

Senior Member
Haven't forgotten any request, just the busiest time of the year for me. I'm like Wafflehouse hashbrowns this time of the year....you know the whole list.
Thank you for your patience.
 

T-N-T

Senior Member
Got mine today!
Thanks Mr Carl! Awesome little knife. This thing will be awesome for fish and skwerls alike.
 
Thread starter #12
Hope you gentlemen enjoy the knives. They are a fun side product during my regular forging sessions. Did the first one for my preacher friend up in Blairsville cause he likes hunting the little Specs.

Looks like I'm going to have to make some more now. Several of us GA makers are going to host a "One Day Knife Show" over at Jaemore's near Cornelia/Alto on Nov. 11th. and I've gotten several request to have some there. I'll be doing a forging demo out front in the parking lot during the show if you want to come watch me make one.

Will be posting more on the event/show later this month.
 

T-N-T

Senior Member
This knife has been used for a few things so far. But I have not snapped any pics....

I highly recommend a small knife for certain jobs!

Thanks again!


IMG_20171225_092013.jpg
 
Thread starter #15
Beautiful! Woodies are my all time favorite. It's always satisfying to know one of my blades has an occupation as well. Thanks for sharing TNT. Hope you had a blessed Christmas.
 
Don't know how I missed this the first time round but very nice. Let me know if you make a few more.
 
Thread starter #17
Still have plenty of material, just had to take a sabatical from the forge to get next year's firewood cut/split/stacked and clean up from the beautiful snow we had (storm had it's side benefits). Besides I needed a break, this year's work went well into December. Not complaining but usually have Nov - Jan to do other important things.
I'll be knocking out a few more 1st of the year for sure.
 
Not surprising Nic.
When it comes to knives, there is very little that is "new" unless you add battery power. Second oldest tool used by man. I'm sure the "Blacksmith" knife has been around from pretty much the beginning of the discovery of metal. They were even heattreating wood, bone and stone with fire before that.
Always like to see these "New Design" knife makers get all excited about something they thought up. All one has to do is a little research and see that someone back in the BC's or earlier made one just like it and it was probably better made - without all the fancy new equipment a knifemaker must have to be considered a "real knifemaker". Always good for a laugh.
This triggered a question I've had for a long time and I can't think of anyone better to ask. Regarding Damascus I have read many times that the original process whereby it was made was lost.......yet we have Damascus steel today. Can you elaborate on this? If the original process was lost when was it re-invented and how do we know it's not just the same process as the original?
 

Miguel Cervantes

GON Severe Weatherman
This triggered a question I've had for a long time and I can't think of anyone better to ask. Regarding Damascus I have read many times that the original process whereby it was made was lost.......yet we have Damascus steel today. Can you elaborate on this? If the original process was lost when was it re-invented and how do we know it's not just the same process as the original?
You guys might find this article on that topic interesting.
Incidentally, I own a WWI Japanese Officers sword made by one of the last surviving swordsmiths of the old way. I had the inscription verified and it translated authentically to a rough english "fire and stone". I had to find a very old japanese woman to translate because the modern japanese writing is different and those my age and younger could not read it. Worth researching due to those blades being lauded as the highest quality steel ever produced, and I can attest to that. I've never laid an edge alteration to it and it will cut you if you look at it hard enough. It will put a razor blade to shame.

http://www.nytimes.com/1981/09/29/science/the-mystery-of-damascus-steel-appears-solved.html
 
Thread starter #20
Trust me, I'm no expert or authority, but have been involved in a lot of conversations with very knowlegable metalurgist and have read whatever I can find on the subject.
Interesting article. Not so sure I agree with all the "artistic license" with science. Pretty sure you cannot induce extra nitrogen into steel with a urine quench. Chemistry and physics as we understand it indicates that is not possible no matter the origin of the quenchant. Not sure the writer of the article is supporting or challenging that but does just leave it there.
Wootz steel (crucible steel) has been around, made and used a good bit longer than the referenced doctor. It has found a resurgence into the cutlery industry, but never was "lost".
Through my own research over the years, (for self conclusion only) that Damascus Steel and pattern welded steel were two entirely different types of steel. How the terms got co-mingled to mean the same thing may be the results of what the Japanese masters did by forge welding mild steel or iron around a core of crucible hi-carb steel. Making hi-carb steel back then was quite a major undertaking and the resulting steel very precious, so the Masters would of course be very frugal with it's application. Many of the found ancient Jap swords in various stages of oxidation indicated that time wise the multi layered folded blades came later as a natural search to produce the best blade. The earlier ones were seldom more than 3 layers.
It's quite interesting to see different explanations of the way things developed.

The one thing I have learned over the years is that in general, the "Public" is pretty adamant that pattern welded steel blades are "Damascus". I haven't found chasing that rabbit is worth the time and effort where business is concerned, just makes for good campfire talk.

Thanks for sharing the article Miguel, maybe it will enlighten a few.
 
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