Who remembers NASCAR?

Milkman you bringing him up revived my memory some what. Unlike today, over half of the field back then, were independents. Like, Freddy Fryar, James Hylton, Jimmy Spencer, Ronnie Thomas, Buddy Arrington, Tiny Lund, Wendell Scott and Neil Castles. They built their cars, with used parts from the factory teams. Most of them had very little money, and most of them had day jobs, to help them get by. They hauled their Car behind pick up trucks on an open trailer. At most they would have one set of tires, plus a few that got handed down to them, from the Big money team, that had a few laps on them. They could not afford to wreck their car, because in a lot of cases, it was the only one they had, so even if they had a good running car, they tended to stay out of the way, and try to finish a race rather than win it. Many times when one of them were down to their last few dollars, they would get their paycheck and find out the Bill France Sr had put a couple of hundred buck extra in the envelope. Another source of income, was doing some testing for the factory teams. Things have changed a lot since those days.
 

Milkman

Retired Moderator
Milkman you bringing him up revived my memory some what. Unlike today, over half of the field back then, were independents. Like, Freddy Fryar, James Hylton, Jimmy Spencer, Ronnie Thomas, Buddy Arrington, Tiny Lund, Wendell Scott and Neil Castles. They built their cars, with used parts from the factory teams. Most of them had very little money, and most of them had day jobs, to help them get by. They hauled their Car behind pick up trucks on an open trailer. At most they would have one set of tires, plus a few that got handed down to them, from the Big money team, that had a few laps on them. They could not afford to wreck their car, because in a lot of cases, it was the only one they had, so even if they had a good running car, they tended to stay out of the way, and try to finish a race rather than win it. Many times when one of them were down to their last few dollars, they would get their paycheck and find out the Bill France Sr had put a couple of hundred buck extra in the envelope. Another source of income, was doing some testing for the factory teams. Things have changed a lot since those days.
Bill Sr was a good guy. I was in Ormond Beach when he died. They had to pretty much shut down the main part of town for his funeral. Lots of folks came to show their respects.
 

Milkman

Retired Moderator
I was at a race at Hampton sometime in the 70s. I had my portable radio like lots did in those days to see and hear. That’s how I knew the details below.

David Pearsons Purolater Mercury’s brakes failed that day. He couldn’t stop at the pit. His crew got with the crew of another driver who was a few laps behind. By coordination between the crews this driver served as David’s brakes by allowing the Mercury to come up behind and touch his car.
David went on to finish.
You can bet that drivers crew got a good reward from Puraltor and Bill Sr.
 
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Seems like I remember that guy :flag::flag::flag:

I f I remember correctly back around 73 or 74 Petty won a race in which he was 5 laps ahead of the next closest car.
Those we the days. Can’t see that ever happening again in NASCAR.
 
Bill Sr was a good guy. I was in Ormond Beach when he died. They had to pretty much shut down the main part of town for his funeral. Lots of folks came to show their respects.
In the sixties, Bill France Sr's home phone number was posted in the public phone book. A friend was over my house and after a few beers we got into an argument about Nascar. I dont even remember what it was about, but I am sure it concerned GM vs Chrysler. About 12:30, I said I will end this argument. I got on the phone called information and got his number. I called him and woke him up, he was nice to us and spent over an hour talking to us that "morning", first to me and then to Mickey. We swapped the phone back and fourth while he moderated our argument. Then we just talked racing with him for about 30 mins. He could have been our best friend and never once complained about us waking him up and keeping him up, for what seemed like half the night. I can still picture him sitting on the side of his bed in his PJ's settling an argument and then just talking two a couple of somewhat drunks from Georgia. Can you imagine, any of his offspring doing that today. Sr loved the fans and understood they were the backbone of NASCAR.
 
He also overcame a 10 lap deficit to win a race, I just cant remember anymore, where that was, but I believe it was Dover.
was that the race they blew an engine, changed it out and got back in the race?
 
Ole hillbilly fist fight racing still exist, you're just looking in the wrong place. Old time country music still exist, confederate flags still fly too.

Keep looking in same place people find organic groceries, battery cars and vape pipes and you may never see them again. :bounce:
 
NASCAR finally banned the Hemi and the SOHC Fords so Shivey could keep up. Ain't a put down of Shiveys, just the truth. Bill France wouldn't let them run the Hemi or 427 SOHC Ford, so a lot of round track boys took off a year and went drag racing
That was probably the year that I saw Richard Petty at Yellow River Drag Way, at least I think that that was the name. The drag strip had a hump half way down and you could hardly see the finish.
 
Junior Johnson, Buck Petty, Fireball Roberts, and my kinfolks, the Bakers. We listened to the races on the radio.
I used to gather with my uncle and a few of his friends for go-cart work/tune up and a little testing afterword every Sunday. We would tinker with the engines and carts and then race them in the afternoon and I was the flagman. I also drove the water tractor and oh yea, I scraped and dragged the track too... I see it now for what it was, child labor. :bounce::bounce:

The thing that I remember the most is MRN blasting in the shop and the owner of the place screaming out, "Git em DW" every 5 minutes. :rofl:I can still smell the meth....enol in the air. :bounce:

Best times of my life. I quit watching NASCAR years a go. You couldn't pay me to watch a race these days.
 
I remember NASCAR.
I remember when the Hooters 500 came to Atlanta, I thought it was 250 of the most beautiful waitresses in the South coming to town!
:rofl:They sure help sell a lot of beer and chicken wings!
 
I won tickets this morning to meet Bobby Allison at Wild Adventures next weekend. I gotta find me something cool for him to sign.
 
In the sixties, Bill France Sr's home phone number was posted in the public phone book. A friend was over my house and after a few beers we got into an argument about Nascar. I dont even remember what it was about, but I am sure it concerned GM vs Chrysler. About 12:30, I said I will end this argument. I got on the phone called information and got his number. I called him and woke him up, he was nice to us and spent over an hour talking to us that "morning", first to me and then to Mickey. We swapped the phone back and fourth while he moderated our argument. Then we just talked racing with him for about 30 mins. He could have been our best friend and never once complained about us waking him up and keeping him up, for what seemed like half the night. I can still picture him sitting on the side of his bed in his PJ's settling an argument and then just talking two a couple of somewhat drunks from Georgia. Can you imagine, any of his offspring doing that today. Sr loved the fans and understood they were the backbone of NASCAR.
I bet the next morning he got an unlisted unpublished phone number.:bounce:
 
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