U of Alabama Asst. Dean 'resigns' after anti-American tweets discovered

Patriot44

Senior Member
Nothing wrong with other giftings and callings in life, I'm just not sure we wanted to pay the cost of a top Ga school for ours to major in art or music or business. Our could easily live at home and attend a more affordable college to major in those things. An important principle when making college choices is that "idle hands are the devil's workshop." We knew for ours that if their college coursework was not sufficiently challenging, they were a lot more likely to get into trouble. Lots of easier majors leave many college students with too much time on their hands. They develop bad habits that serve them poorly later in life, and they graduate with degrees that are not really tickets to the careers for which they are hoping.
Agree, and I have told both of the kids at least once per week for their entire lives that "you will get a degree that is going to pay, and it should be STEM if you can". And then my wife goes and has her fall in love with Law like her. At least those two can talk to each other and not me. :bounce:
 
I noticed that the New York Times has published an "op/ed" condemning the use of prior social media posts to "condemn" New York Times reporters with their own words. The Times insists that their own use of this means to destroy careers is valid and proper journalism. But according to the NYT Publisher doing the very same thing to his reporters is an attack upon the first amendment.

Don't you love it when the left goes ballistic over someone using their own tactics against them.
 
Thread starter #43

dwhee87

Senior Member
Agree, and I have told both of the kids at least once per week for their entire lives that "you will get a degree that is going to pay, and it should be STEM if you can". And then my wife goes and has her fall in love with Law like her. At least those two can talk to each other and not me. :bounce:
I'd lump Law into the "degree that's gonna pay" list, even though it's not STEM. My youngest will be right there with you daughter and wife. She's a 2L at LSU right now, and just made the traveling Mock trial team, after beating a 3L (senior) team yesterday.
 
Law is on the short list for my next degree. I have to get the wife through two more years of PhD work and settled somewhere first.

Of course, we had to do things the hard way - we worked first and went to school later :LOL:.
 

Patriot44

Senior Member
Law is on the short list for my next degree. I have to get the wife through two more years of PhD work and settled somewhere first.

Of course, we had to do things the hard way - we worked first and went to school later :LOL:.
Me too! 1 semester of college before the Army. Finished my degree while working 60hrs a week. The witch went into the reserves and was told by her drill that she better be enrolled in college before she came back for phase2. She went to bootcamp between 11th and 12th grade. She then triple majored and Ive got the checks to show for them. :bounce:
 
Me too! 1 semester of college before the Army. Finished my degree while working 60hrs a week. The witch went into the reserves and was told by her drill that she better be enrolled in college before she came back for phase2. She went to bootcamp between 11th and 12th grade. She then triple majored and Ive got the checks to show for them. :bounce:
Dangit. We retired in 08 and started school in early 09. It has been a very interesting ride. I had Navy, fast food, land surveying helper, civil engineering helper, masonry, heavy equipment owner operator and wildlife management experience by then. Now that I think about it, it was pretty interesting before we took 6 months off and called it retirement.

We tried doing nothing, hunting, fishing, traveling and shopping full-time but it did not work out for us. We had to be doing something. I think volunteering at the rescue shelter and fostering puppies was about as fun as anything I've ever done.

Now I have a degree in computer science, one in underwater archaeology and another in geospatial sciences.
 
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Yes it is. If the employer is a government institution, employees retain full 1st Amendment rights for actions taken outside their official duties.
The fact that it is a government institution does not change a thing. Why don't you ask a couple of celebrity former FBI agents who found this out.

10-15% seems about right nationally. West Point, USAFA, and Hillsdale were higher. UGA seems to be about that. Harvard and MIT were lower when we were there.
From discussions with administrators and faculty, UGA is closer to 40%, maybe 50, but the conservatives don't tend to do stupid things to get their mug in the paper.

In all the institutions I've taught at and attended, most administrators (deans and so on) held faculty positions and continued to teach in the department where they held faculty positions. There are occasions where the highest admins (Provost, Chancellor, President) at a university may not be faculty, but most deans, assistant deans, associate deans, and directors are faculty members and are understood to retain full academic freedom in their classrooms, in their publications, and in any and all activities pursued except when explicitly acting in their administrative function.
Now you are hog wallering to try to extricate yourself from your incorrect statement. Deans, for the most part, are still academicians and enjoy tenure. However, other than protections from tenure, even faculty members are subject to being canned for radical speech. Anyone without a teaching post is fair game.
 
