Best Gunsmith for a Remington 700

Thread starter #1
I have 2 Remington 700's that may have some issues that will require a skilled gunsmith who is a 700 wizzard. They are standard 700's and have bolt issues with the bolt closing with ease on certian ammo. The ammo is within SAMMI specs. I had this problem with reloaded ammo and some factory ammo as well. I have been told it a combination of things from the rifles being shot with hot loads causing carbon and build up in the chamber and in the areas of the bolt. Still not sure why some brass will chamber with no issues and some wont. This problem happens with factory ammo as well as resized brass. I had a very compatant reloader come and check my brass and reloading equipment and it is all good to go so thats not it. Both guns are chambered in 220 Swift
 

jglenn

Senior Member
If you don't have one, get a case gauge for the swift and check your ammo. Spinning a larger brush in your chamber along with some good carbon removing solvent should resolve any chamber issue with carbon.. find a Smith that has go/ no go gauges for the swift. He can make sure you proper headspace
 

Jester896

Senior Clown
His loads are not stretching his brass to SAAMI Max. There are no reasons to push his shoulders back or the real need for a case gauge at this point until he starts to do that. He does have items that he can use to determine if that is happening without a case gauge.

I went over with him how it could be easy to size his brass longer than when it came from his chamber and how to use the equipment he has to determine if that is what he was doing by not letting the datum area for the die contact the datum area of the case. We also went over just how far his equipment will under size his brass.

He has 2 Remington rifles he picked up that appear to me to have never been cleaned. I unstuck the ejector on one of them for him and removed the brass chips from the hole. The face of the bolt looks like it has more than .005 of hammered brass on the bolt face. That was caused by the same thing that got the chips in the ejector hole...no telling how long the ejector has been shaving the brass in this rifle from the looks of it. I can't begin to imagine how much is under the extractor. What makes his bolt hard to close it the extractor will not easily jump over the case rim. That is what makes his bolt hard to close on the properly sized brass he has. The cocking piece is even hard to move over the travel area for it...no grease period....probably has never been apart.

He needs someone to do a heavy maintenance cleaning on both of these rifles including getting the bores back to a bright state.

I can't help him with someone that is able to do this in his area...maybe some of you can.
 
Thread starter #4
A no joke Remington 700 guy is what I would like I know just enough to start into the bolt and make a bad situation worse without a doubt
 

jglenn

Senior Member
Given that the difference between a go and nogo gauge is typically
.004 - 006 having .005 worth of brass on the bolt face would explain a lot.

Chase where are you located.. Someone will know a competent smith near you.
 

chuckdog

Senior Member
You have made sure the bolt serial number matches the one on the rifles?

Also loosen the front action screw a bit. I’ve seen both issues. Those extractors break fairly often and aren’t difficult to replace. Any Smith worth his salt should be able to clean those bolts up for you. Making a bore shine again may be more difficult.
 

rmp

Senior Member
I have 2 Remington 700's that may have some issues that will require a skilled gunsmith who is a 700 wizzard. They are standard 700's and have bolt issues with the bolt closing with ease on certian ammo. The ammo is within SAMMI specs. I had this problem with reloaded ammo and some factory ammo as well. I have been told it a combination of things from the rifles being shot with hot loads causing carbon and build up in the chamber and in the areas of the bolt. Still not sure why some brass will chamber with no issues and some wont. This problem happens with factory ammo as well as resized brass. I had a very compatant reloader come and check my brass and reloading equipment and it is all good to go so thats not it. Both guns are chambered in 220 Swift
I sent you a message Sunday regarding headspace gauges and pulling some measurements on your brass. You’re welcome to call but leave a voicemail. Thanks
 
Thread starter #11
Given that the difference between a go and nogo gauge is typically
.004 - 006 having .005 worth of brass on the bolt face would explain a lot.

Chase where are you located.. Someone will know a competent smith near you.
Winder but distance is not a issue. I can travel a pretty good distance to have these two guns made right
 

HughW2

Senior Member
Chase check out Roger Ferrell in Fayetteville, GA. He can help you with anything you want on 700. Blueprinting, extraction issues, ejection issues or re-chamber. He has a basic web page and is featured in ACGG. He is a highly competent reloader as well. Lots of experience with benchrest and varmint rifles. Roger 770-460-0533.
I hope this helps.
 
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I have 2 Remington 700's that may have some issues that will require a skilled gunsmith who is a 700 wizzard. They are standard 700's and have bolt issues with the bolt closing with ease on certian ammo. The ammo is within SAMMI specs. I had this problem with reloaded ammo and some factory ammo as well. I have been told it a combination of things from the rifles being shot with hot loads causing carbon and build up in the chamber and in the areas of the bolt. Still not sure why some brass will chamber with no issues and some wont. This problem happens with factory ammo as well as resized brass. I had a very compatant reloader come and check my brass and reloading equipment and it is all good to go so thats not it. Both guns are chambered in 220 Swift
Archer custom rifles in swainsboro
Or collier rifles out of Millen. 700 action is pretty easy to work on but joe has done some great work for me.
 
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