Detroit Axle

Thread starter #1

zedex

Senior Member
I know many people are looking for good prices for parts. Dont even consider Detroit Axle, also selling as Dearborn Axle.
They do have low prices, but zero quality.
For my truck, I bought a rack and pinion with inner tie rods installed, both outer t-rods and wheel bearing- hubs. They advertise lifetime warranty.
The rack fits but the hydraulic lines will not seal. After installing the rack and outer t-rods, while doing the alignment, I noticed the jam nut was pushing the outer t-rods right off the inner tie rods. Disassembled everything and found that the threads on the outer t-rods were minimal. Not enough to hold jamnut pressure. I went and bought moog outters , reassembled and tried to align again. This time, it's the threads of the inner tie rods that gave out. I'm not happy about this. Went and bought moog inners, installed them. While aligning, again, I see that the hydraulic line is leaking. Replaced o-ring. Then end seal blows out.
Called Detroit axle about this stuff. Told them I will send junk back. They say "no warranty" because I am not in the US. I explained that the website doesnt state this at all. It says they will replace any defective parts, period. Man tells me to deal with it.
So, I went to bank that issues credit card used and explained to them. Visa says I have buyer protection and they will recall the funds.
So, now, I have to buy another rack and pinion unit and install the moog parts. This time, I'm buying locally even though its 4 times the price.

As for the bearing/hub assemblies, I threw those away.

Doing research I should have to begin with, I found that Detroit axle is also Dearborn axle and they send parts to china to be rebuilt and shipped back then sold.

I also found out that moog and AC Delco are Chinese made. Why cant we do these things anymore? I'd rather spent the extra on parts built to last, not break and cause crashes
 

Cmp1

Senior Member
I know many people are looking for good prices for parts. Dont even consider Detroit Axle, also selling as Dearborn Axle.
They do have low prices, but zero quality.
For my truck, I bought a rack and pinion with inner tie rods installed, both outer t-rods and wheel bearing- hubs. They advertise lifetime warranty.
The rack fits but the hydraulic lines will not seal. After installing the rack and outer t-rods, while doing the alignment, I noticed the jam nut was pushing the outer t-rods right off the inner tie rods. Disassembled everything and found that the threads on the outer t-rods were minimal. Not enough to hold jamnut pressure. I went and bought moog outters , reassembled and tried to align again. This time, it's the threads of the inner tie rods that gave out. I'm not happy about this. Went and bought moog inners, installed them. While aligning, again, I see that the hydraulic line is leaking. Replaced o-ring. Then end seal blows out.
Called Detroit axle about this stuff. Told them I will send junk back. They say "no warranty" because I am not in the US. I explained that the website doesnt state this at all. It says they will replace any defective parts, period. Man tells me to deal with it.
So, I went to bank that issues credit card used and explained to them. Visa says I have buyer protection and they will recall the funds.
So, now, I have to buy another rack and pinion unit and install the moog parts. This time, I'm buying locally even though its 4 times the price.

As for the bearing/hub assemblies, I threw those away.

Doing research I should have to begin with, I found that Detroit axle is also Dearborn axle and they send parts to china to be rebuilt and shipped back then sold.

I also found out that moog and AC Delco are Chinese made. Why cant we do these things anymore? I'd rather spent the extra on parts built to last, not break and cause crashes
Dang man,,,,can you recommend a place to show how to do an alignment yourself,,,,do you need the angles setup?

Thanks
 
Thread starter #3

zedex

Senior Member
Dang man,,,,can you recommend a place to show how to do an alignment yourself,,,,do you need the angles setup?

Thanks
Anyone can do their own alignment. Just have to have the equipment. Toe plates, camber/caster gauges, steering wheel lock. For most folks, the expense of the equipment isn't worth it unless you do all the work yourself and repair for others.

If the alignment is good to begin with, after replacing a component, the string method will put you pretty close except for vehicles that should have 4 wheel alignment.

