The Union of the Two Natures of Jesus Christ

Thread starter #1
The divinity and humanity of Jesus Christ prove that He was a Divine-human Being. The orthodox theory holds that the two natures of Christ were both complete in themselves yet so organically and indissolubly united that no third nature is formed thereby. It forbids us to divide the person and confound the two natures of Jesus Christ. Being truly divine He is a true representative of God, and being truly human He is a true representative of man.
Christ constantly spoke of Himself as a single person and not as two persons in one. There is no interchange of speech between the two natures as between two persons. The attributes and powers of both natures are ascribed to the one person so that they are operated as part of a single individual. There is no double personality, but one single unit of characteristics of both the human and divine. Just as any father and mother impart certain traits to the offspring, making a single person with characteristics of both parents, so the human and the divine were united in the one person of Jesus Christ-with one body, soul, and spirit and with one consciousness and one will.
The fatherhood of God and the motherhood of Mary produced a single personality. After all, it must be remembered that God made man with the same bodily parts as He has in His Spirit body, only our bodies are earthly and human and His is spiritual and divine. He made man with the same kind of soul with feelings, emotions, passions, desires, and appetites, capable of the same soul-acts as He Himself was, only our soul is finite and His is infinite. He made man with a spirit with all the attributes and powers that He has, capable of the same acts; only our spirits are finite and His is infinite. In other words, man is endowed with exactly the same traits, characteristics, attributes, powers, feelings, and passions as God, only on a finite scale.
With this in mind one can see that the soul and spirit faculties that were born in Jesus Christ by a divine Father and a human mother were exactly the same as in any other being like God; so when Christ acted and used any one attribute or power as a man it was like the exercise of God in the same aspects, only His faculties were perfectly untainted with the fall and its affects. When Christ acted He was like man before the fall and not like sinful man since the fall. Every fallen man when he is re-created in Christ and made a new creature is capable of proper exercise of his faculties in holy and lawful uses.
Man in his unfallen state acted exactly like God in the exercise of his faculties, only his attributes and powers were limited. He was capable of the same powers and acts only on a finite scale. What is finite in man is infinite in God. Holy man when he is energized and acted upon and endued with supernatural powers can exercise his natural attributes and faculties in a supernatural degree or measure, depending upon what extent he is yielded to and energized by the Spirit of God. For example, Christ and the disciples when endued with power from on high were capable of God-action to destroy sin and sickness as much as if God Himself were doing the work without using them as instruments.
 

Israel

Senior Member
Does Adam want a do-over? If so, why? In other words, upon what basis do you see him coming?
Is he acceptable on that basis?
And if "do-over" is granted, upon what basis is it granted?
 
Does Adam want a do-over? If so, why? In other words, upon what basis do you see him coming?
Is he acceptable on that basis?
And if "do-over" is granted, upon what basis is it granted?
A once for all crucifixion ...

His,

and mine


:bounce:
 
Thread starter #5
Final Failure of Adam

Does Adam want a do-over? If so, why? In other words, upon what basis do you see him coming?
Is he acceptable on that basis?
And if "do-over" is granted, upon what basis is it granted?
(Gen.6:3)
And the Lord said, My spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be an hundred and twenty years.
( And the Lord said,) here we have the 5th prophecy in Gen. (6:3) It was fulfilled in Adam, and gave him 120 more years to live before being cut off. This was given when he was 810 years old, making v 1-2 refer to the 810 years since Adam's creation and v 4 refer to the days after this to the flood.
(My spirit shall not always) here Heb. ruwach. wind, breath, life. Here it is the breath of life, or lives--conscience, life (45:27; Josh. 5:1; Judg. 15:19; Job 27:3; 32:8).
(strive with man,) here Heb. duwn. to rule judge. trans. strive only here. elsewhere, judge, judged, judgeth, judgment, content, execute, and plead. Many versions translate it remain in, My breath of life will not always remain in the Adam.
(man) here Heb. Adam. with the definite article, the man Adam. the meaning is " for that he (Adam) is also flesh (as all other men are) yet his (Adam's) days shall be a hundred and twenty years" (v 3). If man is held to be in the plural, meaning all men in general and not Adam in particular, then who else is referred to by the word also? The fact is the verse reveals that Adam had corrupted his way upon earth as all other flesh had done, and that God, in His mercy, gave him 120 more years in which to repent and to conform his life to the will of the creator. Whether Adam did this or not is not know.
(for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be an hundred and twenty years).
 