The fact that it is a government institution does not change a thing. Why don't you ask a couple of celebrity former FBI agents who found this out.
Please name the "celebrity former FBI agents" who were fired for exercising their 1st Amendment rights on matters unrelated to their official duties.

As a counter example, I'll cite the Atlanta Fire Chief who won a large settlement when he was fired for writing a book:

https://www.nbcnews.com/feature/nbc-out/fired-after-writing-anti-gay-book-ex-fire-chief-set-n921276
 
Academia is mostly liberal and they do hire some idiots. I am glad this dean, resigned or was fired. That is a good start. This matters.

I will also tell you that many in academia are not liberal and they can care less about politics. The thing about conservatives in higher ed is that they want education and politics to be separate, and on the other side, the liberals want political propaganda. Most good teachers just want to teach... it is the really bad ones who have the biggest voices and encourage only one thought.

Higher Education is also a business. They gotta attract students to keep their doors open. The faster the internet, the bigger the amenities (pool, climbing wall, indoor running tracks and football team - go Dawgs) the easier it is to attract customers / students. The universities spend a lot of time managing amenities and not enough time reviewing who they hire and what they are teaching. They have to keep the doors open. Don't get me started on tenure.

The bottom line is: parents who are paying for college, the community, and our lawmakers need to be more vocal towards ridiculous professors... Americans need change agents outside of the system. Our outrage does matter.

On the positive side, If you ask me, the pendulum has swung just about as far in the liberal direction that it can. I think this "U of A thing" is just a start of a trend. At least I hope so.

The best professors encourage free thought. Our country needs more of them.
 
Good point, it's always possible college students are fooling their parents. But we have an agreement with them for random drug testing. A parent shows up at random times, they pee in the cup, and their scientist parents administer the at home drug tests. They haven't popped positive yet. They are also maintaining pretty good GPAs (3.3+) in Chemistry and Physics majors, so while we can't be sure that the drinking and partying are never occurring, we are confident that it is not derailing the academic purpose of going to college.
I'm glad my parents were an engineer and a liberal arts major. I graduated Thank Lawdy, not Cum Laude. Then I had to go learn everything I was supposed to learn in college re:education. I'm what they call a "late bloomer". :bounce:
 
Thread starter #51

dwhee87

Senior Member
High school didn't prepare me for college, and college didn't prepare me for a career. That I ended up in a career that matched my degree was just short of good luck.
 

Robert28

Senior Member
I am very happy that my daughter chose to attend a local University for her undergrad Vs. one of the big communist organizations. She is surrounded by kids mostly from the northern Atlanta suburbs where most of the kids have conservative leaning parents. Sure there are some lefty's but the majority of the kids were raised conservative or libertarian. Furthermore, she will graduate with her undergrad degree basically debt free.

The only issue I have with her is that she ditched studying physics and now is studying to become a liar, cheat and thief.
You mean she’s a political science major now?😂😂😂
 

Patriot44

Senior Member
You mean she’s a political science major now?😂😂😂
My wife and I have joked for years that she is going to make a great politician. Ever since she was early teens, you could tell her to clean her room and after a 10 min argument, you would be cleaning her room for her while she sat on the couch eating ice cream.

As a senior in her AP Psyc class, the teacher said, Lil Miss Pat, I know that you are Catholic and do not believe in abortion, but this weeks assignment is to prepare and debate as to why abortion should be legal. 100!
 
High school didn't prepare me for college, and college didn't prepare me for a career. That I ended up in a career that matched my degree was just short of good luck.
High school definitely prepared me for college. College attempted to prepare me for my career. Little did I know the economic and financial outlook for PHD's in partying was fairly limited. That's why it was a good thing I also got a BBA in Accounting. I had a fall back position once I realized there was no money in partying. Mark me, I didn't fail at partying for lack of trying. The economic fluctuations of partying is what finally did me in. That and the rent was past due and the landlord didn't think it was funny.:bounce:
 
High school definitely prepared me for college. College attempted to prepare me for my career. Little did I know the economic and financial outlook for PHD's in partying was fairly limited. That's why it was a good thing I also got a BBA in Accounting. I had a fall back position once I realized there was no money in partying. Mark me, I didn't fail at partying for lack of trying. The economic fluctuations of partying is what finally did me in. That and the rent was past due and the landlord didn't think it was funny.:bounce:

Sounds like we were running in parallel universes in college.

