What does the "washing" actually do?

Thread starter #1
1 Corinthians 6:11
And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God.

Exactly what did that washing give us? Salvation from the sins in verses 9&10 or the ability to perhaps keep us from performing those sins?
 
Thread starter #2
1 Corinthians 6:9-10
Do you not know that the wicked will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: Neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who submit to or perform homosexual acts, 10nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor verbal abusers, nor swindlers, will inherit the kingdom of God.

Keep in mind, the wicked will not inherit the kingdom of God. The sin that really touches me the most is drunkards. I have a lot of alcoholics in my extended family. The addictive behavior is strong in my family.

Through God many within my family have overcome. Perhaps some haven't.

So again, is the ability to overcome proof one received the washing or does the actual washing itself annul the sins on that list?
 
Something to keep in mind is that there is a difference between being in sin and being unclean, thus they had separate sacrifices in the OT. You can be forgiven of sin, and still be 'unclean' in God's sight. In order for Jews to enter the temple they had to be 'sprinkled' (sanctified) with the water that had been mixed with ashes of the Red Heifer sacrifice. For example, if you touched a dead person, you became 'unclean', and could not enter the temple. Touching a dead person was not sin; it just made you unclean in God's eyes for a time. Forgiveness of sin is one thing; being clean to stand before YHVH was another matter. Belief in the shed blood of Christ - being the prophesied perfect Red Heifer 'Sanctification' sacrifice - makes us clean to go before God with our needs.
 
Thread starter #4
Something to keep in mind is that there is a difference between being in sin and being unclean, thus they had separate sacrifices in the OT. You can be forgiven of sin, and still be 'unclean' in God's sight. In order for Jews to enter the temple they had to be 'sprinkled' (sanctified) with the water that had been mixed with ashes of the Red Heifer sacrifice. For example, if you touched a dead person, you became 'unclean', and could not enter the temple. Touching a dead person was not sin; it just made you unclean in God's eyes for a time. Forgiveness of sin is one thing; being clean to stand before YHVH was another matter. Belief in the shed blood of Christ - being the prophesied perfect Red Heifer 'Sanctification' sacrifice - makes us clean to go before God with our needs.
Then the sacrifice on the Cross did change something. It annulled the Red Heifer sacrifice. It took the place of the Red Heifer sacrifice.

Is that all the sacrifice on the cross did? All those songs about Jesus washing away our sins are wrong? He only took the place of a few sacrifices and ceremonies?
 
Jesus' death on the cross brought us several things: It paid the penalty of the adulterous Northern Kingdom (who God wanted to bring back) Remember, Jesus didn't come for the Jews, they were still in covenant with God. Only the Northern Kingdom 'House of Isreal' was out of covenant. That's why Jesus said He had only come FOR THE LOST SHEEP OF THE HOUSE OF ISRAEL. His death also provided our redemption (Passover) it provided our sanctification (Red Heifer) and it provided forgiveness of sin (Yom Kippur) For Jews, there is no more Red Heifer sanctification sprinkling, as that is only accessible through Jesus. There is no Temple, so there is no priest sprinking with water. That's another proof of Jesus as the Messiah, BTW. The Messiah has to show up before the temple was destroyed, and when the ruler of Jerusalem was no longer from the tribe of Judah. (sorry....I digress)
 
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