Doeless December

HOGDOG76

Senior Member
I see the explanation provided for why december was picked but still dont know if that was the best choice. My thought being late october thru November is most folks choice time for chasing a buck, so why not make November doeless. We all know the chances for taking a buck is less is in december so why not leave it open for does and keep folks in the woods.
 
I see the explanation provided for why december was picked but still dont know if that was the best choice. My thought being late october thru November is most folks choice time for chasing a buck, so why not make November doeless. We all know the chances for taking a buck is less is in december so why not leave it open for does and keep folks in the woods.
You're one step away from cracking the code.
 

respro

Senior Member
My thoughts: Bow season opens 9-1, gun season opens 10-1 and ends 10-31 for either sex. Gun season ends 1-15. Archery either sex all season. $10,000 fine for shooting a doe after 10-31. All deer checked in with DNR check stations. I can dream.
 

dfhooked

Senior Member
I see the explanation provided for why december was picked but still dont know if that was the best choice. My thought being late october thru November is most folks choice time for chasing a buck, so why not make November doeless. We all know the chances for taking a buck is less is in december so why not leave it open for does and keep folks in the woods.


^this
__________________
 

JohnK

Senior Member
I see the explanation provided for why december was picked but still dont know if that was the best choice. My thought being late october thru November is most folks choice time for chasing a buck, so why not make November doeless. We all know the chances for taking a buck is less is in december so why not leave it open for does and keep folks in the woods.
Sounds good to me
 
To appease arrogant and pride filled horn hunters. Don't believe that garbage DNR printed in the current hunting regs book either, this is all about horn and pride.
 
To appease arrogant and pride filled horn hunters. Don't believe that garbage DNR printed in the current hunting regs book either, this is all about horn and pride.
Really? What is the impact on horns of reducing the doe harvest?
 

mauser64

Senior Member
Go back and look at the threads on here from last year as well as the rate your season deal on GON and public meetings. So many complaints from hunters about no deer, too many doe days, to high of a limit, too many coyotes etc. etc. DNR responded in their recommendations to the legislature for this change. Seems like we got exactly what we asked for.
 

Milkman

Retired Moderator
I know right? I usually stop reading after the part that says when opening day is! :banginghe
I try to read up over the whole booklet most years. The most important part to read is the page showing whats new for this year.

We had the same scenario a few years back when they started allowing kids under 16 to use a centerfire during muzzleloader week. MANY folks didnt know due to it being new and failing to read up.
 

mauser64

Senior Member
I was being a little tongue in cheek. I read the regs every year but I did miss the archery detail on this one.
 

tnhikr44

Senior Member
.... It's a known fact that if you harvest more bucks than does, the overall population will increase.
Making an assumption or two I do not think the numbers support this "known fact".
The first assumption is that the 640 acres (1 sq. mile) me and my hunting buddy hunt have 25 deer on it. I have seen that number pop up several times so I am somewhat comfortable using it. The next assumption is that the buck - doe ratio is 1:5. I do not recall every seeing a state wide buck - doe ratio, so I am basing that number on bag limits. But for discussion sake lets just say that is the case, in our one square mile hunting area we have 5 bucks and 20 does.
If the fawn recruitment rates are 26%, our herd will increase by 5 deer next fall (assuming all does get successfully bred) (20 does @ .26 = 5.2) if we shoot no deer this year. If we shoot more than five deer, in any combination, we will, based on several assumptions, have a negative impact on our deer herd. Based on 25 deer per acre, 1:5 buck - doe ratio and a 26% fawn recruitment rate.
That is three deer a piece, over 640 acres, to have a negative impact on our herd.
The answer to this 'problem' (low fawn recruitment rates) lies elsewhere, not in specific doe harvest days. In my opinion. But I concede my opinion to those who get paid to assemble all this questionable data and make some changes in order to address the problem.
 
Whine

Seems either way it goes someone will always whine. Sure there are places in Ga where there are plenty of deer and no reason to place restrictions but it appears most of Ga doesn't have good populations.

If you live in a area where you are seeing less deer every year, then shooting deer as you have always done won't make the deer population better.


As to feeding your family, I doubt that nayone on here is going hungry and the last time I checked venison wasn't cheap.

As to why DNR has to get involved ... it's because we can't regulate ourselves.

I personally doubt the sucess of DNR's plan as in my opinion the deer herd is tied to sufficient food for the deer population. Even if their plan results in more does this year, the deer still have to have enough to eat or they will die or be killed by predators due to weakness.
Areas with good deer populations and populations that remain good have several factors. Those factors are abundance of nearby farm crops, proper deer management/supplement feeding programs and areas where there are minimum or no pine tree farming e.g. hilly and mountain areas. The bottom line is FOOD and deer don't eat pine cones.
 
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