Bought a Pedal Kayak for Coastal Fishing...Now What?

Thread starter #1
I know nothing about kayak fishing, but I was looking for something to keep myself active and try to beat the astronomical fuel prices. I am familiar with Coffee Bluff and Sunbury, but what are some other options near Savannah where I could actually catch a fish or two without straying too far from the ramp/launch, at least until I become more familiar with the kayak's limitations?
 

Coenen

Senior Member
What kind of kayak?

Assuming the boat itself is capable, your main issue will be drift control with tide and wind. Pick your days, pick your spots, wear your PFD, and you'll be having fun in no time. Just take it easy the first few trips, until you're used to the way the boat handles. You'll feel shakey at first, but that will pass fairly quickly.

The salt is full of fish, a Gulp Shrimp fished slow on a jig head will catch the snot out of them pretty much anywhere in the marsh from what I've seen. This would be a better question over in the coastal fishing forum.
 
Once you get the feel of your yak,you will really enjoy fishing in it.
When you hook a big redfish,you'll get a sleigh ride!
 

Anvil Head

Senior Member
Agree, more about getting out there, taking your time and enjoy getting to know your equipment. The rest will come right along just fine. Make sure you have a cooler/container for your catch - gators and fins will grab a dangling stringer.
I seem to be able to find quality fish faster with a gold Little Cleo with red trebles, but that's what I'm used to. Good looking rig have fun.
 
I know nothing about kayak fishing, but I was looking for something to keep myself active and try to beat the astronomical fuel prices. I am familiar with Coffee Bluff and Sunbury, but what are some other options near Savannah where I could actually catch a fish or two without straying too far from the ramp/launch, at least until I become more familiar with the kayak's limitations?
How's it going?
 
If you don’t have a landing net, get one. The last thing you want is a fish thrashing around on top of your legs with hooks in his mouth. A good pair of hemostats with a float attached to them is a good thing to have as well.
 
Might want to consider figuring out how to get back into it if you fall out, and then practicing till it's second nature. Even shallow water can be a challenge. Then there is deep water re entry (can't touch the bottom) which depending on the type of kayak you have, can be a real challenge. I was one of those guys who took shark bait out through the breakers back in the late 70's early 80's in a kayak and I can tell you a thing or two about flipping one and then having to get back in.
 
Agree wholeheartedly w the landing net dry box (makes sure it attaches to something) and re-entry. I avoid the breakers cause I’ve been flipped before as well. Luckily I didn’t have rods with me. I also installed rod holders that are adjustable (tilt, rotate, lock the rod and come off). I like my spare rods low and parallel to the yak instead of standing upright. I snag them less while casting.
 
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