Canoe help

Thread starter #1
does you guys know any way to make more stable for fishing so where you cast so dont feel like it is going to roll on you it is a 17 gumman
 

Gunny146

Senior Member
I've seen some outrigger type deals that attach to the gunwales, think I saw em on Cabelas or Overtons.
 

sinclair1

Senior Member
I felt the same way, After watching BasserDrew stand up in his kayak going down the river. I decided it was in my head. I just let it rock,its not going to turn over.Once you get used to it rocking you will get confidence that all is good.:flag:
 
I've seen some outrigger type deals that attach to the gunwales, think I saw em on Cabelas or Overtons.
I've seen some very serviceable outriggers made out of PVC pipe and pool noodles.

Basically make a frame to sit inside the canoe with two arms on each side, strap some pool noodles to the ends, and there you go.
 

KDarsey

Senior Member
I would sell it for what you can and get you a kayak. You can carry plenty of gear and they are 100 times more stable and easier to transport too!

That's right.....you tell him!
You won't regret it..
 

Randy

Senior Member
Some canoes ar more stable than others. The Old Town Osprey is very stable. Kayaks are more stable than canoes. If you want an open boat like a canoe you might look at the Native Ultimates or the new Wilderness Commander. Just don't tell them an Ocean Kayak guy sent you.:D
 

Randy

Senior Member
I felt the same way, After watching BasserDrew stand up in his kayak going down the river. I decided it was in my head. I just let it rock,its not going to turn over.Once you get used to it rocking you will get confidence that all is good.:flag:
Don't be fooled by Drew. He is VERY talented. Not many can ride a yak like he can.
 

Ricky

Senior Member
Does it have a keel on the bottom?They help alot,in lakes and ponds,but they're kind of a pain in rivers with alot of rocks and shoals.A little "dead weight" up front helps also,if your alone.
 

Tugboat1

Senior Member
Regardless of the canoe, when you want some more stability just crouch down with the edge of your butt on the seat and your knees spread apart. ( three point stance)This lowers your center of gravity but is not entirely comfortable for everyone. 17 ft is a pretty long boat so use this when needed ( fast water and casting) and learn to brace with your paddle.
 
I would sell it for what you can and get you a kayak. You can carry plenty of gear and they are 100 times more stable and easier to transport too!
I have a canoe and a kayak, and I will say the canoe is much more stable by far.

That being said, as some have said, once you get confidence in standing in the craft, you should be ok.

And...that being said...not everyone has good balance. The only time I have fallen in the water is when my Dad tried to stand in my canoe..... horizon went vertical in a hurry!

And there are some out riggers you can put on your canoe. They are pretty expensive (over 150 dollars for steel and some big noodles), but they work well.

I stand in my yak doing pretty much anything. I have fallen in my yak a couple of times when I have hit an unseen rock, but my momentum is going forward, so I just fall into it.

Just don't try standing when the water and air is cold!
 

allenww

Senior Member
Canoe stability

Before you spend money, see how you like it with a concrete block in front.

I fish an old Grumman square stern. A concrete block in front when alone helps me a lot.

wa
 

stasher1

Senior Member
The extra weight in front is typically only necessary when using a square-stern canoe. A "standard" canoe can be turned around backwards and paddled from the bow seat. This puts your weight closer to the center and make the canoe easier to control.

I also do this when paddling with one or two of my kids since they don't weigh enough to keep the bow down in the water.
 
canoe stabilizers

OldMrwiskers I have experienced the same and after years of searching and research i found this Kay-noe canoe and kayak stabilizers. The guy builds these custom at his home in florida is super nice and ships quickly. I put this on my mad river 14 canoe along with a motor bracket with a 30# thrust minkota. I can walk from the stern to bow with no problem, stand up while casting and operating my trolling motor. Its the best design and built with quality materials, easy to install and remove and they swing in or lock out with ease.
 

wgatling

Senior Member
The stability of the boat comes from the width of the boat. Long boats go faster and track straighter. Straight is good unless you want to dodge rocks in a faster current. The length of the boat won't have any effect on the stability. The only reason a kayak would be more stable than a canoe is that kayakers are sitting lower to the water. The reduced center of gravity does make the stability better. That same reduced height would also be a handicap while fishing. Nothing is free.

Having a good brace stroke is always a great way to avoid having an out of boat experience. Getting the really good brace generally comes from lots of failed braces. My brace is rock solid!

Adding a removable do it yourself outrigger would be a good way to add some stability for when you get to a place you want to stop. The same outrigger will cause lots of difficulty when you want to paddle to a different spot. Keep it simple and light weight.
 
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