Covenant study

Thread starter #1
Abrahamic and Davidic covenants nicely exegeted.
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We New Covenant teachers and ministries are often teaching about how Jesus' New Covenant is "more glorious" [2 Corinthians 3:8] than the Old Covenant. Rightly so! As Hebrews 13:10 states, "We have an altar from which those who serve the tabernacle have no right to eat."

An aspect I've been chewing on this past week is that oftentimes we are stating that Jesus' New Covenant replaced the Old [and it did/does], and it's the Abrahamic Covenant [based on the Promise by grace through faith], that also aligns with the New Covenant.

It's the Covenant to David that is also used by both Paul and Peter to show the beauty and glory of the New Covenant. There are several passages here worth noting. Let's start with Paul.

Paul uses the David Covenant in Acts 13:30‭-‬39. You will need to read that. The highlight is that Paul states, "I will give you the Holy and faithful mercies of David" [Acts 13:34]. Later, Paul says, "Therefore He also says in another Psalm, ‘You will not allow Your Holy One to undergo decay.’ For David, after he had served the purpose of God in his own generation, fell asleep, and was laid among his fathers and underwent decay; but He whom God raised did not undergo decay. Therefore let it be known to you, brethren, that through Him forgiveness of sins is proclaimed to you, and through Him everyone who believes is freed from all things, from which you could not be freed through the Law of Moses" [Acts 13:35-39]. Both Paul and Peter will quote from Psalm 2 and the promise God gave to David in 2 Samuel 7.

Let's look at Peter's use of the David Covenant in Acts 2. This is when/where the Holy Spirit comes at Pentecost and the disciples are gathered together. Peter then starts a sermon to the Jews in Judea and all who live in Jerusalem using the prophecy out of Joel [see Acts 2:17-21]. From their, Peter uses David in several passages. You will need to read Acts 2:22-36 for the full context.

In verse 25, Peter quotes this view David had regarding the salvation he was always beholding because of these promises God gave David in 2 Samuel 7. He is quoting from Psalm 16:8-11 in Acts 2:25-28, "For David says of Him, 'I saw the Lord continually before me, Because He is at my right hand, so that I will not be shaken. Therefore my heart was glad and my tongue was overjoyed; Moreover my flesh also will live in hope; For You will not abandon my soul to Hades,
Nor will You allow Your Holy One to undergo decay. You have made known to me the ways of life; You will make me full of gladness with Your presence.’"

Peter then continues to use David as his example as the patriarch and states, "So because he was a prophet and knew that God had sworn to him with an oath to seat one of his descendants on his throne, he looked ahead and spoke of the resurrection of the Christ, that He was neither abandoned to Hades, nor did His flesh suffer decay" [Acts 2:30-31].

Thus, David was speaking to the personal Promise and Oath that was made to him, all based on a Messiah/Savior who would not undergo decay [the Holy One of Israel] and he would be resurrected. In this sense, David was looking ahead to the resurrection and the Saint today is looking back at the resurrection. Each has that faith and hope!

Well, what was/were those Promises? The promises of God to David are detailed in 2 Samuel 7:8-16. David expresses apparent remorse to the prophet Nathan over the fact that he [Nathan] lives in a house of cedar while God’s ark remains in a tent [vrs 2], and the prophet encourages David to do whatever it is the king has in mind — presumably, build God a “proper” home in the form of a grand temple.

But that night, God speaks to Nathan about David, requesting that Nathan convey several things to David. First, God says, "He never asked for a house of cedar” [vrs 7]. Then, God reminds David about the good things He’s done for him so far, including appointing him as ruler and cutting off his enemies [verses 8-9]. And finally, instead of allowing David to do nice things for God, God tells David what He is going to do for him. Here's the list:

Make his name great [vrs 9]
Establish a home for Israel [vrs 10].
Keep the people from oppression [vrs 10].
Give David rest from his enemies [vrs 11].
Establish a house for David through his offspring [verses 11-14].
Allow David’s son to build God’s temple [vrs 13].
Never take His love from him or his offspring [vrs 15].

God concludes, “Your house and your kingdom will endure forever before me; your throne will be established forever” [2 Samuel 7:16].

It's 2 Samuel 7:16, this last verse, that is the reference to Jesus' New Covenant and the Messiah who Scripture tells us does indeed stem from the lineage of King David and whose kingdom we know truly has no end.

Thus, as I'm interacting with the legalist and Law-keeper, it's a real challenge to them to consider ... do you want the yoke of the Law that no Jew was ever able to keep [Acts 15:10], or would you like to rest IN "the tender mercies of David" [Acts 13:34] that were given/provided by grace through faith and which had no conditions on the recipients?

