Bear tracks

I think the rule of thumb is the width of the front paw plus an inch (roughly) will give you the length (in feet) of the bear. So a 5” track would be a 6 foot bear, which doesn’t give weight obviously, but weight varies greatly based on time of year and diet, but a South Georgia bear doesn’t change as much as a mountain bear or a hibernating Bear.
 
Thread starter #11

1982ace

Senior Member
A lot of coyote tracks everywhere. This is in the middle of a 400 acre ag field.the bear walked across the field into a swamp.
 
I think that this thread is very interesting. I would bet that probably 95 % of the members here that view this thread don't have a clue as to how you know that a bear, yote, dog, bobcat, rabbit, raccoon, turkey, etc was actually traveling east, west, north or south just from this photo. I am really glad that there are others of you that really do take the time to understand what a photo can really reveal.

Thankfully, my father taught me to try and see every small detail of what you are really looking at whether it is live or in a photo etc. My father was the "original" Eagle Eye as his doctors told him that they believed that he could see "a chigger on the moon" because of his keen eye-sight (even though he hated carrots). :rofl:

ps: Can you imagine when the next 100 people read this thread....there will be around 95 of them scratching their heads wondering just how did all of you above really know all of these details !!!!
 
Hard to say without a hand, dollar bill, boot or ball cap next to em to judge by. The sandy soil says it's south ga, it looks to be heading east and ems fairly new lookin tractor tars tho😂
That new looking tractor tire was the very first thing that I thought about when I saw the photo also. Most people just don't realize that the sun can tell the entire story of this photo as such even though the sun is not even shown in the photo.
 
That's a pretty good one. I'm not one that claims to know how much one weighs by the size of its foot, but it ain't no baby.
That's a pretty good one. I'm not one that claims to know how much one weighs by the size of its foot, but it ain't no baby.
I don't believe there's an exact science estimating from a tract but I'd say the tract I found falls in the 3 to 400 pound range. The tract was almost 7 inches wide
 
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