The end of my days fishing.

Thread starter #21
Not so with the eastern diamondback. Between indiscriminate killing and habitat loss, their population is way down. There`s talk of them going on the Endangered List.

As for those exotic snakes, they could be trouble for a lot of things.
Nic. I think you missed my point. But I agree with you 100%. Once these invasive creatures establish, killing every one you see is NOT gonna be a solution. The Eastern Diamond back SHOULD be on the Endangered List. But when you are talking about and INVASIVE species it's a whole different ballgame, especially where these things are concerned. They all may be snakes, but as far as the food chain is concerned these invasive beast are waaaaay up on the food chain over the Eastern Diamondback. Heck, they eat everything, including you. There's no natural predators after they reach a certain size. That's something the average snake can't say. Everything preys on them all the way through adulthood. And someone already mentioned it gets too cold up here and that they would have to evolve to survive up here. That's not true to the best of my understanding. From what I understand about their adaptation in Florida, they haven't evolved to survive in that environment, they only have to ADAPT. That's a big difference. You can take a snake and put him in a tank, cold at one end and hot at the other and he will ADAPT in just a few minutes. All he has to do is find a place to get comfortable until the cold stress is gone. There's a lot of places like that in these woods, stump holes, sewers, etc. There's some data to suggest that these snakes are already moving up through Florida.

Some of this won't be new to you, but what they found in the study in South Carolina is scary to me as a ole boy who loves to traipse around the swamps of middle and south Georgia.

https://www.seminolenewspaper.com/invasive-burmese-pythons-migrate-north/
 
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Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
Nic. I think you missed my point. But I agree with you 100%. Once these invasive creatures establish, killing every one you see is NOT gonna be a solution. The Eastern Diamond back SHOULD be on the Endangered List. But when you are talking about and INVASIVE species it's a whole different ballgame, especially where these things are concerned. They all may be snakes, but as far as the food chain is concerned these invasive beast are waaaaay up on the food chain over the Eastern Diamondback. Heck, they eat everything, including you. There's no natural predators after they reach a certain size. That's something the average snake can't say. Everything preys on them all the way through adulthood. And someone already mentioned it gets too cold up here and that they would have to evolve to survive up here. That's not true to the best of my understanding. From what I understand about their adaptation in Florida, they haven't evolved to survive in that environment, they only have to ADAPT. That's a big difference. You can take a snake and put him in a tank, cold at one end and hot at the other and he will ADAPT in just a few minutes. All he has to do is find a place to get comfortable until the cold stress is gone. There's a lot of places like that in these woods, stump holes, sewers, etc. There's some data to suggest that these snakes are already moving up through Florida.

I`m very concerned about them. Not for my personal safety, but for the damage they will do to our ecosystem. I`ll kill every one I come across. No doubt that.
 
Thread starter #23
I`m very concerned about them. Not for my personal safety, but for the damage they will do to our ecosystem. I`ll kill every one I come across. No doubt that.
Sorry. I didn't post the link above. Had to edit it. DUHHHHH.
 
I stopped a club member a few feet from him. Putting up deer stands(looking up). Could you see him going to you blind/stand in the dark.
That's a small native snake, not a 17ft exotic snake that white and yellow and probably about 6-8" in diameter.
 
Not so with the eastern diamondback. Between indiscriminate killing and habitat loss, their population is way down. There`s talk of them going on the Endangered List.
As for those exotic snakes, they could be trouble for a lot of things.
Blast 'em anyway.
There are PLENTY of non-venomous snakes around to do nature's chores in the environment without those venomous ones.
 

Chap

Senior Member
Our ecosystem is to cold, those cold winter blasts we get would kill them without question. These things are surviving in the only area they possibly can in the US. Are they invasive and need to be taken care of? YES! but you have no fear of them living here unless they do some type of rapid evolution that allows it.
There have been some recent studies that have disproven this and indicate that the pythons that have established themselves in the states could live year-round as far north as Charleston, SC. It may not be entirely accurate, but to best relate it here, their range could overlap that of the American Alligator.
 
Not so with the eastern diamondback. Between indiscriminate killing and habitat loss, their population is way down. There`s talk of them going on the Endangered List.

As for those exotic snakes, they could be trouble for a lot of things.
Diamondbacks are already on the NC endangered list.
 

PopPop

Senior Member
The older I get, the more I recognize that there are much fewer things that actually need to be killed.
 
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