Most trucks can make do with the string method or accurate steel straight edge. Either way, it's best to use a caliper to take before and after measurements
 

Cmp1

Senior Member
Anyone can do their own alignment. Just have to have the equipment. Toe plates, camber/caster gauges, steering wheel lock. For most folks, the expense of the equipment isn't worth it unless you do all the work yourself and repair for others.

If the alignment is good to begin with, after replacing a component, the string method will put you pretty close except for vehicles that should have 4 wheel alignment.

Most trucks can make do with the string method or accurate steel straight edge. Either way, it's best to use a caliper to take before and after measurements
Thanks,,,,you're talking plumb line, right?
 
Thread starter #6

zedex

Senior Member
Thanks,,,,you're talking plumb line, right?
Sort of, yea.

Using a string, tie one end to the rear tire and guide the line around the front of the truck, across the front tires and to the other rear tire. It needs to be so that the string contacts each tire at the center and contacts the rear tires front and back. The front tire's rearward sidewalls should barely touch the string, not lay hard against it or have a gap between.
The steering wheel must be straight centered.
Camber and caster are a bit more difficult than toe adjustments.
Camber/caster gauges make this more pleasant to do, but a string and degree wheel can get you pretty close.
Using a weighted string, or even a level, place at top of tire and allow to free hang down without touching the ground. Measure, with the degree wheel and adjust accordingly.
During the entire process, the vehicle must be on level concrete.
For quick toe adjustments without the floating toe plates, you can use sand on concrete and a 1x6 board about 12 inches long on top of the sand. This allows the tires to slide while adjusting because the tires resting on the board, on the sand, on the concrete reduces friction. A thin coat of sand is all you need. Also, the rear tires need to be on the same thickness of board to maintain levelness.
Of course, before any of this, all steering a suspension components must be checked and verified as good and if vehicle is equipped with a steering gear, any excessive play must be dealt with and you must have all of the factory angle specifications for your vehicle. It should also be noted that these procedures are not exact. They are close enough to make the vehicle predictably driveable to get to a proper alignment facility.
But, if you have an old truck that is pretty much a "yard dog", plantation buggy, short distance dump runner or bush buggy, they're good enough. Highway vehicles need a proper alignment
 
Had Detroit Lockers in a '67 half cab Bronco, would go most places a 4x4 couldn't touch, but that's been many years ago.
Different Detroit stuff Quackbro, Detroit lockers are still some of the best, Detroit Axle is a hit and miss company and a different company. All their parts are manufactured by the lowest bidding ChiCom they can find. Sell most of their dreck on eBay.
 

Cmp1

Senior Member
Sort of, yea.

Using a string, tie one end to the rear tire and guide the line around the front of the truck, across the front tires and to the other rear tire. It needs to be so that the string contacts each tire at the center and contacts the rear tires front and back. The front tire's rearward sidewalls should barely touch the string, not lay hard against it or have a gap between.
The steering wheel must be straight centered.
Camber and caster are a bit more difficult than toe adjustments.
Camber/caster gauges make this more pleasant to do, but a string and degree wheel can get you pretty close.
Using a weighted string, or even a level, place at top of tire and allow to free hang down without touching the ground. Measure, with the degree wheel and adjust accordingly.
During the entire process, the vehicle must be on level concrete.
For quick toe adjustments without the floating toe plates, you can use sand on concrete and a 1x6 board about 12 inches long on top of the sand. This allows the tires to slide while adjusting because the tires resting on the board, on the sand, on the concrete reduces friction. A thin coat of sand is all you need. Also, the rear tires need to be on the same thickness of board to maintain levelness.
Of course, before any of this, all steering a suspension components must be checked and verified as good and if vehicle is equipped with a steering gear, any excessive play must be dealt with and you must have all of the factory angle specifications for your vehicle. It should also be noted that these procedures are not exact. They are close enough to make the vehicle predictably driveable to get to a proper alignment facility.
But, if you have an old truck that is pretty much a "yard dog", plantation buggy, short distance dump runner or bush buggy, they're good enough. Highway vehicles need a proper alignment
Thanks,,,,
 
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