Fertilizing Fall Food Plots - Wilkes CO.

Thread starter #21
Cowpeas, buckwheat, soybeans will be gone after the frost. Clover turnips rape radish are slower growers. They will slow way down if it gets cold early too. The wheat,rye,oats look basically identical at this stage so you won't be able to tell them apart. The wet seed may germinate or may have rotted? You'll be able to tell better in a couple weeks. As it is it looks fine, just depends on what you are shooting for. I like mine to be a solid, dark green carpet and plant accordingly.
I doubt it rotted...we planted it 10.3 and it rained 10.11 and it sprouted after that...the rain was super heavy due to the hurricane...the plots are still wet...and the dew is keeping them that way...probably will get a chance to dry out this week...what about the peas?
 
Thread starter #23
If they stay submerged, the ones that haven't germinated, too long in these 80 temps they can easily go bad. What is your question about the peas?
There is no standing water, but wet clay soil...question was you named everything except the peas...what is the story with them, frost, growth, etc.?
 

Dbender

Senior Member
Austrian peas are hit and miss, some places deer love them some thwy don't hardly touch. They grow good and frost won't kill.them off like the other peas. As long as there's no standing water, your seeds are fine. Good luck this year.
 
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Thread starter #26
So got some more close ups this weekend...the last picture is a plot where the soil definitely needs some more work, the rest are coming in pretty good except for for very hard pack and erosion. I think this rain will really help...they will have gotten about 4" since planting now...what do you guys think?
IMG_1359.JPG IMG_1360.JPG IMG_1361.JPG IMG_1362.JPG IMG_1363.JPG IMG_1364.JPG IMG_1365.JPG
 

Canuck5

Senior Member
The first 2 pictures are a little thicker with brassica's than I'd like, but I make that mistake too, and when you're starting with a "mix", you don't have much control. Then again, once the deer get in there and start enjoying them, after a hard frost, it might not matter.

I think you've done well! Keep an eye on what and when the deer start eating what you planted. This is a first year loading deck of mine and you can see where they sat their equipment. Compacted soil, but hopefully, next year will be a little better.

57 Triticale 10-22-20.jpg
 
Thread starter #29
Thanks @Canuck5 and any insights or advice is welcome. I am very happy given this is first year logging decks...some of them are seriously compacted and full of gravel...it is going to take a while to get them in shape...but that's the fun part!
 
Thread starter #30
The first 2 pictures are a little thicker with brassica's than I'd like, but I make that mistake too, and when you're starting with a "mix", you don't have much control. Then again, once the deer get in there and start enjoying them, after a hard frost, it might not matter.

I think you've done well! Keep an eye on what and when the deer start eating what you planted. This is a first year loading deck of mine and you can see where they sat their equipment. Compacted soil, but hopefully, next year will be a little better.

View attachment 1045884
What is planted in this photo?
 

Canuck5

Senior Member
"Surge" Triticale (a hybrid of cereal rye and wheat), reseeding crimson clover, "Zulu" arrowleaf clover, and Freedom! Medium red clover.
 

Ihunt

Senior Member
Clay is always a tough critter to deal with. Is there any way you can subsoil it? Even with rain, those plants will struggle in hard clay.
Also, a little nitrogen will give it a growth spurt. If you don’t know, do not apply when the plants are damp from rain or dew.
If you are able to subsoil it, try to keep vehicles and heavy equipment off of it. That leads to compacted soil and is the main reason farmers don’t want you driving on a field even after the crops have been harvested.
 
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