Where would you buy land in Georgia?

Thread starter #21
I'm about a year out from starting the process of buying a small tract to hunt and live on. Been researching the subject pretty thoroughly and I hate to say it but tracts in the southern half of Alabama are starting to interest me . In Georgia I'd be looking at the counties near Taylor County or in the Laurens - Dodge vicinity.
I have been looking at some of the Black Belt region in AL and I agree. Taylor county has quite a few properties I have checked out also.

I drive from SW GA to Western MS for work and go through much of Mid and South Alabama. It looks like great country!
 

mattuga

Senior Member
For the record I am a poor quality big buck hunter, haven't killed a deer in 5 years or a buck in 8 years. Plenty of chances, does get the pass.
wow

I posted my rant on the wrong thread...


I'm not a great deer hunter but I like deer hunting and seeing deer. I'm not a big buck hunter but would like to have access to property to do so. I haven't killed a deer in 4 years due to switching to trying to kill a mature buck and haven't been successful. I no longer have been hunting Uncle's property which has a planned doe harvest every season 10+ deer a sit kinda place. Plenty of basket 8's around 90-100" but I've never killed a mature deer.

--------------------
Here is my take. No hogs.

Now, for the rant. If you need corn to shoot young dumb stupid deer, the only person calling you a deer hunter is you. Corn is not the end all to challenging deer hunting, unless you like killing young dumb stupid deer. Old does are slick, they are just as slick around a feeder. Corn promotes nocturnal activity. Just go pour a bag out and watch the deer first thing you are going to see is yearling deer, followed by their mother. There is a shot during archery season that the corn pile might help you get a chance at a good archery buck. But he will be very slick about coming in to the corn pile.
As far as the hunters who do shoot a deer or two to eat over a corn pile, it is now legal, statewide. For all the folks who have been screaming about the deer population, the doe herd. This shows you just how much the DNR believes you are going to hurt the herd.

In their on writing, they show no significant increase in deer harvest in the counties where bait has been legal.

The sky is falling


It was a little bit excessive of a rant and was posted on the wrong thread...but I am telling you people who pay to hunt a lease will be killing more young does as will people with small parcel who never really hunted. I did not say it'd make it easier to shoot mature deer so half of what you said is true and I agree. Most want to kill a big buck and like me either don't have the time to chase on or the patience to do it. That is me but I don't kill does in areas with low deer populations. And to your point I am just saying it is going to make it too easy for people to shoot younger does. Hope I'm wrong.

I wouldn't buy deer hunting property unless I knew the area and deer population in any county but especially N GA. The GA DNR County map of kills is the best place to start.

Putting out corn at my Twiggs County lease will have the pigs and bear running the deer off your spot. Much better off with a food plot.


s&r
I can tell you that there are plenty of does in Pickens County. Hunting creek bottoms with no food plots, I have seen groups with as many as 6 does come through. We could use more doe days.
 

Triple C

Senior Member
Easy answer... Within no more than 2 hrs and preferably less than where you live. And big parcels bordering property. Keep those 2 requirements in mind and you will know the right tract when you see it for the 1st time
 

Nicodemus

FREELANCE ADMINISTRATOR
Yeah, I would love to have some land near any of the plantations in the Lee, Doughtery, Baker area. Maybe I will just need to keep looking and save the down payment. When the deal arises, jump on it! Thanks Nicodemus.

Most of those farms and plantations make very good neighbors if you give them the chance. They`ll show you the same respect that you show them. I know this from experience.
 
Thread starter #28
Easy answer... Within no more than 2 hrs and preferably less than where you live. And big parcels bordering property. Keep those 2 requirements in mind and you will know the right tract when you see it for the 1st time
That's a good point. Sometimes I feel like I'm overcomplicating it with all the research. Maybe just choose one based on your requirements and then check it out.
 
Harris county on 7,500 acres right in the middle of Foxworthy, Realtree farms, Waffle house owner and Michael Waddell's farm. $42 million and I would be set!!!
 

wks41

Senior Member
My family and I purchased a 38 acre tract in NW ga last year. We set a budget and looked within those parameters. My biggest goal was to be within an hour of the house. Living in Woodstock, that creates a challenge. I literally spent my free time browning the net looking for land in the general area I wanted. There are several main sites that post the same properties. After seeing the same land for sale I google local realest brokers in the area, there you will find listing not available on the big sites. I would also recommend talking to locals where you want to buy. Everyone knows someone trying to sell something. Where I finally found my land was calling broker selling bigger chunks of land than I was ever able to afford. Some of the bigger tracts will subdivide. The original tract we bought on was 360acres for sale. 180 was sold, we bought 38 and then the other 142 sold. Before we purchased I went and met the property owners that boardered the land. We got very lucky, We have great neighbors, it’s 40min from my house, and good land with much bigger bucks than I was expecting. Also, be able to see what you can turn the property into. Looking for a turnkey parcel will be expensive and imo less rewarding. Good luck
 
Georgia is typically not a good state to buy land in my opinion unless you find a great deal and get it cheap..Growing pine trees usually results in about a 4% investment over time..If you finance the land and don't pay cash then you will be losing money. Farmland in SW Georgia would be a better option.
 
I'm about a year out from starting the process of buying a small tract to hunt and live on. Been researching the subject pretty thoroughly and I hate to say it but tracts in the southern half of Alabama are starting to interest me . In Georgia I'd be looking at the counties near Taylor County or in the Laurens - Dodge vicinity.
I had been looking for a piece of land for a year or so when I bought mine several months ago. I'm not tied to either state and Alabama seemed like the better deal. I think I got more for my money than I would have in Ga.
 
