2nd Year Food Plots in Wilkes County

Thread starter #1
So --

We planted several plots that were log decks last year and they were quite a success. Given that we didn't do much in the way of prep I was quite pleased. We planted a 10-way mix, after amending the soil with lime and turning the soil twice and fertilizing.

Now, we have to decide what to do next...first I am going to get soil samples this year. Then what?

The 10-way mix had some clover, but they will need to be replanted. I'd like to put some chufa in somewhere, and maybe one plot in summer beans.

What do you guys do in terms of mowing, tilling, fertilizer, etc. between now and an October planting? Do we need to turn again before liming?

You can see the plots in the threads here: https://forum.gon.com/threads/first-year-food-plots.980542/
 

Evergreen

ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ
If you just have to have something thru the summer, maybe try some forage beans, I wouldn't waste the money on eagle beans if it is very small area. They are going to get eaten.

I have done this with decent success also, 2-3 weeks before the bow opener, plant way above the seeding rate of conventional beans (if you can find them cheap) last year I had a 140000 recommended seed count per acre and put a shade over 900000 seeds in 1.5 acres, way to heavy, I know, but given germ rates, a week for them to emerge, that's a lot of bites for them to ruin it all before the bow opener in less than 2 weeks, at that point your not looking for a "crop" but enough attraction (hard to beat tender bean seedlings) for the first few weeks of bow season.
 

Canuck5

Senior Member
You did good with your plots, especially having been loading decks last year! I'd take Triple C's advice in post #3 and just let them go right now, except for any sicklepod. Just close your eyes and let all those roots break up the hardpan and do their job. That will be a great thing for years to come. Get your soil test done and get ready to amend your soil, before you burn it down with glyphosate.

And you can take Evergreen's advice in post #7, if you want something just before bow season, after you've spread your lime and got it worked into the ground. Then get ready to plan and plant your fall plots.
 

Canuck5

Senior Member
So, let everything go ...... get your soil test taken .... broadcast your lime in late August ... burndown with glyphosate ... work up your soil and plant your beans (if wanted) for bow opener ..... then start deciding what you want to plant for fall, in early October.
 
Thread starter #17
@Triple C @Canuck5 Do we need to turn before liming? Or just lime as is? The plots are very soft. With all of the rain, and the turning we did last year, a deer sinks in an inch into the soil right now. And fertilize anytime before planting or at seeding, or both? Plan to get soil sample in March or so taken...
 
Thread starter #18
You did good with your plots, especially having been loading decks last year! I'd take Triple C's advice in post #3 and just let them go right now, except for any sicklepod. Just close your eyes and let all those roots break up the hardpan and do their job. That will be a great thing for years to come. Get your soil test done and get ready to amend your soil, before you burn it down with glyphosate.

And you can take Evergreen's advice in post #7, if you want something just before bow season, after you've spread your lime and got it worked into the ground. Then get ready to plan and plant your fall plots.
Thank you it is fun learning how to do this! Couldn't have done it without GON!
 

Canuck5

Senior Member
Burn down with glyphosate in mid August, then 2-3 weeks later spread lime and work it into the top 4-6". Spread fertilizer when you are ready to plant.
 

Canuck5

Senior Member
Lime takes 6 months to really work and if this wasn't a loading deck, I'd say put your lime out ASAP and work it into the soil, but I think with the hardpan 6" -10" -14" down, I'd let what's growing there help break it it. Breaking up the hardpan will allow moisture to go deeper into your soil and then it will act like a reservoir, to hold moisture for dryer times. As long as you don't compact the soil, it will be there for your plants.
 
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