It's really a good question. Our glorious New Covenant that Jesus mediated is "more glorious" than the Law. It really is the fulfillment of both the Abrahamic and Davidic Covenant.
Praise God that His desire and aim has been for the Saint to be "the lovely dwelling place of God" [Psalm 84:1; John 14:1-2, 23] and it was accomplished in the Savior/Messiah making the Way through His death/burial/resurrection and now His indwelling through the Spirit.

Mark
Jesus New Covenant Academy
======================
*_INFO_ - Jesus New Covenant Academy *JNCA* [Hebrews 8:10-12]:
*JNCA* is a teaching ministry sharing
*forgiveness* and *life* mediated through
Jesus' death, burial and resurrection.
*The Four [4] Promises/Provisions*:
He remembers our sins and
lawless deeds no more.
He writes His laws on our heart
and mind.
He becomes our God, we become
His people.
All can know Him, from the least
to the greatest.
 
Thread starter #2
"It's not written in stone..."

A phrase/idiom often used by people to suggest something is not permanently fixed or firmly established; implying change is still possible ... as long as it's not written in stone.

God didn’t just engrave the 10 into stone before Moses, He would later require *all* (613) commands and statutes to be written on large stone tablets before the Israelites would enter the promised land.

Why? Because they were all part of one (1) law, not divided into different categories or separate packages as religion has tried to make them. They were like an engine with different parts, interconnected and working as one unit. One rule or statute would have a domino effect with any number of other commandments.

For the Jewish people (not Gentiles), God required this one law - all of it - be kept by doing every dot and iota of it or suffer the consequences. And He declared that *nothing* shall ever be added to it or taken away from it (although that is something that has been specialized skillfully within the Christian church world).

Written in stone. Not to be altered or amended. Permanent, right? And yet with one mighty act, Jesus erased it. He wiped it out. Nailed it to the cross. Broke it down. Abolished it. Deleted it permanently from the hard drive. Brought it to an end so that it no longer has any glory at all. Zippo glory. It's obsolete. All of it. That's because all of the parts were bundled into one law that could never be broken up in order for it to function the way it had been intended. It either *all* had to remain in effect, or it all had to be fulfilled so faith could come.

So this barrier or dividing wall that had kept Jewish people from attaining right-standing with God ... and had kept non-Jewish people without hope and with no covenant at all ... has been taken out of the way, allowing both groups to have access to the heavenly Father by one Spirit.

This same Spirit who raised Christ from the dead and now lives in you, desires to express Himself through you. Not by fleshly works on our part for us to boast in ourselves, but by us bearing *His* fruit which He produces. Unlike the first weak and faulty covenant, this occurs *apart* from a law of works which could only bring death and condemnation. We are partakers of something far better, something established upon better promises ... and no, it's not written in stone. It is established in grace. And that's good news for everyone.
 
"It's not written in stone..."

A phrase/idiom often used by people to suggest something is not permanently fixed or firmly established; implying change is still possible ... as long as it's not written in stone.

God didn’t just engrave the 10 into stone before Moses, He would later require *all* (613) commands and statutes to be written on large stone tablets before the Israelites would enter the promised land.

Why? Because they were all part of one (1) law, not divided into different categories or separate packages as religion has tried to make them. They were like an engine with different parts, interconnected and working as one unit. One rule or statute would have a domino effect with any number of other commandments.

For the Jewish people (not Gentiles), God required this one law - all of it - be kept by doing every dot and iota of it or suffer the consequences. And He declared that *nothing* shall ever be added to it or taken away from it (although that is something that has been specialized skillfully within the Christian church world).

Written in stone. Not to be altered or amended. Permanent, right? And yet with one mighty act, Jesus erased it. He wiped it out. Nailed it to the cross. Broke it down. Abolished it. Deleted it permanently from the hard drive. Brought it to an end so that it no longer has any glory at all. Zippo glory. It's obsolete. All of it. That's because all of the parts were bundled into one law that could never be broken up in order for it to function the way it had been intended. It either *all* had to remain in effect, or it all had to be fulfilled so faith could come.

So this barrier or dividing wall that had kept Jewish people from attaining right-standing with God ... and had kept non-Jewish people without hope and with no covenant at all ... has been taken out of the way, allowing both groups to have access to the heavenly Father by one Spirit.

This same Spirit who raised Christ from the dead and now lives in you, desires to express Himself through you. Not by fleshly works on our part for us to boast in ourselves, but by us bearing *His* fruit which He produces. Unlike the first weak and faulty covenant, this occurs *apart* from a law of works which could only bring death and condemnation. We are partakers of something far better, something established upon better promises ... and no, it's not written in stone. It is established in grace. And that's good news for everyone.
When I think of the New Covenant I don't think of it as replacing the "Old" Covenant. I see the Old as a skeleton. The New gave it flesh and the breath of life. The Old was indeed written in stone, the New is written in vibrant, brilliant, eternal sentience.
 
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