Beginner Recurve

Thread starter #1
Good morning guys, I have a hankering to get a recurve and start trying to play around with it. I have been bow only with my compound for awhile now, and would love to find a new challenge. Any advice for an entry level bow that is pretty cheap? $150 or less would be great. I looked at the Samich Sage, but started reading reviews about limbs splitting with very little use on them. Also, what draw weight should I be looking at that's light enough to learn on, but enough to still get the job done on pigs and deer? If any of this info is necessary, Im about 5' 11" 190 pounds, and pull 65 pounds at 29" draw with my compound. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

hambone76

Senior Member
I’d try to find the opportunity to shoot a few different bows and see what appeals to you. A takedown type bow would allow you the flexibility to change limbs and tailor your setup to what suits your needs or to increase weight as you progress.
I would not start out being over-bowed, something in the 40-45# range would be a good starting point and could efficiently take deer sized game if you do your part.
If 45# is too much, drop down in weight until you find something manageable.
Starting out with too much weight will only be counter-productive.
Work on form and consistency first, then work your way up in draw weight as you progress.
 
Start light.
Work up, like if you were weightlifting. You wouldn't walk into the gym and try to squat 500. It takes a few years to get to 500 so remember that.
I was stupid and it set me back.
I like my sage. It shoots well
amazon sells decent strings, arrows, and replaceable -higher or lower poundage - limbs for it.
I think that stuff is sold through SAS - southwest Archery supply
 

hambone76

Senior Member
Start light.
Work up, like if you were weightlifting. You wouldn't walk into the gym and try to squat 500. It takes a few years to get to 500 so remember that.
I was stupid and it set me back.
I like my sage. It shoots well
amazon sells decent strings, arrows, and replaceable -higher or lower poundage - limbs for it.
I think that stuff is sold through SAS - southwest Archery supply
I have a set of Sage limbs mounted on a Bear Whitetail II riser. I like them also.
 
Good morning guys, I have a hankering to get a recurve and start trying to play around with it. I have been bow only with my compound for awhile now, and would love to find a new challenge. Any advice for an entry level bow that is pretty cheap? $150 or less would be great. I looked at the Samich Sage, but started reading reviews about limbs splitting with very little use on them. Also, what draw weight should I be looking at that's light enough to learn on, but enough to still get the job done on pigs and deer? If any of this info is necessary, Im about 5' 11" 190 pounds, and pull 65 pounds at 29" draw with my compound. Any help is greatly appreciated.
You need to make a Trip to Ellaville not this Saturday but next Saturday to SGTP shoot and you can try out several bows and get a better understanding of what fits you best. The Trad Family is always willing to help someone get started and addicted to this madness.
 
All good advice. Im still a newbie myself. I have a Sage, with 40 and 50# limbs. 40#s are my practice bow. Since i got it, my shooting has greatly improved! Form is the most important thing. With a heavy bow, i got very frustrated and put it down a few years ago. I have upgraded to a 47# Timberhawk for hunting this year. Still practice most days with my Sage and just work on form. Go to local shoots and check out youtube. Some really good information on there, form, weight, tuning... Take a little from each place and find what works. If you can find an experienced shooter that can help, your learning curve will be much quicker!
 

hambone76

Senior Member
I picked up a 45# Bear 76’er takedown off of eBay that shoots like a laser. I paid $100 for it with a new string. I put some beaver ball string silencers on the string and it’s pretty much at a whisper now and has near-zero vibration. That just goes to show that a beginner level bow can do just fine with a properly spined arrow and proper tune. I’m shooting some old GT Traditional, footed carbon arrows with 275gr up front.
I have designated it as my bow for form work and as an introductory bow for anybody who wants to shoot one for the first time. The camera angle makes my nock look way high for some reason, please disregard the way it looks. OP, if you are ever up this way and want to shoot, send me a PM. I have 4 or 5 different bows, ranging from 45-60# that you’re welcome to try out.
B7F7168A-4352-459A-8390-780C95386B6D.png
 
Last edited:
Like posted above go to a shoot and try as many as you can!!! There is really no one size fits all bow!! Find one you like and search for a used one (Big Jim normally has a bunch). Have fun and enjoy it!!!! Don't get caught up in the you have to shoot my way or your doing it wrong crowd, learn good form and have a blast. Shoot shoot shoot but don't over do it, don't shoot when you are tired and remember have fun!!!!!
 
Thread starter #11
Thanks for all the advice guys. Im going to keep my eyes peeled and see what I can find. Hopefully after shooting a few first!

Not to get too far off topic, but I have a spine question about the arrows used for traditional archery. It seems like spine is significantly weaker on traditional arrows. Is that due to less efficient bows? Lower draw weight? Is there a chart specifically for spine in traditional arrows?
 
If your wife or kin likes to hit the yard sales...that's a great place to find them. Often $5-$10 bucks. Usually you need a string but their cheap. Just have them give you a call when they find one. I've seen several over the years, you wont find a Black Widow, but I've seen tons of Ben Pearson, Bear and some no names. My son won the West Virginia traditional shoot ( kids division) several years ago with old Damon Howatt I bought like that.
 

Dennis

Senior Member
Thanks for all the advice guys. Im going to keep my eyes peeled and see what I can find. Hopefully after shooting a few first!

Not to get too far off topic, but I have a spine question about the arrows used for traditional archery. It seems like spine is significantly weaker on traditional arrows. Is that due to less efficient bows? Lower draw weight? Is there a chart specifically for spine in traditional arrows?
It's because most trad bows riser is not to to center it can require a weaker spined arrow. At the 3 rivers site there is a spine calculator that will get you in the ballpark.
But nothing will cut your learning curve faster that getting with a experienced trad shooter to teach you and help you tune the arrows to your bow and you.
 

hambone76

Senior Member
If your wife or kin likes to hit the yard sales...that's a great place to find them. Often $5-$10 bucks. Usually you need a string but their cheap. Just have them give you a call when they find one. I've seen several over the years, you wont find a Black Widow, but I've seen tons of Ben Pearson, Bear and some no names. My son won the West Virginia traditional shoot ( kids division) several years ago with old Damon Howatt I bought like that.
^^^^This^^^^
Goodwill, believe it or not, can be a good place to look as well. My buddy found a Damon Howatt there for $10!
I also like to check pawn shops for hunting gear. I’ve seen a few recurves at pawn shops on occasion, you just have to be diligent in searching.
 
Yeah, spine can be a whacky deal if you are used to wheel-bows. I am 52 and shoot a lot of aluminum because that is what we all used back in the 80’s. I find that the old Easton charts are more accurate than the new ones when it comes to getting good data about which arrow to use. The new charts for both carbon and aluminum seem to be biased toward at least one spine too heavy.
 
Top