Ya'll Ready?

This will be on my doorstep Wednesday. I sat out archery season last year and it was the longest 5 weeks of my life!! I was gonna get my compound re-strung, but I got this whole package was on sale and only a few bucks more than getting my near decade old bow re-strung. Yogi and Bambi are in trouble this year!
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I came out of the womb ready! I can't wait for those cool October days once again! Buckman, if I get a call to help drag a bear at 2:00 in the a.m., you can rest assured knowing that I will be knocking on your door at 2:30 a.m. to pick you up since you volun-told me for these duties!!! 😣
As for the snake boots... that's a negative for me. I will not be found climbing hills in those things. I hate them, and they hate my feet. I'll just take my chances, and I'll leave that to y'all!
As for the tree stand discussion...I believe I am changing my mind about them (somewhat!). I absolutely will not carry one any considerable distance. I have owned a couple stands in my life but have almost exclusively been a ground hunter. I've killed a few bucks with a bow and from the ground at 25 yards or less in the past. I generally just HATE hunting from a stand and being confined to one.
I do have some "easy" spots in the mtns that I like to hunt for quick after work hunts. In those places, I think I may be taking in a stand before some of the hunts in case I want to hunt those easy access spots. I've come to realize that hunting exclusively from the ground has cost me a LOT of game over the last many years. I had a bear at 20 yards and a rifle in my hand one hunt last November. I couldn't pull off an ethical shot even at 20 yards with a rifle because of the dense tree saplings and young laurel bushes between us. Had I been in a stand even merely 6' off the ground, I could have smoked that bear. And I was probably hardly over 100 yards from the road. Getting it out would have been easy as pie. Had a similar occurance with a buck on Chattahoochee WMA last December.

I now have 3 climbers, including one MINT CONDITION original Tree Lounge stand that I recently acquired for free. I will be emplacing some of these in my easy spots to hunt out of this fall.
Not long ago, a co-worker of mine was teasing me. He said "you are the only guy I know that says things like "had a bear at 10 yards and a rifle in my hand......couldn't get a shot". All I can do is laugh about it because it is sad, but true. I like to hunt small openings in the midst of the thick....the real thick. I constantly get on the game but can hardly ever seal the deal just because of no shot opportunities. Just a few feet up a tree would make all the difference MUCH of the time.
I think I will employ these stands this fall and just see if my success rate improves. It is so low at the current, all it can do is improve!! Ha! 😂
Depending on stand placement, a few feet up a tree may be worse than sitting on the ground in SOME instances. Ask me how I know...as you know, stand selection is about more than a straight tree. Especially in the mtns where a bear can easily be eye level with you when you’re 25 ft up a tree.
 

Buckman18

Senior Member
This will be on my doorstep Wednesday. I sat out archery season last year and it was the longest 5 weeks of my life!! I was gonna get my compound re-strung, but I got this whole package was on sale and only a few bucks more than getting my near decade old bow re-strung. Yogi and Bambi are in trouble this year!
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I got the exact same crossbow to try this year. I’ve never shot one, slow to switch from a compound. Looking forward to something new.
 
Depending on stand placement, a few feet up a tree may be worse than sitting on the ground in SOME instances. Ask me how I know...as you know, stand selection is about more than a straight tree. Especially in the mtns where a bear can easily be eye level with you when you’re 25 ft up a tree.
I completely understand. If you're hunting a deep gap and you are 20' up a tree, and an animal comes across or down one side of the gap and not in it, you can be dead level with them. When thinking of employing stands, my main reasoning for wanting tonuse one in some situations is just to get above the brush immediately around where I choose to sit. My sit locations are usually good, but there always seems to be some kind of 3'-6' brush between me and the game. If I can just get above the brush in some of those easy spots, I feel like that will give me more clear lanes between me and the game.
Also, a few of the spots I'm thinking about are spots where I have hunted before and where the terrain is not an issue. One is a big, flat bench where a razorback ridge meets a mountainside. The deer always travel across that flat bench. Another is a wide, flat creek bottom leading tona food plot. That is where I got close to the bear last November and couldnt get a shot. The other place is little finger running down from the middle a HUGE gap that is probably 150-200 yards wide. It is so wide and being that I'd be in the middle, any game that cuts through anywhere near me will always be below me.
I don't plan to emplace any stands in any super steep place simply because I am not going to carry a stand there!
 
