conical question

Thread starter #24
Top to bottom 385 grain conical, 250 grain sabots, 240 grain conical, shot at about 25 yards into a block of wood. 1 50 grain pellet of 777
 

Railroader

Senior Member
I've got a GP385 somewhere in a box that I shot into the dirt berm at the old police range.

It flattened out in one piece about the size of a half dollar.

I've never recovered one from a critter. Always leaves a hole you can see thru both sides... 😆
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
I have only recovered one 350-grain Maxi-hunter from a deer, and I have shot a traincar load with them. That one was facing me quartering. I shot it between the neck and the shoulder, and the bullet went all the way through the whole front-to-back length of the deer, and was stuck under the hide on the back of its back ham. It was about the size of a quarter. The deer dropped in its tracks. Solid lead projectiles and muzzleloaders are a great combination. Avoid bullets with plastic parts.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Thread starter #30
What I was trying to see was how a couple of these bullets would expand shooting just one 50 grain pellet of 777. The sabot and the smaller conical we're similar on penetration. But that 385 went pretty deep in wood with a lot of expansion.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
What I was trying to see was how a couple of these bullets would expand shooting just one 50 grain pellet of 777. The sabot and the smaller conical we're similar on penetration. But that 385 went pretty deep in wood with a lot of expansion.
I would keep it to short range with 50 grains, though.
 

Railroader

Senior Member
What I was trying to see was how a couple of these bullets would expand shooting just one 50 grain pellet of 777. The sabot and the smaller conical we're similar on penetration. But that 385 went pretty deep in wood with a lot of expansion.
Folks want to get all kinds of fancy with muzzleloaders, why I don't know...

It's extremely difficult to beat a good sized chunk of lead. Always has been, always will be...

50 grains, 50 yards, and you'll have no issues as long as you hit him good.
 

NCHillbilly

Administrator
Staff member
Folks want to get all kinds of fancy with muzzleloaders, why I don't know...

It's extremely difficult to beat a good sized chunk of lead. Always has been, always will be...

50 grains, 50 yards, and you'll have no issues as long as you hit him good.
There is nothing that works better in a muzzleloader at black powder velocities than a chunk of solid lead. Round and patched with a slow twist, conical and bore-sized with a faster twist.
 
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