This is the beginning: Shortened Season

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Gut_Pile

Senior Member
If the state sees an improvement of the population on Cedar Creek after this change, you will see more of this across the state. If not the whole state
 

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XIronheadX

Senior Member
Increase the difficulty. The first 2 weekends in Ga are usually a windy wash out anyway. Put the odds back in the turkeys favor. That's how they can start to recover. Otherwise improve the habitat. Limit the flow of traffic on public places. I'd imagine turkey hunting there is like fishing under a bridge on I-85, no peace to be had.
 
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Buckman18

Senior Member
My thoughts:
1) comparing the entire state to one piece of heavily hunted public tract is not a valid comparison. One heavily hunted public tract is NOT a random sample and does not represent what’s going on in the rest of the state.

2) there is less turkey hunting pressure today than there was 20 years ago, yet the season dates are the same. Hunting pressure is a non issue. Many properties that get dee hunted don’t ever see a turkey hunter.

3) reducing hunter opportunity will have a net 0% impact on the turkey population. Controlling coyotes, bobcats, raccoons on the properties you hunt is a great idea.
 

XIronheadX

Senior Member
Hunting pressure becomes an issue if there are bad hatches and unsuitable habitat changes. I can't stop the weather or the 2 to 10 yr old pine jungles. It's the recovery time to rebound. 2 good hatches can fix it. Hens take a beating protecting nests just as toms being hunted. 10 toms and 25 hens repopulate faster than 2 toms and 10 hens.

I got problems but a turkey ain't one. I got numerous toms and jakes for next season. But, I've seen 0 poults. What if there's another bad hatch in the area next year? Uh oh. I better do what I can since there are things I can do to sustain my population on private land. That public hunter won't do anything but go hunting.
 
If someone could show you science based proof that it would increase production would you go along with it? Just a hypothetical question I have none.
 

Covehnter

Senior Member
If someone could show you science based proof that it would increase production would you go along with it? Just a hypothetical question I have none.
Nope. Not until they show me scientific proof that other options besides reducing opportunity are not effective.

I just don't understand why limiting hunting days is the only option being considered.
 

Buckman18

Senior Member
for the hundreds of thousands of acres of public land where trapping is not allowed, what is the solution?
Walker, Blue Tick, Elk Hound, or Black & Tan.

On a side note: 95% of my turkey hunting is on Chattahoochee National Forest. 2 of my 3 gobblers last year came from there. Try harder.
 
That's a problem? Our season here runs April 13-May 11 next year, it's always been like that-about a month. With a two-bird limit. I don't know if it makes a difference, but we are sure slap-dab infested with turkeys.
 
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Gut_Pile

Senior Member
I wasn't "trying" anything. I was just asking.

You gave a solution for raccoons. What about coyotes and bobcats?
 

Buckman18

Senior Member
That's a problem? Our season here runs April 13-May 11 next year, it's always been like that-about a month. With a two-bird limit. I don't know if it makes a difference, but we are sure slap-dab infested with turkeys.
I would argue there is no problem. I don’t ‘get’ the notion of reducing the length of turkey season when there is less hunting pressure than 20 years ago as a state. This youngest generation of deer and turkey hunters simply don’t know what it’s like to have to hunt slim pickings. Today’s pickings are rather plentiful compared to when I was a wee-hillbilly, and certainly my father before me.
 

antharper

Senior Member
I think they should shorten it even more for all public land , and I hunt public land a lot during the season !
 

Buckman18

Senior Member
I thought the poult crop would be bad up here this year, the mountains have had a TON of rain this year. But, surprisingly, I’ve seen more poults this year than I did last year.
I'd like to see some about now. At least they would be mature enough to have a fighting chance. 10 to 40 percent make it past the nest, then 25 percent of that make it 4 weeks. Terrible odds.
 
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