What’s the purpose?

How did Carter, as a senator, governor, or president, help solve this inequality problem? Good question.

Also is that a Georgia school curriculum question?
 
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NOYDB

Senior Member
I don't think the question was related to Carter's youth but the way of life when Carter was young. The schools being segregated was just given as an inequality example.

So the question would be what did Carter do about it, meaning inequality, not school segregation. As mentioned, it would be when he was a senator or governor perhaps.

He did say this at his governor's inauguration;

After easily defeating his Republican opponent, Carter surprised most of his Georgia supporters and attracted national attention during a short, twelve-minute inaugural address when he proclaimed that the time for segregation had ended. "No poor, rural, weak, or black person," he declared, "should ever have to bear the additional burden of being deprived of the opportunity of an education, a job, or simple justice."
By time he was inaugurated for office the SCOTUS had ruled. So that was so risky.
 
By time he was inaugurated for office the SCOTUS had ruled. So that was so risky.
Regardless the question is asking what did Carter do about inequality? Maybe he did nothing and that was the teacher's point. I'd really have to see the lesson plan to know the answer the teacher was seeking.
 
By time he was inaugurated for office the SCOTUS had ruled. So that was so risky.
I think my county integrated in 1968. So regardless of when it was ruled, it was still risky in 1968. I think Carter was a senator then or earlier. I'm pretty sure there was plenty of inequality during Carter's term as governor.
Now what he did about it, I'm not sure.
 
Is this purposeful or do you really not understand how to read the question?
I think the teacher did not understand how to pose the question.

She stated that when Jimmy Carter was growing up not all people were treated equally.

Then her question was, “How did Jimmy Carter help solve this problem?”

She/He should’ve said, “Later on in his life, how did Jimmy Carter help solve this problem?”

Oh wait!
May I use gender pronouns Arthur?
 

rayjay

Senior Member
The only lasting legacy that Jimmah has is abandoning the Shah of Iran leading to much misery world wide .
 

dwhee87

Senior Member
I don't think the question was related to Carter's youth but the way of life when Carter was young. The schools being segregated was just given as an inequality example.

So the question would be what did Carter do about it, meaning inequality, not school segregation. As mentioned, it would be when he was a senator or governor perhaps.

He did say this at his governor's inauguration;

After easily defeating his Republican opponent, Carter surprised most of his Georgia supporters and attracted national attention during a short, twelve-minute inaugural address when he proclaimed that the time for segregation had ended. "No poor, rural, weak, or black person," he declared, "should ever have to bear the additional burden of being deprived of the opportunity of an education, a job, or simple justice."
If the teacher was expecting a 2nd grade kid to make that distinction, it's at best a poorly crafted question.
 
If the teacher was expecting a 2nd grade kid to make that distinction, it's at best a poorly crafted question.
Unless the teacher had previously covered what Carter had done about the equality problem in her lesson. It was still worded beyond the comprehension of a second grader.
 

TomC

Senior Member
Some of the more math savvy kids are doing calculus in the 10th/11th grades nowadays. Way different than 50 years ago, (in the non-metro-ATL parts of GA at least).
While the VAST........VAST majority of 10/11th graders across the state would struggle to do 7th/8th grade math. Math grades even at your BETTER.......BEST public schools are skewed by extra credit assignments , retakes, bonus points, yada yada yada. Make the 10/11th graders from across this state sit down at a desk and take a moderately rigorous grade level math assessment and grade it HONESTLY and the results would be SHOCKING. Parents are VERY mislead by the grades there darlings bring home. They are SKEWED in one way or the other and this all goes back to the absolute lack of FUNDAMENTAL math skills the kids are coming out of elementary school with.......or should I say without even from the SO-CALLED best public schools in this state.
 

Robert28

Senior Member
And I appreciate the thankless work they do.
My mom was a retired public school teacher. She never wanted a “thanks” she just wanted her check and to not have bratty kids. Too the day she died she cursed public education, and I mean literally cursed it. 24 years in the gubbment skool system will have that effect on you.
 

Oldstick

Senior Member
But I still appreciate the thankless effort our teachers put forth trying to educate. Despite the huge obstacles they are up against with today's society in general, the lack of support from parents, lack of solid family structures, etc.

And I fully understand Robert28's mother's sentiments, no doubt. Still we owe her a huge debt for trying. And very sorry for your loss Robert28.
 
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Some of the more math savvy kids are doing calculus in the 10th/11th grades nowadays. Way different than 50 years ago, (in the non-metro-ATL parts of GA at least).

I graduated high school in 1976. Some of my friends were studying calculus then.
 
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