Brunswick Stew! Light Bread or Soda Crackers?

specialk

Senior Member
I gotta try that Good Hope store.
Growing up, always had Brunswick stew over bread. Haven't done that in years, but this tread has made me thinking about it.
Here in Jefferson there's a little place called Iron Pig BBQ, and there stew is just about how I like it. Not thick and chunky, a little thinner than the pictures of the Good Hope stew. I may go buy some of that when I get home. Have plenty of pulled pork in the freeze to go with it.
 

jicard3

Senior Member
Our Brunswick stew recipe calls for running everything through the grinder before stewing it down. You can't pick out any recognizable ingredient. We cook a cast iron wash pot full around Christmas every year and eat it any number of ways, spooned over a piece of toast, or with crackers on the side, maybe a bowl of stew and a cake of lace cornbread. My favorite is how my great grandmother served it, with a pot of grits. A few spoons full of stew in a bowl of grits is heaven on earth to me. I can't recall her actually saying it, but I always assumed they ate it that way because grits would have been a cheap way to stretch a pot of stew when times were hard. I've never seen anyone outside my family eat Brunswick stew and grits but it's one of those things that takes me right back to being a boy at great grandma's house.
 

Milkman

Retired Moderator
I gotta try that Good Hope store.
Growing up, always had Brunswick stew over bread. Haven't done that in years, but this tread has made me thinking about it.
Here in Jefferson there's a little place called Iron Pig BBQ, and there stew is just about how I like it. Not thick and chunky, a little thinner than the pictures of the Good Hope stew. I may go buy some of that when I get home. Have plenty of pulled pork in the freeze to go with it.
Iron Pig is good stew. I have family in Jefferson and eat from there occasionally.
 
Me too.
And if it's made right, it's a main course, not a side.:wink:

I prefer the little oyster crackers if I remember to get them. They stay together a little better.

And... If I do bread, I toast it to about blonde. That's pretty good too.
Hmmmm, I've never heard of that though I'm originally from North Carolina. Sounds tasty though, I'd give it a try.
Eaten a lot around tobacco barns during hanging time.
 
Interesting that I'm hearing y'all have it in West Georgia, I wasn't aware of that.
Never knew they used turtle until I read that link. Other, nearly identical variations of a "mull" can be made using either catfish, oysters or canned salmon, instead of chicken.

When I was growing up my Mom made a version using canned salmon. It was more mushy than soupy. I didn't care for it.
I'd probably like the chicken or even turtle better than salmon.
Chicken mull was the first (solid) food any of our children ate. Then they had buttered biscuit soked in coffee.
 
Well bud I haven't had it over here. I grew up in Putnam Co and spent a lot of time between there and Athens. Definitely seems to be a 441 corridor thing in Ga
My mother cooked it because she could feed a family of 7 on one chicken and some crackers. I don't think any well off families had to eat it.
 

mrs. hornet22

đź‘™Beach Dreamerđź‘™
Chicken mull was the first (solid) food any of our children ate. Then they had buttered biscuit soked in coffee.
I'll never forget fishing when I was young. Parents were broke and I didn't even know it. Mama caught a huge turtle and was so thrilled. We ate turtle mull a few days. Don't know if I'd eat it now, but then it was good.
 

Milkman

Retired Moderator
I'll never forget fishing when I was young. Parents were broke and I didn't even know it. Mama caught a huge turtle and was so thrilled. We ate turtle mull a few days. Don't know if I'd eat it now, but then it was good.
I had an aunt who loved turtle mull. Everyone in the family knew to take turtles to here. She would feed it biscuits for 2 weeks before killing it.
 
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