T.P.'s 5th Annual Food Plot Prep Picture Thread

Thread starter #21

Canuck5

Senior Member
We have some springs that just "leak" out of the ground and go down this hill. We have thought about digging a hole just below where it leaks out of the hillside and putting a kiddie pool in it to let the water flow into that and fill it, when it fills the kiddie pool it would just overflow back down the hill. Do you think the deer would go to this buried pool to drink?
I believe that they would. Once they find it and assuming there is cover close by, it will get used. I'd also put a mineral site, 10 feet away from it.

The other thing with your small plastic pool, would be to put a weighted stick (on one end) that has one end sticking out of the pool and sitting on the soil near by. The reason for that, is if any small critters get in there, they have a way to climb out. Don't want to have any small dead critters spoiling your pool.
 
We have some springs that just "leak" out of the ground and go down this hill. We have thought about digging a hole just below where it leaks out of the hillside and putting a kiddie pool in it to let the water flow into that and fill it, when it fills the kiddie pool it would just overflow back down the hill. Do you think the deer would go to this buried pool to drink?
It certainly wouldn't hurt, but as to whether they stop or not is much dependent upon other water sources nearby. I have found that if there is an abundance of water nearby, your small pool won't entice much; however, if they are having to travel a good distance for water, then your pool is all the more attractive.

Other issues to keep in mind relating to the local water source vs. your pool is comfort level and accessibility for the deer. If they feel safe with their natural water source, they're going to kill that while they perceive your water source may put them more at harm... JM2C
I did this exact same thing last year and get some use but not as much as I had hoped. Seems like I get the same 4 or 5 doe families using it but when I set a cam on video I get a lot of deer that walk by and sniff it but don’t drink from it.
Same thing, Green Thumb...we'd like to think "If you build it, they will come", but there are the other factors to weigh in.
 
It certainly wouldn't hurt, but as to whether they stop or not is much dependent upon other water sources nearby. I have found that if there is an abundance of water nearby, your small pool won't entice much; however, if they are having to travel a good distance for water, then your pool is all the more attractive.

Other issues to keep in mind relating to the local water source vs. your pool is comfort level and accessibility for the deer. If they feel safe with their natural water source, they're going to kill that while they perceive your water source may put them more at harm... JM2C

Same thing, Green Thumb...we'd like to think "If you build it, they will come", but there are the other factors to weigh in.
I agree with everything you said. I have a mineral lick about 30 yards away on this same trail that gets hit pretty hard. The deer pass this hole, give it a look and sniff but the usage isn’t what I was hoping for. Probably 10-15% of passer-bys and looks to be the same deer every time. Maybe the fact that is has been so wet this year has something to do with it as well. Also agree on putting something in the water in case a small animal falls in to escape.

Here is a picture of my water hole when I put it in. My main concern was if it would crack when ice built up across it in winter. So far it has held up well and stays full.
767551D8-AE5D-485E-AA94-6F46861F4C5C.png
 
Very nice...did you use a kiddy pool? If so, are you having to fill it regularly, or does mother nature keep it full?
Yes it is a kiddie pool. It is at the bottom of a hill in the basin of a drainage that comes off the hill. There is a spring that runs intermittently, as well as a lot of runoff that flows down the drainage during rain events. I have never had to fill it and I’ve never seen it more than 1” low between rains.
 
For questions on Army Worms, please see our resident expert, Elfiii
I'm late to this party but yes, ask me any question you want to about Army Worms. I'm a world renowned expert on them. It does not matter which question about Army Worms you ask for you will get the same answer as the answer applies to every question about Army Worms. That's why it's easy to become an expert on them. You only have to learn one thing about them.
 

Crakajak

Senior Member
I'm late to this party but yes, ask me any question you want to about Army Worms. I'm a world renowned expert on them. It does not matter which question about Army Worms you ask for you will get the same answer as the answer applies to every question about Army Worms. That's why it's easy to become an expert on them. You only have to learn one thing about them.
Bait????
 
Nope. I can't give the answer on the open forum. I would have to ban myself if I did and that wouldn't be prudent at this juncture. bounce.gif
 
Thread starter #31

Canuck5

Senior Member
It's been more than a month since I've been down to camp. We've had lots of rain down there this summer and of course with rain .... comes weeds and grasses. Some plots worse than others, but the deer are still feeding in the clover! Ran the weed wiper over them again, in hopes of cleaning things up. I will be leaving some sections of my plots, to keep food on the table, in case of a drought.
 

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Thread starter #32

Canuck5

Senior Member
2018 Manchester Farm and Garden Clover Seed Prices. If you order on Thursday they should have it on Monday.

2018 Manchester Farm & Garden Clover prices.JPG
 
Thread starter #34

Canuck5

Senior Member
LOL, This year, in my "annual" mix, I am going with Frosty Berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum annual, to replace crimson), Advantage Ladino (perennial) and Medium Red (biennial). I probably have enough reseeding crimson clover in the ground, that I will see lots of that come back, as well. Just stealing some info from Whitetail Institute, to help make my annual plots more attractive and allows me to convert them over to "perennial" plots, in a "plot rotation", I'm trying to get to.

It will be oats this year, along with radishes, PT Turnips and Dwarf Essex Rape ... just a little of those.

The deer are enjoying the Advantage Ladino clover I planted last year, so, it's a keeper.

https://www.qdma.com/frosty-berseem-clover-deer/

https://www.qdma.com/food-plot-species-profile-berseem-clover/

Imperial Whitetail Institute.JPG Imperial Whitetail Institute1.JPG
 
Thread starter #35

Canuck5

Senior Member
Well, getting closer to that time, now!!! FarmLogs tells me that my rainfall is 1.8% wetter than normal and 32.2% cooler than normal. Not sure what that means for going forward this fall, but we'll see!

Seeds prices are slightly up from last year. Fertilizer is about the same. My plan is to spread my fertilizer, maybe the end of next week and get it worked into the ground, on my annual plots. By doing that it sure helps out when I go back down to plant in the end of September or early October.

I'll be leaving some strips of the Advantage Ladino and Medium red clover that I planted last fall and turning those into more perennial plots. Just hedging my bets in case we get another dry fall.
 
Thread starter #36

Canuck5

Senior Member
Oats, Frosty Berseem, Advantage Ladino, Medium red clovers, daikon radishes, purple top turnips and leftover soybeans will be my annual mix this fall.
 
Thread starter #37

Canuck5

Senior Member
Looks like a bumper crop, up here in Marietta ..... Not sure what things are like down at the camp, but we'll see in a week! What does the acorn crop look like in your neck of the woods?



Acorns.JPG
 
I/C peas planted 2 weeks ago. This plot is shaped like a "T". Its 100 yards up the hill from this pic and 30-40 yards left and right of this view. Crab apples and saw tooth oaks are on top of the hill at the top of the plot. img20180824_124144.jpg
 
Thread starter #40

Canuck5

Senior Member
Well, looking at my 10 day rain forecast, there doesn't appear to be much rainfall predicated! Be careful trying to plant early.
 
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