What ever happened to acid rain?

Thread starter #1

NOYDB

Senior Member
The cost you pay for gas is more because of past fake news being added to regulations.
 

JustUs4All

Sweeper Upper Mod
It got milked dry of its value in the redistribution of wealth plan so it was abandoned for crises of more value, ie global warming / climate change, etc.
 

GoldDot40

Senior Member
Do you still get water spots on your vehicle that you can't wipe off after it rains? That's "acid" rain.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
If you lived here in the southern Appalachian Mountains, you wouldn't have to ask. It's scorched the trees bad above 5,000'. Fog the same PH as vinegar sometimes. It's killing the trout streams, too. Ground level ozone is killing the foliage on a lot of the trees here, too.

The main thing that makes me hate the climate change crap is that it takes focus away from real environmental problems like acid and mercury deposition that are killing our waters. Nobody gives a crap about that now though, because it's all about the global warming.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Mercury is the biggie that never gets discussed any more. There isn't gonna be a fish on the earth in a few decades that isn't full of the stuff.
 

sinclair1

Senior Member
If you lived here in the southern Appalachian Mountains, you wouldn't have to ask. It's scorched the trees bad above 5,000'. Fog the same PH as vinegar sometimes. It's killing the trout streams, too. Ground level ozone is killing the foliage on a lot of the trees here, too.

The main thing that makes me hate the climate change crap is that it takes focus away from real environmental problems like acid and mercury deposition that are killing our waters. Nobody gives a crap about that now though, because it's all about the global warming.
I am pretty sure your statement is fake news and all rain is the same, or was that batteries :bounce:
 

Swamprat

Senior Member
Mercury is a huge threat, both fresh and salt. Add the microplastics and there won't be a fish left worth eating in 25 years.
 
Thread starter #13

NOYDB

Senior Member
Do you still get water spots on your vehicle that you can't wipe off after it rains? That's "acid" rain.
Never have but then I don't let water drops sit on the vehicle after the rain and the sun shines. Or I wax it and put something between the spots and the finish.
 
Thread starter #14

NOYDB

Senior Member
I am pretty sure your statement is fake news and all rain is the same, or was that batteries :bounce:
It is and they are.

Because we know that rain falling on the mountain tops is different from the rain falling from the same clouds into the valleys. It only burns trees above certain elevations. 1,000 feet lower and it's different rain drops, from the same clouds from the same weather front that has crossed half a dozen states.
 
It is and they are.

Because we know that rain falling on the mountain tops is different from the rain falling from the same clouds into the valleys. It only burns trees above certain elevations. 1,000 feet lower and it's different rain drops, from the same clouds from the same weather front that has crossed half a dozen states.
Yes, Mr. Genius, the acidity increases with elevation. Of course, that's just direct scientific evidence, not your opinion. Yes, at about 6,000' elevation here, the fog and precipitation often has about the acidity of vinegar. The same is not true at 2,000'. What do those scientists that measure the PH of precipitation know, though?

And if you still think that a Ray-o-Vac battery is as good as a Duracell, then you are beyond reach of logic.
 
Thread starter #16

NOYDB

Senior Member
Yes, Mr. Genius, the acidity increases with elevation. Of course, that's just direct scientific evidence, not your opinion. Yes, at about 6,000' elevation here, the fog and precipitation often has about the acidity of vinegar. The same is not true at 2,000'. What do those scientists that measure the PH of precipitation know, though?

And if you still think that a Ray-o-Vac battery is as good as a Duracell, then you are beyond reach of logic.
I can read and parse an english sentence. I know that Ray-o-vac and Duracell are brand names and don't mean that the batteries are physically different.

On October 24, 2014, Procter & Gamble announced it would spin off Duracell in 2015 as part of a wider restructuring scheme. On November 14, 2014, Berkshire Hathaway declared its intent to acquire Duracell in an all-stock deal, consisting of $4.7 billion worth of P&G stock then owned by Berkshire Hathaway.
Sure it's the same until someone decides to cut costs are save on mfc materials, but they will still have the same name and color scheme. Which will make them identical to what came before.

False news is still false news no matter how much it may have fooled the reader. Rain falling on the plain has the same ph as the rain falling from the same clouds when they pass over a mountain range. Ph doesn't change in a rain drop as it falls from 5,000 feet to 500 feet.

My problem is I am too logical.
 

sinclair1

Senior Member
Yes, Mr. Genius, the acidity increases with elevation. Of course, that's just direct scientific evidence, not your opinion. Yes, at about 6,000' elevation here, the fog and precipitation often has about the acidity of vinegar. The same is not true at 2,000'. What do those scientists that measure the PH of precipitation know, though?

And if you still think that a Ray-o-Vac battery is as good as a Duracell, then you are beyond reach of logic.
That same air breathes different up thar in NC Hillbilly land too.
 
Thread starter #18

NOYDB

Senior Member
That same air breathes different up thar in NC Hillbilly land too.
Your perception is that it is different. It's the same, to a chemist.
 
I can read and parse an english sentence. I know that Ray-o-vac and Duracell are brand names and don't mean that the batteries are physically different.



Sure it's the same until someone decides to cut costs are save on mfc materials, but they will still have the same name and color scheme. Which will make them identical to what came before.

False news is still false news no matter how much it may have fooled the reader. Rain falling on the plain has the same ph as the rain falling from the same clouds when they pass over a mountain range. Ph doesn't change in a rain drop as it falls from 5,000 feet to 500 feet.

My problem is I am too logical.
Go buy some Ray-o-Vacs. Go buy some Duracells. Put them in the same device, turn it on, and time how long they last. Hint: There is a BIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIG difference. And yes, PH of precipitation varies with altitude, Or do you not believe scientific measurements? I'm not gonna have a battle of wits with an unarmed man.
 
Thread starter #20

NOYDB

Senior Member
I'm not gonna have a battle of wits with an unarmed man.
You are out classed. And apparently not equiped to contend in such a battle.

There is no measurement of rain drops changing the ph with elevation. When a drop leaves a cloud it has the ph it will ever have. The ph of water is independent of elevation.

Unless of course it is branded to be sold at wholefoods.
 
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