I got the exact same crossbow to try this year. I’ve never shot one, slow to switch from a compound. Looking forward to something new.
I was gonna get a recurve to save weight climbing those mountains, but my wife was scared to death that I was gonna get eaten by a bear. This is my first crossbow and it just made sense for hunting from the ground or on foot. I sit in a hammock seat so it should make for very easy handling (lighter than my rifle too)
 

Buckman18

Senior Member
I was gonna get a recurve to save weight climbing those mountains, but my wife was scared to death that I was gonna get eaten by a bear. This is my first crossbow and it just made sense for hunting from the ground or on foot. I sit in a hammock seat so it should make for very easy handling (lighter than my rifle too)
Yep. That’s exactly what I had in mind. Killer Kyle got me hooked on the hammock seat a couple years ago, and all of a sudden I find I’m not toting that summit viper all over creation. The crossbow should make the hammock more viable during archery season.
 
I'm curious as to what the rest of you guys pack into the mountains for a day hunt. All of you that have replied on this post, I consider the serious bear/mountain hunters. I've only been after bears for 2 seasons, but I'm more interested in them than deer nowadays. Would you guys be interested in a "Mountain Gear" thread? I'm not a gear snob or anything, but I do use some interesting stuff.
 

Buckman18

Senior Member
I'm curious as to what the rest of you guys pack into the mountains for a day hunt. All of you that have replied on this post, I consider the serious bear/mountain hunters. I've only been after bears for 2 seasons, but I'm more interested in them than deer nowadays. Would you guys be interested in a "Mountain Gear" thread? I'm not a gear snob or anything, but I do use some interesting stuff.
Honestly, less is more. In my backpack I have a couple of knives, a rope, extra orange vest (to cover rack or head) garbage bags/feed sacks for meat, portable phone charger, couple lights, snacks and drinks, folding saw, hammock seat, and most importantly, empty space. I intend on killing when I pack in yonder, and I’m gonna need that space.
 
Honestly, less is more. In my backpack I have a couple of knives, a rope, extra orange vest (to cover rack or head) garbage bags/feed sacks for meat, portable phone charger, couple lights, snacks and drinks, folding saw, hammock seat, and most importantly, empty space. I intend on killing when I pack in yonder, and I’m gonna need that space.
I couldn't agree more about less. I carry a Maxpedition Sling pack (single shoulder to keep my shooting shoulder clear) small first aid kit, a couple knives, multitool, flashlight, headlamp, batteries, compact binos, compass, map, TP(the most important thing), snacks, poncho(doubles as a small shelter), Paracord, my hammock seat. I use one of those roll-up drag sleds, but I found that stashing it on the mountain with rope, a tarp, and a good drag handle was much better than carrying it around. I'm always looking for lighter gear, My pack fully loaded weighed 12 pounds last year
 

FMBear

Senior Member
My pack contains my hunting shirt (as I hike in with a separate shirt on), hat & gloves, my range finder, GPS, a compass, a small bottle of scent a way spray, lighter, bags for quartering game, trot line for tying of game during dressing and quartering, game harness for dragging, an LED flashlight with fresh batteries, band aids, some paper towels, and a 3 blade/foldable knife that has a straight blade, a boning blade with a gut hook, and a small bone saw.
My food and drink is simple each day. 2 cheese sticks and a bag of trail mix, with two-20 ounce bottles of water.
I also carry in a 3-leg chair with a back rest.
I take my time in the mornings going to the spot I've chosen for the day. Depending on the ascent of the climb, I may take 2 hours for a mile and a half trek in. Normally, I hunt my way in and take about an hour/mile for scent control and the fact that I've been busted by bears during my ascent up the mountains as they're transitioning between the feeding and watering areas in the first hour of daylight more often than I care to admit.
 
I use a climber some- I too use a summit, but an open front job. Only when I have a particular tree already picked out. I aint about to lug that thing up and down the hills for fun.
 
I'll add benadryl to the standard gear of knives, cordage, snacks, etc. If you dont carry Benadryl- start. If you are bitten by a snake, stung up or bitten by some yellow jackets or such it might save your life! Ive gotten mixed up with YJs in some STEEP places. Most ive ever been stung is 12 times or so.. Im not allergic but if you get popped 20 or 30 times, who knows..
 

Buckman18

Senior Member
I'll add benadryl to the standard gear of knives, cordage, snacks, etc. If you dont carry Benadryl- start. If you are bitten by a snake, stung up or bitten by some yellow jackets or such it might save your life! Ive gotten mixed up with YJs in some STEEP places. Most ive ever been stung is 12 times or so.. Im not allergic but if you get popped 20 or 30 times, who knows..
Great point about Benadryl. I’m gonna start keeping some in my pack.
 
