Are Bent Tree's Protected?

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Are Bent Tree's Protected???

Anyone know if Bent Tree's are protected in Georgia? I know of one that is possibly in EXTREME DANGER in Bartow County. I want to protect this tree but not sure if its possible. ANY ADVISE IS APPRECIATED! Pink arrow is approximate lication and the pic I took last week.
 

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Flash

Senior Member
Looks like it has been protected, it's under the power line and has been trimmed MANY times to keep it out of it. not trying to be smart or nothing, why would a bent tree be protected over another??
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Why would a bent tree be any more protected than any other one? I could probably show you 25 in a morning in any average patch of woods. BTW the whole "Indian Trail Trees" thing is a myth.
 

Jeff C.

Chief Grass Master🌾
Are Bent Tree's Protected???

Anyone know if Bent Tree's are protected in Georgia? I know of one that is possibly in EXTREME DANGER in Bartow County. I want to protect this tree but not sure if its possible. ANY ADVISE IS APPRECIATED! Pink arrow is approximate lication and the pic I took last week.

Sorry, but it was in EXTREME DANGER when it grew up into the Power lines.
 
Why would a bent tree be any more protected than any other one? I could probably show you 25 in a morning in any average patch of woods. BTW the whole "Indian Trail Trees" thing is a myth.
I have always laughed at people that say Indians did this.
I’m like, are they still doing it, cause I see little trees bent all the time. When another tree falls on them it happens. why would Indians bend over a tree as a marker? there has literally been books written and documentary’s made on this myth.
People are so stupid!
 

JustUs4All

Slow Mod
Staff member
Bent trees are not protected in GA unless they happen to be in an area where all trees are protected for some reason.
 
There's a few bent trees around the area. Only white oaks and they all look the same. The ones I've seen are all facing Sautee which is supposed to be Indian burial grounds. Also they are around 250 year old range when compared to other big whites that we've cut in the area. Most all others are definitely from trees falling on and damaging a young tree
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
I have a hard time believing that Indians didn’t know their way around woods and needed to bend over a sapling to help out a future Indian 100 years later find the way to something.
They had well defined trails in a vast network. Most of our highway system now follows Indian trails.
 

Flash

Senior Member
Why would a bent tree be any more protected than any other one? I could probably show you 25 in a morning in any average patch of woods. BTW the whole "Indian Trail Trees" thing is a myth.
Don't remember where I was at the time, might have been that place with a few water falls near/at Bryson City. Anyway, seems like it was a ranger type that told that. First time I had ever heard it.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Don't remember where I was at the time, might have been that place with a few water falls near/at Bryson City. Anyway, seems like it was a ranger type that told that. First time I had ever heard it.
It's misinformation. You need to be forced to take a vaccine, and Indians bent trees over to mark their trail that they all knew about.
 
Ones I've seen that are bent are in well know Indian camps. A quick walk around and can find tons of worked pieces of quarts. Few others will have broke pottery prices. Juts noting what a local with part Cherokee pointed out to me
 

RoosterTodd

Sinister Operative
In most of Georgia, a tree would have to be over 200 years old for it to be an "Indian tree". 200 year old trees are fairly rare. I know folks want to hold on to the past and the idea of a bent tree marking an old indian trail is a romantic idea, it's just simply not true. Indians didn't have to bend trees to know where they were going.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
It`s just a fallacy the same as Indian Princesses, dropping water on a hot piece of chert with a feather to flake arrowheads, and hidden gold mines.
Yep.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Ones I've seen that are bent are in well know Indian camps. A quick walk around and can find tons of worked pieces of quarts. Few others will have broke pottery prices. Juts noting what a local with part Cherokee pointed out to me
I can find plenty of them near and not near well known Indian camps. Pretty much everywhere people live now was an Indian camp. I can find worked pieces of quartz in every single plowed field. Indians didn’t bend trees to mark trails
 
I can find plenty of them near and not near well known Indian camps. Pretty much everywhere people live now was an Indian camp. I can find worked pieces of quartz in every single plowed field. Indians didn’t bend trees to mark trails
i use to think the same thing until this guy made some good points that his kin folks that lived for 100s of years before we did told him what he told me. I guess since me of you didnt live here when they did and how they did will never really know!
 
If a tree added 3/16th of an inch in diameter each year, to be an indian tree, it would have to be somewhere around 48 inches in diameter. I don't run across to many 4 ft diameter trees in the woods, and I can assure you that I have never seen a 48 inch bent tree in the woods
 
Easy to prove/disprove get a canteen of water and start following "bent trees". You'll either get lost way out in the woods or wind up standing in the middle of Peachtree. Having spent nearly 90% of my time in the woods (not just hunting), I totally agree with Nic, Hillbilly, & Pappy - bogus info from folks that don't see the true drama that constantly occurs in the enviroment around them.
 
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