Glad I made it out alive.

Glad I graduated.

Most glad that I made it out with my then-girlfriend-now-wife. She was a beacon then that kept me getting too far out to sea. She still is to this day some 25+ years later.
 
Higher Education is also a business. They gotta attract students to keep their doors open. The faster the internet, the bigger the amenities (pool, climbing wall, indoor running tracks and football team - go Dawgs) the easier it is to attract customers / students. The universities spend a lot of time managing amenities and not enough time reviewing who they hire and what they are teaching. They have to keep the doors open. Don't get me started on tenure.

The bottom line is: parents who are paying for college, the community, and our lawmakers need to be more vocal towards ridiculous professors... Americans need change agents outside of the system. Our outrage does matter.
Even though ridiculous professors are most obvious by social media posts, the most offensive thing I've seen is actually happening in the classroom. College is supposed to be about learning, yet there are little or no quality control mechanisms in many colleges, and professors are rampantly gifting grades. In many cases, admins are pressuring professors to gift grades.

What I mean is this: I don't care so much about offensive social media posts here and there. I do care that students are passing college composition without any real writing skills. Students are passing college algebra and Calculus without the skills promised to the accrediting agencies. Students are passing college Physics, not because they are competent in the material, but because the professors don't have the backbone to stand up to the whiny students (and often administrative pressure).
 
Please name the "celebrity former FBI agents" who were fired for exercising their 1st Amendment rights on matters unrelated to their official duties.

As a counter example, I'll cite the Atlanta Fire Chief who won a large settlement when he was fired for writing a book:

https://www.nbcnews.com/feature/nbc-out/fired-after-writing-anti-gay-book-ex-fire-chief-set-n921276
Peter Strzok tweets were political. Normally what you would consider covered by the 1st, but he got canned.

Here is what the court found with regard to the Chief:

he decision by U.S. District Judge Leigh Martin May granted the city's motion for summary judgement on half a dozen legal arguments, rejecting as unconstitutional only the city's pre-clearance rules for outside employment.

Cochran was fired after he wrote a book in which he declared homosexuality and having multiple sexual partners "vile," "vulgar," and "inappropriate." He then filed a federal lawsuit against the city and Mayor Kasim Reed, in which he was represented by The Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), a nonprofit conservative Christian group.

In a 50-page ruling, the court found that Cochran's book, while written on his own time, was disseminated by a supervisor at the workplace. According to the decision, Cochran's status as fire chief made it "not unreasonable for the city to fear" his views might cause "public erosion of trust in the fire department."

The court also rejected Cochran's claim to denial of due process because, as an "at-will" employee of the city, he was subject to dismissal with or without cause.

The only issue the court ruled in Cochran's favor was in declaring the city's pre-clearance rules invite "unbridled discretion" in that they give Atlanta's Board of Ethics no definitive standards for determining whether the outside employment an employee seeks could pose a conflict of interest.

"This does not pass constitutional muster," Judge May wrote.
 
I'm glad my parents were an engineer and a liberal arts major. I graduated Thank Lawdy, not Cum Laude. Then I had to go learn everything I was supposed to learn in college re:education. I'm what they call a "late bloomer". :bounce:
I got my foolish ways out of the way mostly before I got to college. I learned to party hard after I studied hard in college. Compared to my angelic sisters, I was a late blooming black sheep of the family. I have now completely outdone all of them.
 
We'll see if his 1st Amendment lawsuit gets him a $1.2 Million settlement like the fire chief's did. I'm not sure what the FBI rules are for bias against parties they are investigating. I would hope public officials would recuse themselves when they harbor this level of bias against parties they are investigating. While the speech itself is likely covered by the 1st Amendment, the bias it demonstrates and the failure to disclose the bias to superiors or recuse oneself from the investigation may not be.
 
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