A few more off the grinder

Thread starter #1

godogs57

Senior Member
Here are four recent blades that were mailed out this month. Hope you enjoy looking. Gotta get back to the shop...thanks for looking.

This is a forged 01 carbon steel blade with stabilized spalted silver maple handles from the Netherlands. Its one of my EDC (every day carry)designs. Love the carbon steel...she sharpened up quickly and with no issues.
GON EDC spalted.jpg

This is another Canadian Skinner blade headed out. CPM154 stainless with a stabilized burl walnut handle. Sharp as always. Getting a ton of positive feedback on this timeless design!
GON Canadian Skinner.jpg

I seem to be getting a good number of orders for this blade and steel combination. Desert ironwood handles and damascus steel....I think it "clicks".
GON T&B.jpg

Finally, this blade is a favorite of mine...it is a good working knife design...fits your hand well. CPM154 stainless and exhibition grade desert ironwood. Sorry for the quality of the photo as the blade was over exposed in the pic.

GON Dan's knife.jpg
 
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Redbow

Senior Member
Fine work I like them all too...My favorite is the damascus steel...
 

Head East

Senior Member
Man those are sweet. I do like the spalted silver maple handle. And yes, the ironwood and damascus does “click”. Lol.

Would you explain the term...stabilized?

Nicely done!
 
Mighty fine! Love that ironwood!
 
Thread starter #8

godogs57

Senior Member
Man those are sweet. I do like the spalted silver maple handle. And yes, the ironwood and damascus does “click”. Lol.

Would you explain the term...stabilized?

Nicely done!
Sure, be glad to. The wood is stabilized by immersing it in an acrylic resin, ensuring each cell is infused with the resin. This is usually done by vacuum...pulling the air out of the individual cells and replacing it with resin over a set period of time. The resin infused wood is then heated to a specific temperature to harden it. The wood will not rot at that point and shrinking/swelling is reduced to almost nil. The resin can be clear or colored depending on what you want.
Additionally, many woods do not need stabilizing, mainly woods that are considered “oily”. For example, desert ironwood, snake wood, cocobolo are oily woods...no need to stabilize or even spray a finish on them...just sand down and polish. The desert ironwood in my pic was hand sanded down to 2500 grit and then polished with wax.
 

Head East

Senior Member
Interesting! Would the very closely grained woods need a longer period in the vacuum process, or does it matter? Further, are there specific resins for specific woods?

What is your favorite wood to use as handles? Aesthetically, i seem yo favor the look of the lighter wood with darker “veins”, if thats the correct terminology.

Again, really nice workmanship.
 

pacecars

Senior Member
The ironwood handled knife arrived today and as great as it looks in the picture it pales In comparison to the way it looks in person. It is stunning. Thanks Hank! Outstanding work
 
Thread starter #12

godogs57

Senior Member
Interesting! Would the very closely grained woods need a longer period in the vacuum process, or does it matter? Further, are there specific resins for specific woods?

What is your favorite wood to use as handles? Aesthetically, i seem yo favor the look of the lighter wood with darker “veins”, if thats the correct terminology.

Again, really nice workmanship.
There are hundreds of resins out there that can be used. The “serious” wood stabilization folks out there are usually hesitant to reveal which one they use. Sort of like asking Coke for their formula. The gentleman I've used for years has spent over twenty years perfecting his particular resin recipe and refuses to divulge where he gets it from...and we’re friends! Your major stabilizers will have different resins for different woods or situations. They also have better equipment than the backyard, or hobby, wood stabilizer. You have to have the necessary equipment that can create a pretty significant vacuum, which ensures 100% of the cells, or pores, are filled with resin. The average joe generally does not, or can not, obtain that type of equipment that the big boys use.

My first choice in handle material is highly figured, light colored, desert ironwood, or highly figured stabilized walnut. Another wood, kind of new on the scene, is gidgee and the figured stuff will knock your socks off...it’s terrific. I also love snake wood. Gorgeous stuff, and said to be the rarest wood in the world.
 

Head East

Senior Member
Thanks for the insight. im not even an average joe, No worries on me stealing the secret formula.

All i know is you do really nice work. Been showin SBM all the nice work you do... she hasnt caught the drift yet. 😬.
 
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