Thread starter #6
The divinity and humanity of Jesus Christ prove that He was a Divine-human Being. The orthodox theory holds that the two natures of Christ were both complete in themselves yet so organically and indissolubly united that no third nature is formed thereby. It forbids us to divide the person and confound the two natures of Jesus Christ. Being truly divine He is a true representative of God, and being truly human He is a true representative of man.
Christ constantly spoke of Himself as a single person and not as two persons in one. There is no interchange of speech between the two natures as between two persons. The attributes and powers of both natures are ascribed to the one person so that they are operated as part of a single individual. There is no double personality, but one single unit of characteristics of both the human and divine. Just as any father and mother impart certain traits to the offspring, making a single person with characteristics of both parents, so the human and the divine were united in the one person of Jesus Christ-with one body, soul, and spirit and with one consciousness and one will.
The fatherhood of God and the motherhood of Mary produced a single personality. After all, it must be remembered that God made man with the same bodily parts as He has in His Spirit body, only our bodies are earthly and human and His is spiritual and divine. He made man with the same kind of soul with feelings, emotions, passions, desires, and appetites, capable of the same soul-acts as He Himself was, only our soul is finite and His is infinite. He made man with a spirit with all the attributes and powers that He has, capable of the same acts; only our spirits are finite and His is infinite. In other words, man is endowed with exactly the same traits, characteristics, attributes, powers, feelings, and passions as God, only on a finite scale.
With this in mind one can see that the soul and spirit faculties that were born in Jesus Christ by a divine Father and a human mother were exactly the same as in any other being like God; so when Christ acted and used any one attribute or power as a man it was like the exercise of God in the same aspects, only His faculties were perfectly untainted with the fall and its affects. When Christ acted He was like man before the fall and not like sinful man since the fall. Every fallen man when he is re-created in Christ and made a new creature is capable of proper exercise of his faculties in holy and lawful uses.
Man in his unfallen state acted exactly like God in the exercise of his faculties, only his attributes and powers were limited. He was capable of the same powers and acts only on a finite scale. What is finite in man is infinite in God. Holy man when he is energized and acted upon and endued with supernatural powers can exercise his natural attributes and faculties in a supernatural degree or measure, depending upon what extent he is yielded to and energized by the Spirit of God. For example, Christ and the disciples when endued with power from on high were capable of God-action to destroy sin and sickness as much as if God Himself were doing the work without using them as instruments.
It must be also remembered that men when born again became partakers of the dive nature and to the extent to which that nature controls and works in and through their faculties they live divine lives and do divine works. In such men the created faculties are liberated from evil acts and evil powers and become acts of divine energy through the Holy Spirit. Just as Christ was perfectly helpless in Himself and acted , spoke, worked, lived, and did all things through the anointing of the Holy Spirit, the believer to extent that he becomes like Christ becomes God-inspired and God-energized and God-operated. Thus the Christian fully living in the fullness of God lives a divine-human life in the Holy Spirit by the very presence and power of God in the human soul and spirit.
 

hobbs27

Senior Member
Adam was cutoff not when he physically died, but when he lost Sonship..and was cast out of the Garden to become a servant.

There was a death in the day he ate... Just as God promised.
 
Thread starter #8
Adam was cutoff not when he physically died, but when he lost Sonship..and was cast out of the Garden to become a servant.

There was a death in the day he ate... Just as God promised.
Became a servant to Satan

So it was a Spiritual death and he would have to be saved again.
 

hobbs27

Senior Member
Became a servant to Satan

So it was a Spiritual death and he would have to be saved again.
No.. Adam became a servant of God, but lost Sonship. It took God's only "begotten" Son to bring Adams lineage back into Sonship, that through the last Adam, Jesus He was the heir and they were Co heirs of the inheritance. A servant doesn't receive an inheritance.
 
quote:
"Thus the Christian fully living in the fullness of God lives a divine-human life in the Holy Spirit by the very presence and power of God in the human soul and spirit."

What prevents the average Christian from feeling like he doesn't have the "Holy Spirit indwelling" when he fails to become righteous by lack of fruit?

Perhaps the alcoholic Christian who continues to drink? The Christian who still has lust in his heart? The overeating Christian? The angry Christian? The non-forgiving Christian?

Many people must feel like total failures as they continue with their daily struggles.

It's enough to make one see or think that he wasn't "elected."
 
Within the bounds of Christianity is the concept that one can't overcome without God.