I'll add benadryl to the standard gear of knives, cordage, snacks, etc. If you dont carry Benadryl- start. If you are bitten by a snake, stung up or bitten by some yellow jackets or such it might save your life! Ive gotten mixed up with YJs in some STEEP places. Most ive ever been stung is 12 times or so.. Im not allergic but if you get popped 20 or 30 times, who knows..
A couple years ago, buckman and I did a scouting death march. Up, over, and through two mountains and gaps, and then side-hilled another mountain, then down to another gap, and then hiked back to the truck. On the final descent to the road, I was walking in the lead, and sicked a bunch of yellow jackets on Buckman. We were plowing through chest high blueberries. I guess I stirred them up, but since he was behind me, he became their victim. He got lit up pretty good. I'll punctuate that by saying that he moves pretty fast for a man his size! 😂
Before that, JBoggs and I were out scouting one day in June. He walked in front of me because he had snake boots and I didn't. He joked about me making him walk in front and him being the likely one to find a rattler. I said "no, the real danger here is bees. You're walking in front, so you'll kick them up, and I'll be the one that gets stung". Literally not a half hour later and out of nowhere, a yellow jacket stung me on the corner of my left eye where my eyelids meet. About 5mm from my eyeball. I said "Bees...RUN!!" then got stung on my left elbow. We were way off the grid up in no-mans land, and I told JB that we needed to leave promptly and make our way to the vehicle. He asked if I was allergic. I said "no, but I have never been stung on the face before. I don't know how I am going to react". We bailed out of there with the quickness, and I looked like Mike Tyson landed a right hook on my face for a week.

I am paranoid about stings because as we age, our bodies change. I have witnessed it first hand. About 5 years ago I was camping with a friend and his family at a private property on Lake Lanier up Wahoo Creek. His grandpa who was about 65 years old at the time got stung on the back of the neck. He has never been allergic in his 65 years of life. NEVER. It was just a small sting. No big deal. A few minutes later, I watched him go into hypovalactic shock and collapse. Holding his chest. Wheezing and gasping for air. My buddy raced him to the ER in Gainesville with two Hall Co. Sherriff's deputies trailing him for speeding. They ended up helping him drag his grandad into the ER. Gramps was in the hospital for eleven days after that episode. Had been stung all throughout his life with no reaction whatsoever, but suddenly, he was allergic that night. Only the Lord above knows why.
That episode changed my perspective off bee stings. Just because you werent allergic to bees last year doesn't mean you won't be this year. Our bodies change as we age. A few benadryl tablets are cheap (and lightweight) insurance.
I just wanted to share that with y'all to plant a seed in your brain!
 

Buckman18

Senior Member
A couple years ago, buckman and I did a scouting death march. Up, over, and through two mountains and gaps, and then side-hilled another mountain, then down to another gap, and then hiked back to the truck. On the final descent to the road, I was walking in the lead, and sicked a bunch of yellow jackets on Buckman. We were plowing through chest high blueberries. I guess I stirred them up, but since he was behind me, he became their victim. He got lit up pretty good. I'll punctuate that by saying that he moves pretty fast for a man his size! 😂
With friends who sic bees on you then eloquently call you a tub of goo of the WWW, who needs enemies? ;)
 
I was scoutin buck beds before bow season last year when something nailed me on the rear end thru a pair of carhartts. I ran expecting more sudden pains to follow. To my surprise I never saw what hit me. Right buttock swelled up pretty bad. I figure it was a big hornet or something. I've also sat dangerously close to some hornets nest in the dark before I realized it. May pack some of that benydrll this year.
 
