Georgia's New Cases Flattened Yesterday

Denton

Senior Member
I don't think that will hold as we saw this about a week ago followed by another sharp increase in both new cases and deaths.

If it is true and it does hold, wonder how much the social distancing and work from home orders, no school, etc helped this? If I were a betting man, I would lay some serious case down on why. Most reasonable Americans would too.
I think a good bit of people are trying to do social distancing but a lot of them don’t seem to be that smart. In the last week I’ve passed the same public park a couple of times and it’s been packed with parents and kids every time. It’s a head scratcher as to why they close schools for safety and then parents go group the kids together somewhere different and think it’s ok.
 
If the CDC, NIH and WHO are correct about the incubation period for COVID-19 then it is far too soon for the social distancing, closures, and quarantines to make a difference. Either the "flattening of the curve" we are seeing is an aberration or the rate of infection for the more serious cases is not what was predicted!
 

Denton

Senior Member
If the CDC, NIH and WHO are correct about the incubation period for COVID-19 then it is far too soon for the social distancing, closures, and quarantines to make a difference. Either the "flattening of the curve" we are seeing is an aberration or the rate of infection for the more serious cases is not what was predicted!
Or we're still capped on the number of tests we can give per day.
 
Thread starter #7

MudDucker

Moderator
Staff member
If the CDC, NIH and WHO are correct about the incubation period for COVID-19 then it is far too soon for the social distancing, closures, and quarantines to make a difference. Either the "flattening of the curve" we are seeing is an aberration or the rate of infection for the more serious cases is not what was predicted!
Since most who have symptoms start showing at 5-14 days, we are entering a timeline when it could peak.

Testing capability is growing very fast and they have nearly finished results on the back log of cases.

However, the best answer is who knows.
 

Ruger#3

RAMBLIN MOD
Staff member
As more tests become available the data will reflect this. We should be looking at a rate of cases in a population not raw numbers.
 

GoldDot40

Senior Member
The cases being reported (in GA at least) are a few days behind. Officials plan on having them potentially caught up by Monday or Tuesday of next week. When that happens, you will see a major spike in the confirmed case numbers...and more panic will ensue. This is from a military contact.
 
My wife’s best friend just called her. She was at Piedmont Covington with her daughter. Her daughter is a hodgeskins lymphoma cancer survivor of for two years now. Her daughter is 20. She started having symptoms last Thursday. High fever, dry cough, aches but no shortness of breath or sore throat. She got worse and on Saturday they called the Covid hotline. Her information was taken and she was told they would get back with her.
So on Monday she wasn’t doing any better. The Covid folks finally called back Monday and said she was not a candidate for a test and to contact her regular doctor. The doctor on Monday advised OTC medications. They followed his recommendations. On Tuesday she was a lot worse and they called the doctor back. The nurse they were talking to heard her coughing in the background and advised them to go to the ER and get a chest X-ray. They got those results this morning and she has pneumonia. The doctor advised them to go back to the ER.
They went and they gave her IV fluids and told them that she probably has Covid and to keep treating with the OTC meds. The nurse told them that there was no test available. That it was like we are a 3rd world country. She said it was really bad in Atlanta. They are only admitting the critical and sending everyone else home. Said they are short of everything they need. This was all firsthand from my wife’s friend. It just doesn’t seem to match what I’m reading and hearing about all the test are available.
 
Yep...this HAS NOT PEAKED. I’m just waiting until the front line Hospital workers start dropping off due to exposures/illness takes them out. There will be even fewer people to take care of the blossoming numbers. FWIW,I hope I’m wrong...but I don’t think so☹️
 
As more tests become available the data will reflect this. We should be looking at a rate of cases in a population not raw numbers.
This and the only real statistic that matters much is how many hospital beds with ventilators do we have and how many people need them. Most folks are going to get well from this infection on their own just like with the flu, thank goodness.
 
Thread starter #15

MudDucker

Moderator
Staff member
This weeks numbers are starting to show the commercial lab's test results and they spike immediately when those numbers started rolling in. Testing will be ramped up in Georgia because unfortunately, we are in the top 10 now.
 

Waddams

Senior Member
The testing being performed isn't adequate to do anything other than show 15-20% of everyone tested has it based on the number's I'm seeing. Everyone with symptoms isn't being tested. Just the ones that might need more intensive medical care because they are sicker. People that have it but aren't that bad off yet - we're missing them in the numbers.

I don't think we'll see a true peak and then decline in new cases for another few weeks at least. And maybe not then because there are enough knuckleheads not heeding the warnings to keep the positive hits from testing rising. We could see the numbers still accelerate as testing expands while the overall rate might start declining because testing isn't expanded enough to see it.

This and the only reas statistic that matters much is how many hospital beds with ventilators do we have and how many people need them. Most folks are going to get well from this infection on their own just like with the flu, thank goodness.
agree - it's just harder to test our population because it's so much larger than Italy, Spain, etc. we also travel greater distances as a matter of daily life so we come around more people regularly here than over there.

our healthcare system is going to have to rely on using it's available resources to meet the end goal to support those that need it first. those infected but not hit hard by it won't get tested as they don't need the confirmation and extra support. we won't ever have a true accounting of how widespread this gets, or has already become.
 
My wife’s best friend just called her. She was at Piedmont Covington with her daughter. Her daughter is a hodgeskins lymphoma cancer survivor of for two years now. Her daughter is 20. She started having symptoms last Thursday. High fever, dry cough, aches but no shortness of breath or sore throat. She got worse and on Saturday they called the Covid hotline. Her information was taken and she was told they would get back with her.
So on Monday she wasn’t doing any better. The Covid folks finally called back Monday and said she was not a candidate for a test and to contact her regular doctor. The doctor on Monday advised OTC medications. They followed his recommendations. On Tuesday she was a lot worse and they called the doctor back. The nurse they were talking to heard her coughing in the background and advised them to go to the ER and get a chest X-ray. They got those results this morning and she has pneumonia. The doctor advised them to go back to the ER.
They went and they gave her IV fluids and told them that she probably has Covid and to keep treating with the OTC meds. The nurse told them that there was no test available. That it was like we are a 3rd world country. She said it was really bad in Atlanta. They are only admitting the critical and sending everyone else home. Said they are short of everything they need. This was all firsthand from my wife’s friend. It just doesn’t seem to match what I’m reading and hearing about all the test are available.
Maybe this woman was sent home for the same reason. She was found dead and her young child was alone with her for hours.

https://www.11alive.com/article/new...death/85-2d8bc601-a9b8-47b4-8fb6-94db5314c822
 

srb

Senior Member
Health care workers on the front line will get hit the hardest, It’s on the horizon, I hope a lot of people do not end up with emergency situations ,because there may not be many left to take care of you:
 

GoldDot40

Senior Member
Health care workers on the front line will get hit the hardest, It’s on the horizon, I hope a lot of people do not end up with emergency situations ,because there may not be many left to take care of you:
Which raises another point of why people should not be out and about. Less cars on the highways equals less pedestrians getting run over, less serious vehicle accidents, etc. Just a few less things ER's would need to worry about.
 
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