Clybel pork

Thread starter #1

The Rodney

Senior Member
Scouting doves this morning and bumped five hogs... very healthy specimens. I jump hogs here about every two years and now I'd like to take one. Anybody know a processor in the Jasper/Newton area who does hogs?

Also, I read you can take hogs with small game firearms during small game season which opens August 15.... anybody ever shoot a hog with a .22? The first two I came across were at 20 yds.
 

antharper

“Well Rounded Outdoorsman MOD “
Not sure about a processor , most that do it are deer processors and are closed this time of the year but they are pretty easy to process yourself . And far as 22 it will work and I have killed several with one but it has to be placed pretty good . I’d rather have my bow or muzzle loader
 

Waddams

Senior Member
My father in law has a .22WMR rimfire rifle. He hasn't done anything with hit in years and years except let it rust. I cleaned it up for him when I saw he had it. I've wanted to take it shooting with me sometime, and as long as it was in good working order, I've thought several times that it could make a decent rimfire hog option.
 

Gator89

Senior Member
Scouting doves this morning and bumped five hogs... very healthy specimens. I jump hogs here about every two years and now I'd like to take one. Anybody know a processor in the Jasper/Newton area who does hogs?

Also, I read you can take hogs with small game firearms during small game season which opens August 15.... anybody ever shoot a hog with a .22? The first two I came across were at 20 yds.
Headshots with a 22 lr will kill a hog, body shots are unlikely to produce a DRT kill.

I would try to obtain a 22 magnum and use a jacketed bullet for pigs, still go for head shots, but the 22WMR has a little more margin of error than 22lr.
 
Thread starter #5

The Rodney

Senior Member
Good advice but I only have 22LR and some research says the shot between the ear and eye is a good one. I wont try a body shot with the LR What about some buckshot through a .20 gauge heart/lung?
 

ditchdoc24

Senior Member
The Meat Shed in Putnam County processes hogs all year long. He had to stop temporarily this spring because he got Brucellosis and had to get some medical treatment. He just started taking hogs again in the last week or two. I've taken several hogs to him for processing and he does a great job.
 

bfriendly

Senior Member
I like a heart lung shot all day and a .22 will puncture and let the air out! I do have a .22 mag as well and carry that now, but don’t hesitate to try and take one with a .22lr!
BTW- very cool you bumped some hogs!!:rockon:

Even they know when it’s NOT hunting season:bounce:
 

bfriendly

Senior Member
Look a some videos on YouTube and you’ll see the best field method(IMHO) of taking the meat without ever opening The carcass In a nutshell, you unzip down the back with skinning or carpenter’s blade And remove backstraps. Skin just the hams and front shoulders and remove them. A hogs legs come apart very easy when you get your knife in the joint......hams, shoulders and straps, GON!
Don’t get me wrong, I’m all about going meat eater on it and using ALL of it, but I’ll be collecting 6 pieces and leaving an unopened carcass:cheers:
 
Look a some videos on YouTube and you’ll see the best field method(IMHO) of taking the meat without ever opening The carcass In a nutshell, you unzip down the back with skinning or carpenter’s blade And remove backstraps. Skin just the hams and front shoulders and remove them. A hogs legs come apart very easy when you get your knife in the joint......hams, shoulders and straps, GON!
Don’t get me wrong, I’m all about going meat eater on it and using ALL of it, but I’ll be collecting 6 pieces and leaving an unopened carcass:cheers:
Good info
 
Pretty much. I remove both front legs first. You can then spread the rear legs ( belly down) and they will hold the carcass for you while you remove the back straps/ loin. After I get those removed, I roll them on their back and take the hams. It’s real easy to process them yourself. Shoot smaller ones and you can cook the shoulders or hams in one cooking. Always Always wear latex gloves. Cut from the inside out or your knife blade edge won’t last 2 minutes. You cannot do it wrong. Wear the gloves. Good luck.
 
Thread starter #15

The Rodney

Senior Member
I did that with a few deer last year to practice for a hog... very cool. I plan on having a cooler full of ice that day and a few sons to help pack it out


Look a some videos on YouTube and you’ll see the best field method(IMHO) of taking the meat without ever opening The carcass In a nutshell, you unzip down the back with skinning or carpenter’s blade And remove backstraps. Skin just the hams and front shoulders and remove them. A hogs legs come apart very easy when you get your knife in the joint......hams, shoulders and straps, GON!
Don’t get me wrong, I’m all about going meat eater on it and using ALL of it, but I’ll be collecting 6 pieces and leaving an unopened carcass:cheers:
 
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