My Crossbow came today! Now I'm really itchin for September!! Here's something else I've been working in for quite awhile. It took me a year to put together these 2 suits of 20 year discontinued camo from my teenage days. Left is Advantage Timber, Right is Trebark Bigwoods. I had to constantly search eBay to find excellent quality and the right sizes. Both sets are double knee pants for going through them hills and hollers. All good name brands and most had the tags or we're maybe worn once. I'm spending the whole season hunting the mountains as I'm out of private land to hunt. Let's keep this thread going!! View attachment 968985 View attachment 968986
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I hunt swamps down here mostly but pack for all day hunts. When I head to the mountains this year I doubt Ill pack much different. I carry a fairly large pack with plastic bags for boning out my critter. I dont drag anything no matter how close to the road I am. I carry a pillow case in case I have more than my pack can hold in meat...I killed three pigs at one time last year and two years before I killed a doe and 2 pigs in one morning. I was lucky my Buddy Chris Spikes was hunting with me on that hunt and made it easier.Both hunts were over a mile from the road. You can put what your pack wont hold in the pillow case and tie it to the top of the pack.
I carry some rope,2 knives a file for sharpening broadheads. I carry 3 quality flash lights as well as a head lamp. Camera. Gps, Water,snack and a small bottle with an assortment of medicine. Tylenol,Benadryl and asprin. Down here you wont leave the truck without a thermacel. I also carry a very small bottle of bug juice. I never leave the truck without a compass around my neck. Dont forget some stricking paper and a lighter!
I hunted last year a lot with a 8 lb loc-on and 10 bolts with a woodpecker drill. Im gonna use 4 lone wolf sticks this year . Of course a safety belt as well.
I have hunted with tradbows for near 40 years and dont expect to change. I put a small rubber tip on the bottom limb of my longbow for protection and it doubles as a walking stick,depth finder on small creeks and good for flipping snakes off the trail. Make no mistake it is a killer.
AS far as camo...whatever is on sale works and a good woodsy color plaid works great in cooler weather. I usually use the lite weight Lacrosse alpha rubber boots or if im planing on covering a lot of ground in warm weather snake boots.
Through the years I have found a little more weight in the pack can make for a much more enjoyable hunt. Dont skimp on stuff you may need but dont over weigh yourself with gadgets and crap you dont need.
One thing I have learned is that if you find yourself in a hurry...you have planned wrong. Being in a hurry will cause you to get hurt or make mistakes . Be confident in your navigation skills and your abillity to get around in the dark. I once dropped the only flashlight I had on me from the stand and busted it. I was a mile in the swamp in the dark with no light. Loonnggg trip back out. I used my lighter and compass for direction and "feel" for the footwork..it was painful..lol
 
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I hunt swamps down here mostly but pack for all day hunts. When I head to the mountains this year I doubt Ill pack much different. I carry a fairly large pack with plastic bags for boning out my critter. I dont drag anything no matter how close to the road I am. I carry a pillow case in case I have more than my pack can hold in meat...I killed three pigs at one time last year and two years before I killed a doe and 2 pigs in one morning. I was lucky my Buddy Chris Spikes was hunting with me on that hunt and made it easier.Both hunts were over a mile from the road. You can put what your pack wont hold in the pillow case and tie it to the top of the pack.
I carry some rope,2 knives a file for sharpening broadheads. I carry 3 quality flash lights as well as a head lamp. Camera. Gps, Water,snack and a small bottle with an assortment of medicine. Tylenol,Benadryl and asprin. Down here you wont leave the truck without a thermacel. I also carry a very small bottle of bug juice. I never leave the truck without a compass around my neck. Dont forget some stricking paper and a lighter!
I hunted last year a lot with a 8 lb loc-on and 10 bolts with a woodpecker drill. Im gonna use 4 lone wolf sticks this year . Of course a safety belt as well.
I have hunted with tradbows for near 40 years and dont expect to change. I put a small rubber tip on the bottom limb of my longbow for protection and it doubles as a walking stick,depth finder on small creeks and good for flipping snakes off the trail. Make no mistake it is a killer.
AS far as camo...whatever is on sale works and a good woodsy color plaid works great in cooler weather. I usually use the lite weight Lacrosse alpha rubber boots or if im planing on covering a lot of ground in warm weather snake boots.
Through the years I have found a little more weight in the pack can make for a much more enjoyable hunt. Dont skimp on stuff you may need but dont over weigh yourself with gadgets and crap you dont need.
One thing I have learned is that if you find yourself in a hurry...you have planned wrong. Being in a hurry will cause you to get hurt or make mistakes . Be confident in your navigation skills and your abillity to get around in the dark. I once dropped the only flashlight I had on me from the stand and busted it. I was a mile in the swamp in the dark with no light. Loonnggg trip back out. I used my lighter and compass for direction and "feel" for the footwork..it was painful..lol
Great post. My first trip down to the swamp I wore my regular mountain boots. Bad mistake! My next trip down I was sportin a pair of lacrosse rubber boots. Much better. However, em rubber boots are useless in these hills. Worse than useless. When ye come up bring a pair of supportive, lug soled boots. Your feet & ankles will thank you.
 
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