Wild Edibles

Thread starter #1

RBM

Senior Member
It was suggested that wild edibles be a sticky thread so here it is. Like Ben and many of us have said on here, "Always be sure of your ability to identify the plants correctly or else get help from someone you really trust. Be careful and enjoy! " I would add that your local county extension office, expert, college, or university would be good sources to get a plant's correct identity. Just take a sample in.

A good reference site is Deane Jordan's Eat the Weeds. Use the search feature on the site. But still take a sample in or get positive ID before making use of a plant.

http://www.eattheweeds.com/
 
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slow motion

Senior Member
Cool link. Very interesting info about ragweed. Gonna try some of the grain.
 
This subject is what lured me into the forum several years ago. Thanks for starting something up. If things really ever go south then this will be the way to go. All the meat will be gone in a year but plants do survive. Can't wait for the input from some of the folks that do this with regularity! Thanks again! Y'all made my year!!
 
Thread starter #6

RBM

Senior Member
This subject is what lured me into the forum several years ago. Thanks for starting something up. If things really ever go south then this will be the way to go. All the meat will be gone in a year but plants do survive. Can't wait for the input from some of the folks that do this with regularity! Thanks again! Y'all made my year!!
I wouldn't be so sure. Both animals and plants can be over harvested. Both are actually needed nutritionally. Agriculture (of domestic animals and crops) is needed for "long" term survival. But wild edibles and wild animals do help and are needed for "short" term survival so please leave something behind and conserve the resources.:)
 

7 point

Senior Member
I have A few to add Blackberry tea is good for soothing an upset stomach you can make grape tea that is good for head ach.
 

HossBog

Senior Member
7, how ye make the grape tea? The wild blue or purple ones that are growing all over? Those we call bullouses, or some such name? Use the leaves?
 
I am new to foraging. actually im completely clueless to it, but I want to know more about it. With foraging for spruce gum would this not taste like pure pine sap? or is there ways of cooking it so to speak to prevent spruce gum from tasting like turpentine? I am curious to know before i get out there and start chewing on pine sap. pm me your answers if you like. thanks!
 
Thread starter #10

RBM

Senior Member
I am new to foraging. actually im completely clueless to it, but I want to know more about it. With foraging for spruce gum would this not taste like pure pine sap? or is there ways of cooking it so to speak to prevent spruce gum from tasting like turpentine? I am curious to know before i get out there and start chewing on pine sap. pm me your answers if you like. thanks!
This article says,
The taste is… well… sprucy but it does moderate over time, harsh at first, almost sweet after several hours of chewing.
http://www.eattheweeds.com/a-pitch-for-spruce-gum/
 
Dean Green is a great teacher. I am getting into foraging and herbal medicine. Youtube is a great resouce.


videos must be embedded in accordance to forum rules.
 
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We are using Mullein for tea, and plan to use it more often. I harvested some seed stalks and killed off an area of the yard. When should I sow the seeds and what kind of site prep should I do? Experiences are helpful.

Also found about 15 plants in one spot on the place. What could I do to help them grow?
 
Last year I had a ton of Chanterelles, but I was too chicken to eat any. If anyone near Bogart knows about these mushrooms, I would be glad to share for the experience of knowing I am eating ONLY Chanterelles and not some look alike.
 
mushrooms

Last year I had a ton of Chanterelles, but I was too chicken to eat any. If anyone near Bogart knows about these mushrooms, I would be glad to share for the experience of knowing I am eating ONLY Chanterelles and not some look alike.
You are most likley correct about the chanterelles.last year was a great year for mushrooms.i had 10s of pounds to eat and dry.alot of variety too.oysters, chicken of the woods, hen of the woods, black trumpet, multiple chantrelle varieties.
My advice to you is research the most common species.the chanterelles are fairly common summer mushrooms.yellow to orangee in color, gills not going the stem much past the cap with a distinct odor very similar to apricot.same with the black trumpet other than coloring, which is not really black more dark brown.i could go on for hours even go into taxonomy, but i ramble.a good start is, if allowed, direct you toward paul stammetts and fungiperfecti.com.expect it to be a little hippyish, but the wealth of fungus knowledge is immense.also have a large selection of field guides.
1 just for the southeast.if you like mushrooms that would be invaluable to someone just gettin started.
 
Thanks for the info. My problem is that I am a "Mushroom Coward" and do not trust myself even on the most basic of identifying characteristics. I have great access to old hardwood forest, but need to find someone to come and share the bounty while I get a hands on lesson.
 
Are there any folks on here interested in forming a "Foraging Group" centered around Athens? I have found a website that sponsors this type thing and think it would be fun to form a group to meet periodically to spend time in the field learning about, collecting and enjoying meals including the forage.

Shoot me a PM if you have interest.
 
Thread starter #19

RBM

Senior Member
Florida Foraging 1

Spring is here so I thought I would do some backwoods foraging videos. This is the first one on Saw Palmetto. Links are included in the video description. I will put it up in the forum also.

 
Thread starter #20

RBM

Senior Member
Florida Foraging 2

Another clip. This one is *****lypear Cactus (Opuntia). The camera is a ways off so you might need to turn up the volume. As usual, links are included in the video description. The plant next to the *****lypear is by common names of Florida Lilac or Golden Dewdrop (Duranta erecta). It is also thorny. I know it because it is a common landscaping ornamental plant for gardeners that like to xeriscape. But I see a lot of them just growing out in the wild because they are suppose to be native.



http://okeechobee.ifas.ufl.edu/News columns/Duranta.Golden.Dewdrop.htm
 
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