Your thoughts on too many does?

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I hear all the big hunting shows and YouTube big names saying too many does is a bad thing. In the real world do yall feel the same way? Our doe population has really blown up in the past few years and I believe it has affected our rut in a negative way, or could it just be coincidence with bad timing weather heat food sources idk. Just seems like all I see anymore are does. I know Georgia shoots alot of does I think yalls limits are 2 bucks and 10 or 12 does? Do yall feel like this is beneficial to better hunting far as seeing more bucks? I hunt in south Carolina and they have changed the rules up there in the last few years, but they place is ate up with does. Anyways I'm fixing to start shooting more does and I hope it has a positive affect on our herd and we start seeing more mature bucks hanging around like we use too
 
Folks I know in north central Illinois will tell you that there are way too many does and have been for decades. But those folks are farmers and are just ticked off because the deer herds eat so much of their crops. (and truthfully, I was seeing actual herds of more than 100 deer - almost all does - ravaging crops around 2003 thru 2007 - folks tell me it is still happening)

What I don't know is whether overpopulation - notably concentrations of does in a limited range - is connected with CWD.
 
In my experience, doe groups will typically seek out and bed around and in close proximity to preferred food sources. The bucks, and especially mature bucks, will no bed in or around the doe group. With the does, as the food availability changes, the group will typically move. So you can have tons of does on a soybean field early season, then they move to the neighbors acorn ridge in November, and then on a wheat field down the road a ways in December and January. In each case they will typically bed near the food if at all possible. Part of this explains why some people see a bunch of deer in one part of the season and then very few later on. As the food changes, the deer move.

On properties that have constant food sources, you can create a doe vacuum almost where as soon as you kill some or a group off, another one or another group move into the preferred area with lots of food. If you have a property with food everywhere, even if it is a large property, as the doe population grows they take up more and more property, and push the bucks out to more remote areas, or in a lot of cases off of the property. To much food can actual be a bad thing if you are after bucks, because the does move in and push them out.

In my experience, killing does doesn't alway help, because if it is a preferred area, more just move in. What you need are sections of the property that are preferential to bucks away from the food sources, and areas around the food source for does. You want to have the best area for does, but also sections that are the best areas for bucks. They aren't the same, even though people often treat them as such. If you get to that point, you will find that you have a section(s) of the property on which it seems like there are always plenty of deer, but very few bucks, and other areas of the property where they mature bucks always seem to hang out. If not over pressured and hunted properly, those areas will typically replenish with more of the same.
 
It can be if the goal is producing a lot of giant bucks. But the big name guys are putting out enough food to create a population explosion, so they have to shoot a lot of does to keep the numbers in check. They also have a pretty good idea of their local population so they don't overdo it.
 
Yes...
Let’s put it in a Redneck bar scenario. You go to a bar that has 20 guys and 5 girls...every guy is trying to win one of those girls affection. Fights break out, chaos ensues, girl goes home with the baddest dudes there.
You go to a bar and there 5 guys and 20 girls. Do you really have to do anything to get their attention? They’re all right there. You just sit in your little corner and make out at will.

Guess it all boils down to what you want. If you want the bucks roaming looking for does then yeah to many and that’s not going to happen. He sits in his little hideout and waits for the right one to come along and he’s set. Gets done with her and no worries another will come by.
If there’s only so many does to breed then he better get busy because his goal is to procreate with as many that are available.

I also look at it like this...less does equals more food!
 
I have a new property that is all does and fawns. A lot of them. Way more than you'd expect to see, all day, whether it be 3 pm, noon or 3 am or midnight. 2 months now and only two buck photos of some young ones crusing by recently. First time experiencing this scenario so I'm curious to see how it all plays out. Right now I think my best bet is to let it simmer until early November. I'm more of a meat Hunter than a trophy Hunter so I know going into this property I can fill a freezer even if I'm selective. Gonna wait it out and see how it pans out.

One thing I have noticed is it seems the fawns are all different sizes and age groups. Some are tiny with slick shiny spotted costs and some look like they're losing their spots and noticably larger. Makes me think they are bred early and all through season to late season, supporting the theory that their is no real competition and it might be a long drawn out slow rut phase and no real intense action with competition. Either way I'm excited to be able to see a lot of deer again. I'd rather see does every sit than see one half decent buck after a week of hard grueling hunting like my other spot I have.
 
Neighbors around my 2 GA farms absolutely hammer the does and believe that is proper management. The result i have seen since the doe killing craze is less deer sightings in general. Still some good bucks to be had but nothing like the days before the doe killing/qdma craze got ingrained in everyone’s head. My SC farm is just the opposite. Surrounding plantations don’t hammer the does at all...and I see more bucks with the opportunity to kill quality bucks at any given time. I’m surrounded by big properties that are pretty much hunted by family and it’s just a different philosophy. One I’ve come to prefer. Reminds me of the way GA hunting was when I was in my teens.
 
I think there’s a fine line between hammering the does and keeping the numbers in check.
Sitting in a stand and seeing 30 deer and 27 are does, yearlings, fawns, and only 3 scrub bucks running around with their tongues hanging out gets old over time.
Shooting enough does to where you see 20 deer total and half are does and the other half bucks with potential shooters in the mix keeps you awake at night wondering what might show up next.
We are going to take several does this year and see what happens.
Our plantations over here really hammer the does based on numbers. They set a certain number for each area and will shoot all the way to that last day to meet those numbers if they have to. They also kill 150-160”+ deer every year as well.
 

kmckinnie

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I think there’s a fine line between hammering the does and keeping the numbers in check.
Sitting in a stand and seeing 30 deer and 27 are does, yearlings, fawns, and only 3 scrub bucks running around with their tongues hanging out gets old over time.
Shooting enough does to where you see 20 deer total and half are does and the other half bucks with potential shooters in the mix keeps you awake at night wondering what might show up next.
We are going to take several does this year and see what happens.
Our plantations over here really hammer the does based on numbers. They set a certain number for each area and will shoot all the way to that last day to meet those numbers if they have to. They also kill 150-160”+ deer every year as well.
Whereu are y’all really have more than enough food. I would think to many deer would hurt crop farmers. I’m sure some of the management there is for both. Balanced heard with quality in mind.
 
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