Naturally the alcoholic that doesn't overcome must feel like God hasn't given him his Spirit to overcome. That perhaps one must be of the Elect in order to overcome.

If it's "all from God" and we must "surrender all" then I can see why one would feel this way if they don't overcome.
 
quote:
"Thus the Christian fully living in the fullness of God lives a divine-human life in the Holy Spirit by the very presence and power of God in the human soul and spirit."

1 John 3:2
Dear friends, now we are children of God, and what we will be has not yet been made known. But we know that when Christ appears, we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.

Maybe we must wait for this Theosis or deification.
 
Thread starter #13
No.. Adam became a servant of God, but lost Sonship. It took God's only "begotten" Son to bring Adams lineage back into Sonship, that through the last Adam, Jesus He was the heir and they were Co heirs of the inheritance. A servant doesn't receive an inheritance.
Adam became a sinner, St. John 8:34 Jesus answered them, Verily, Verily, I say unto you Whosoever committeth sin is the servant of sin.
Matt. 6:24 No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon. Adam lived 930 years and no where in the Bible does it speak of him repenting of his sins. A sinner is not a servant.
 
Thread starter #15
If we can understand these things, we certainly can understand how God could become so perfectly human and yet remain so perfectly divine as to be a perfect union--God and man in one personality. Whether the divine attributes and powers of God in Christ were limited and to what extent is a great question in Christian circles. Whether He laid them aside entirely for a time, or whether they were possessed by Him and voluntarily limited will always be a point of controversy. However, this much is settled that He was limited in the days of His flesh. Whether He was limited constitutionally or voluntarily is not the point. It is a fact that if it were done constitutionally it was nevertheless voluntary as stated in John 10:18; Heb. 10:5-9. He was not forced to do one thing. Everything was a voluntary action on His part. It matters not whether it was constitutional, or whether He still retained all the divine powers and attributes in His person and chose to limit their use for His time of life on Earth: the fact remains that He was limited as a man, and if His choice was so powerful as to do away with all use of them, what is the difference between laying them aside and still retaining them without power to use them?
 
The man Jesus never talks to the God Jesus. I would think so since he is only one person. He only has one spirit. He does have his Father's Spirit dwelling in him and he does talk to his Father.
All of that I can see. What I'm trying to picture is the pre-existing Son incarnate as a man bringing that spirit into his one spirit persona. That spirit was not human. Yet somehow he ended up with only one spirit. His spirit plus the indwelling of God's spirit.

Maybe if I believed in the pre-existence of human spirits. That wouldn't matter because Jesus' pre-existing spirit wasn't human. He didn't get a human spirit until he became a human.

Maybe being the Son of God allowed him to bring his pre-existing spirit into the incarnation and use it as his human spirit. He had to bring something with him or it wouldn't be an incarnation.
So it's probably what incarnate as man. The pre-existing spirit of Jesus. That spirit became his human spirit.
 
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Israel

Senior Member
If we can understand these things, we certainly can understand how God could become so perfectly human and yet remain so perfectly divine as to be a perfect union--God and man in one personality. Whether the divine attributes and powers of God in Christ were limited and to what extent is a great question in Christian circles. Whether He laid them aside entirely for a time, or whether they were possessed by Him and voluntarily limited will always be a point of controversy. However, this much is settled that He was limited in the days of His flesh. Whether He was limited constitutionally or voluntarily is not the point. It is a fact that if it were done constitutionally it was nevertheless voluntary as stated in John 10:18; Heb. 10:5-9. He was not forced to do one thing. Everything was a voluntary action on His part. It matters not whether it was constitutional, or whether He still retained all the divine powers and attributes in His person and chose to limit their use for His time of life on Earth: the fact remains that He was limited as a man, and if His choice was so powerful as to do away with all use of them, what is the difference between laying them aside and still retaining them without power to use them?
I cannot but be reminded through what God has given to man as example...but also for no less of joy, in marriage. A man enters into a very "strict" (if that word does not necessarily connote severeness to a misery) limiting of himself implicit in his taking of one woman. Men may learn much. So much indeed...that even the awareness of strictness turn to joy?
 
Is it possible to be "in Christ", but not be in the kingdom?
An intriguing question, but I'm not sure why.

My provisional answer is "no"; but that is because I can't think of a reasonable definition, or combination of definitions, of "in Christ", "kingdom", and "in the kingdom" that would yield a response of "yes".
 
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