N Ga just lost it's best asset of pay to play, poor quality big buck hunters will now kill the only population producer. They will get their meat doe now very easy while chasing the big guy they will never kill. I REALLY hope they drastically reduce the doe days to correlate with the corn rule. Anyone with a low deer population and "big buck" hunters knows it. I don't care your position on the ruling of legality, crappy deer hunters will succeed in N GA where it used to take effort. Daddy will make little to no effort to bring home the meat doe in a region where we don't need to kill ANY does. I'm sure there are some N GA properties that need thinning of the herd but it not common North of Macon into the mountains. Nathan Deal is probably getting a sweet sweet check from State Farm on this "Deal". The legalese guys may think this is a win but when every Tom Dick and Harry can corn in a 2 yo doe the population will crash just like State Farm paid Deal to make happen. I am ashamed no sportsmen with clout could do anything about it. Clearly the biologists didn't agree, can anyone tell me the GA DNR biologists agreed with this decision? CKillmaster? Surely not?
give it a rest
and post this where it belongstest
you have no idea what will happen
 
buying next to a good farm or plantation would be ideal ...got invited on a few bird hunts on a couple plantations in Ben Hill county and the owners were probably the nicest, most down to earth folks I think I have ever met. If our country was filled with people like that we wouldn't have all the chaos. One thing about south Georgia is neighbors still help neighbors. You would think they were family the way they help each other ( the ones I have met anyway). Nice to see that still exists.
 
Just bought land 6 miles across the Savannah river and am shocked by the deer population. Most of it is duck impoundments (180 acres) but I've never seen a better deer population. Reminds me of GA in the good old days.
 
Just bought land 6 miles across the Savannah river and am shocked by the deer population. Most of it is duck impoundments (180 acres) but I've never seen a better deer population. Reminds me of GA in the good old days.
I have a friend that has a lease on the savannah river not too far from Augusta and he says they are covered up in deer as well. The number of deer he sees during hunting season is amazing. They must have some sort of food source to support it and they don't plant or feed ...they just have tons of deer.
 
N Ga just lost it's best asset of pay to play, poor quality big buck hunters will now kill the only population producer. They will get their meat doe now very easy while chasing the big guy they will never kill. I REALLY hope they drastically reduce the doe days to correlate with the corn rule. Anyone with a low deer population and "big buck" hunters knows it. I don't care your position on the ruling of legality, crappy deer hunters will succeed in N GA where it used to take effort. Daddy will make little to no effort to bring home the meat doe in a region where we don't need to kill ANY does. I'm sure there are some N GA properties that need thinning of the herd but it not common North of Macon into the mountains. Nathan Deal is probably getting a sweet sweet check from State Farm on this "Deal". The legalese guys may think this is a win but when every Tom Dick and Harry can corn in a 2 yo doe the population will crash just like State Farm paid Deal to make happen. I am ashamed no sportsmen with clout could do anything about it. Clearly the biologists didn't agree, can anyone tell me the GA DNR biologists agreed with this decision? CKillmaster? Surely not?

Nearly every deer I have killed in the northern zone over the past ten years on any tract under 150 acres or so has had corn in stomach, and I didn't put a kernel out. Making it legal isn't going to change anything. As far a "Crappy hunters" succeeding, you all act like killing a deer is difficult to begin with and corn is some form of deer crack that makes it easy. Sitting on a power line, pipeline, acorn tree, persimmon tree, etc..and shooting the first 2 year old doe that walks up is actually easier than hunting over a bait pile, because you have to carry the 50lb bag of corn to a spot to pour out, where as the oak tree is already there. I won't put out any corn now that it is legal, and I have never killed a deer over it. However, I hunted the Lowcountry of South Carolina for years and the Southern Zone of Georgia since baiting was made legal there. I can tell you from experience, it isn't going to change anything. I'm not pro baiting by any stretch of the imagination, but I don't see any reason the people who want to shouldn't be able to do it legally. They are already doing it illegally anyway. Like I said, it won't change anything. The people with the good tracks of land and reasonable hunters per acre are still going to be successful with or without corn. The guys in areas with low populations that are hunting 250 acres with 24 other hunters are still going to complain about not seeing deer. A few more bags of corn being put out in the woods isn't going to change that.
 
Thread starter #38
Harris county on 7,500 acres right in the middle of Foxworthy, Realtree farms, Waffle house owner and Michael Waddell's farm. $42 million and I would be set!!!
Haha what a dream Beagler! $42 million!!
 
Thread starter #39
buying next to a good farm or plantation would be ideal ...got invited on a few bird hunts on a couple plantations in Ben Hill county and the owners were probably the nicest, most down to earth folks I think I have ever met. If our country was filled with people like that we wouldn't have all the chaos. One thing about south Georgia is neighbors still help neighbors. You would think they were family the way they help each other ( the ones I have met anyway). Nice to see that still exists.
I have always found the same around here! Very few people are that way anymore. I know many older landowners whether they have small or large tracts always take care of their neighbors.
 
Georgia is typically not a good state to buy land in my opinion unless you find a great deal and get it cheap..Growing pine trees usually results in about a 4% investment over time..If you finance the land and don't pay cash then you will be losing money. Farmland in SW Georgia would be a better option.
That’s the truth there and if everything doesn’t go right your dogging pretty heavenly into that 4%.
 
Top