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Thread starter #1

Bow Only

Senior Member
This just looks like a rock, but to the trained eye, it says much more. I've never seen anything like this before. It was found on the large Woodland site we used to look and it's just a smooth rock. It's not even much when you hold it. I'm not even sure why I kept it, but after washing it off and examining it, the entire rock has been worked. It was pecked down to it's current shape and smoothed down with something that would give our finest sandpaper a run for its money. I showed it to the head archaeologist and he didn't know what it was. The amount of time that went into making this is absurd and it's not shaped like anything. I could see it being an inlay nose to a wooden bird totem, but even that is stretching it. No clue what this is or was. It's just a rock now.

I have seen things before that would make your mouth drop open. I have friends who have very nice collections. My collection is a 3 on a scale of 1 to 10, their collections are 8's and 9's. One friend has an incredible piece that he called a "Shaman Stone." Since nothing I have seen was even close to this piece, that name was fine with me. It is an 8 inch piece of hard stone that was 3/4 inch wide and square. It is straight as an arrow and could not be made with more precision. It is an incredible work of art just to get it square for that length. It would serve no mechanical purpose but would be highly revered because of the time it took to make it. It was a water find from many years ago. My "rock" doesn't even compare to this piece. You know it is something, my rock not so much.

Just because my unknown piece isn't much to look at, here is a pic of a piece from my friends collection. It's a personal find of his and it's not even close to his best piece.
 

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Thread starter #3

Bow Only

Senior Member
Amazing, beautiful point!
Isn't it great that there are still mysteries?
When do we get to see "the best point"?
I don't have a best point, I've just got some good field grade stuff. I can show you my Dad's favorite point, it's coming up. Of course he found it.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
I don't have a best point, I've just got some good field grade stuff. I can show you my Dad's favorite point, it's coming up. Of course he found it.
I've always likened some of this stuff to an archaeologist a thousand years from now trying to figure out and oil filter wrench, a pizza cutter, eyelash curler, or a Tupperware pickle keeper. :)

You don't know Rick Schwartz by chance?
 
Thread starter #5

Bow Only

Senior Member
I've always likened some of this stuff to an archaeologist a thousand years from now trying to figure out and oil filter wrench, a pizza cutter, eyelash curler, or a Tupperware pickle keeper. :)

You don't know Rick Schwartz by chance?
I don't know Rick.
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Staff member
No, I'm an old FL boy and I don't get out much. lol

They had extensive collections. Mr. Buford had the best one I`ve ever seen. And he had the most points, all found by himself. Most were found on one huge site. Matt, the number of points alone were unbelievable. As far as I know, none were ever photographed or published. He just didn`t care for the publicity. More Woodland and Mississippian than anything else but he had some of all time periods.
 
Thread starter #9

Bow Only

Senior Member
They had extensive collections. Mr. Buford had the best one I`ve ever seen. And he had the most points, all found by himself. Most were found on one huge site. Matt, the number of points alone were unbelievable. As far as I know, none were ever photographed or published. He just didn`t care for the publicity. More Woodland and Mississippian than anything else but he had some of all time periods.
There is a collection in FL, primarily old water finds that I would consider to have the highest quality artifacts in the SE. I don't know what happened to it after Will committed suicide, but the volume of G10's and museum quality pieces is staggering. None of his stuff has been published or seen.
 
I don't know Rick.
I don't know Rick.
Rick and Eddie Parker were a couple of Florida boys I used to hang out with. They did a lot of diving. Rick had one of the best collections of Newnans and coral Hillsboroughs that I've ever seen, and a bunch of nice Paleo stuff and fossils. They were both friends of Claude Van Order.
 
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