What type of Plant or Tree is this?

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spencer12

Senior Member
While out today planting oak seedlings and doing some hinge cutting, I remembered this mystery plant I noticed last year. It appears to be growing as a bush or shrub and has small fruit on it. It also seems like it wants to vine around other trees but technically it hasnt. The deer don't seem to be eating it at the moment but they're annihilating my hinge cut trees and bushes from last year. This is in South Ga. in a damp bottomland area. What is it?
 

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spencer12

Senior Member
Whatcha hinge cutting?
Mostly sweetgum which I hate, privet, and other non preferred timber species. Younger tupelo trees occasionally (which is what the deer seem to like the most when they resprout). A lot of japanese honeysuckle takes over the hinge cuts along with green briar which is another source of browse they really seem to like.
 
I have some at my dads, It behaves ok but will re sprout from any root left behind. I had pulled it all out a few years ago but it came back. forms a big bush/bramble. Birds love to nest in it but I dont know if anything eats it.
 
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spencer12

Senior Member
I have some at my dads, It behaves ok but will re sprout from any root left behind. I had pulled it all out a few years ago but it came back. forms a big bush/bramble. Birds love to nest in it but I dont know if anything eats it.
I just googled it and the fruit looks similar but the leaves aren't the same, so I don't think it's Russian Olive but I could be wrong.

After looking again I believe it may be Autumn Olive.
 
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bilgerat

Senior Member
ELAEAGNUS,{aka Russian olive} comes in a lot of different varieties, if the bottom of the leaves are silver colored its prob thorny elaeagnus, "silverberry elaeagnus pungens ", which is the most common in the SE.It will have long nasty thorns off the main stalks that will hurt you. birds love the seeds ..."olives"
 
I don't know what type of tree, shrub etc that this is BUT I've never seen any of it before in the area of Lincoln County.

However, I do have way too much of those dreaded sweetgun trees as they are nothing but a nuisance to me in every respect with no real value except to squirrels. I hate those little round balls that are filled with seeds too as when the squirrels start knawing on them, it looks like it is raining seeds from up above. If you cut them down 10 times, then come back a few months later, you still will see these dang trees growing in every direction. :banginghe:banginghe:banginghe
 

fishtail

Senior Member
ELAEAGNUS,{aka Russian olive} comes in a lot of different varieties, if the bottom of the leaves are silver colored its prob thorny elaeagnus, "silverberry elaeagnus pungens ", which is the most common in the SE.It will have long nasty thorns off the main stalks that will hurt you. birds love the seeds ..."olives"
Those "thorns" are an average of 1 1/2" and protrude backwards, allowing the plant to climb up and over itself and other vegetation around it.
 

Danny Leigh

GONetwork Member
Definitely silverthorn or thorny elaeagnus, but not Russian olive which is a different type of elaeagnus. . Nows a good time to control silverthorn by cutting it back to the stump and spraying the stump with a 20-25% solution of 41% glyphosate. the plant blooms in the fall and the fruit should still be developing. They'll be viable in a month or two.



From "A Management Guide for Invasive plants in Southern Forests"

https://www.srs.fs.fed.us/pubs/gtr/gtr_srs131.pdf

1549885339469.png
 

Mark K

Senior Member
Mostly sweetgum which I hate, privet, and other non preferred timber species. Younger tupelo trees occasionally (which is what the deer seem to like the most when they resprout). A lot of japanese honeysuckle takes over the hinge cuts along with green briar which is another source of browse they really seem to like.
I know privet can take over, but the deer and quail love it.
 
What IS a hinge cut?
Never heard of that except dropping larger trees.
Hinge cutting is done by simply back “cutting partially” through a tree or branch and letting it fall but not killing the tree.
Often dangerous to the cutter due to barberchair.
Thought to make habitat better by some.
Usually overdone by more people than really those who have a need for it.
It allows sunlight in and keeps the tree alive if done well.
It creates a bedding area in bad weather if you stay out of there long enough.
15 or so years ago it was more popular. Not sure if many still do or what.
More can be harmed than good in my opinion but sweetgums need cut out anyway. They seem worthless and will take over your forest eventually.
Privit trees are another that hinge cutting can help habitat if your opening up the canopy. I see it as blocking paths long term more often than not if you don’t plan well where your tree is to fall.
Any amateur can make the cut but getting better habitat out of it takes skill and luck. If your going to do it be careful what you cut and don’t cut too many. Works well with smaller trees in certain strategic areas.
 

oldguy

Senior Member
YOU DON'T WANT PRIVET. REGARDLESS OF HOW MUCH DEER LIKE IT.
I WANT PRIVET.
I GOT PRIVET.
True, privet is non-native and invasive, but when you take into account the myriad of wildlife that benefit from the food, cover, nesting sites,etc. that it provides I can't imagine a native plant that fulfills it's place- least not in SOWEGA.
 
ELAEAGNUS, I have it all over my lease in Upson County. Very invasive. Deer will eat the young growth and it makes excellent cover and bedding but it will take over the property.
 
Yep, that's thorny Eleagnus. It's nasty stuff. And privet is the scourge of the earth. If I could push a button right now and kill every privet bush in America, I would run to the button.
 
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